Romane 2016

gelesen 2016: meine 20 besten Bücher des Jahres

bucher-2016-stefan-mesch

.

Die 20 Bücher, die ich möglichst vielen Menschen empfehlen kann:

meine Entdeckungen 2016.

2015 empfahl ich Bücher etwas ausführlicher.

Favoriten 2014 | Favoriten 2013 | Favoriten 2012 | Favoriten 2011

Lieblingscomics 2016 hier (Link).

Und: Songs 2016 (Link)!

.

bucher-2016-thomas-von-steinaecker-kei-sanbe-daniel-schreiber-sacha-batthyany

20: THOMAS VON STEINAECKER, „Die Verteidigung des Paradieses“

19: KEI SANBE, „Die Stadt, in der es mich nicht gibt“

18: DANIEL SCHREIBER: „Zuhause“ / SACHA BATTHYANY: „Und was hat das mit mir zu tun?“

.

bucher-2016-sylvie-schenk-matthias-hirth-a-s-king

17: SYLVIE SCHENK, „Schnell, dein Leben“

16: MATTHIAS HIRTH, „Lutra lutra“

15: A.S. KING, „Still Life with Tornado“

.

bucher-2016-raymond-briggs-delphine-de-vigan-emmanuel-guibert

14: RAYMOND BRIGGS, „Ethel and Ernest“

13: DELPHINE DE VIGAN: „Nach einer wahren Geschichte“

12: EMMANUEL GUIBERT: „How the World was. A California Childhood“

.

bucher-2016-kieron-gillen-gabriel-hardman-clemens-j-setz

11: KIERON GILLEN, „Darth Vader“

10: GABRIEL HARDMAN, CORINNA BECHKO, „Invisible Republic“

09: CLEMENS J. SETZ: „Glücklich wie Blei im Getreide“

.

bucher-2016-haruki-murakami-david-eagleman-nis-momme-stockmann

08: HARUKI MURAKAMI, „Von Beruf Schriftsteller“

07: DAVID EAGLEMAN, „Sum: 40 Tales from the Afterlives“

06: NIS-MOMME STOCKMANN, „Der Fuchs“

.

bucher-2016-andreas-maier-anna-katharina-hahn

05: ANDREAS MAIER, „Die Straße“ (und der Vorläufer „Das Zimmer“)

04: ANNA KATHARINA HAHN, „Am schwarzen Berg“

.

bucher-2016-randy-ingermanson-sophie-daull-brecht-evens

03: RANDY INGERMANSON, „Writing Fiction for Dummies“

02: SOPHIE DAULL, „Adieu, mein Kind“

01: BRECHT EVENS, „Panter“

…auch die Manga-Reihen „Billy Bat“, „Gute Nacht, Punpun“ und „I am a Hero“ waren/blieben großartig; und das Finale von Ed Brubakers dreiteiliger Graphic Novel „The Fade Out“ überzeugte mich.

Die besten Jugendbücher für 2017: Buchtipps

2014 WordPress Regal

.

Zweimal im Jahr stelle ich im Blog neue Jugendbücher vor:

.

heute, wie jedes Jahr vor Weihnachten:

Young-Adult-Romane (meist aus den USA), angelesen, sehr gemocht – von denen ich mir für 2017 Übersetzungen ins Deutsche wünsche.

.

01: STEPHANIE KATE STROHM, „It’s not me, it’s you“
  • High-School-Komödie, verfasst im Stil von Studs Terkel: „Zeitzeugen“ berichten – und widersprechen sich. Charmante Unterhaltung.

„Avery is one of the most popular girls in her class. But a public breakup causes disastrous waves. Now, Avery gets to thinking about the guys that she has dated. How come none of those relationships worked out? Could it be her fault? In history class she’s learning about this method of record-keeping called „oral history“. So Avery decides to go directly to the source. She tracks down all the guys and uses thoughts from friends, family, and teachers, to compile a total account of her dating history.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

It's Not Me, It's You

.

02: A.S. KING, „Still Life with Tornado“

  • Seit „Please don’t hate me“, „Please ignora Vera Dietz“ und „Reality Boy“ meine Lieblings-Jugendbuchautorin. Aber: auch wieder eine sehr zerquälte und flapsige Hauptfigur, die sich selbst im Weg steht. Kein Gute-Laune-Buch.

„Sarah is several people at once. And only one of them is sixteen. Her parents insist she’s a gifted artist with a bright future, but now she can’t draw a thing. Meanwhile, there’s a ten-year-old Sarah with a filthy mouth. A twenty-three-year-old Sarah with a bad attitude. And a forty-year-old Sarah. They’re all wandering Philadelphia, and they’re all worried about Sarah’s future. Sarah might be having an existential crisis. Or maybe all those other Sarahs are trying to wake her up before she’s lost forever in the tornado of violence and denial that is her parents’ marriage.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

Still Life with Tornado

.

03: SHANNON LEE ALEXANDER, „Life after Juliet“
  • Mainstream-Romance; aber deutlich besser geschrieben als nötig.

„When her best friend Charlotte died, Becca gave up on the real world and used her books to escape. Until she meets Max Herrera. He’s experienced loss, too. As it turns out, kissing is a lot better in real life than on a page. But happy endings aren’t always guaranteed.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

Life After Juliet

.

04: WILL KOSTAKIS, „The Sidekicks“

  • Das nichtssagende Cover stieß mich ab – aber die Figurenkonstellation macht Spaß. Auch, wenn alles hier (Thema, Tonfall) etwas gestrig/angestaubt wirkt.

„All Ryan, Harley and Miles had in common was Isaac. They lived different lives, had different interests and kept different secrets. But they shared the same best friend. They were sidekicks. And now that Isaac’s gone, what does that make them?“ [Klappentext, gekürzt].

The Sidekicks

.

05: JENNIFER NIVEN, „Holding up the Universe“

  • Ich bin gesichtsblind – wie die männliche Hauptfigur, hier; und glaube, das Buch trägt viel zu dick auf. Und: Ich bin kein Fan von Außenseiter-Romances. Trotzdem las ich los – und hatte Lust, noch lange weiter zu lesen.

„Everyone thinks they know Libby Strout, the girl once dubbed “America’s Fattest Teen.” Following her mom’s death, she’s been picking up the pieces in the privacy of her home. Everyone thinks they know Jack Masselin. What no one knows is that Jack can’t recognize faces. Even his own brothers are strangers to him. The two get tangled up in a cruel high school game—which lands them in group counseling and community service.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

Holding Up the Universe

.

06: NICOLA YOON, „The Sun is also a Star“

  • Noch eine Mainstream-Romance, die mich skeptisch macht. Aber: solide geschrieben.

Natasha: I believe in science and facts. Not destiny. Or dreams that will never come true. I’m not the kind of girl who meets a cute boy on a crowded New York City street and falls in love. Not when my family is twelve hours away from being deported to Jamaica. Daniel: I’ve always been the good son. Never the poet. Or the dreamer. But when I see Natasha, I forget about all that.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

The Sun Is Also a Star

.

07: J.P. ROMNEY, „The Monster on the Road is me“

  • Klischeehafte Figurenkonstellation, ein klischeehaft westlicher Blick auf Japan? Doch dass der Roman bei FSG erscheint, macht mir Mut. Im besten Fall: surreale, literarische All-Ages-Unterhaltung wie David Mitchell.

„Koda Okita is a high school student in modern-day Japan. He suffers from narcolepsy and has to wear a watermelon-sized helmet to protect his head in case he falls. When a rash of puzzling deaths sweeps his school, Koda discovers that his narcoleptic naps allow him to steal the thoughts of nearby supernatural beings. He learns that his small town is under threat from a ruthless mountain demon.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

The Monster on the Road Is Me

.

08: VICTORIA SCHWAB, „This Savage Song“

  • Die mittlerweile dritte (?) Trilogie von Victoria Schwab binnen weniger Jahre. Jedes Mal mag ich den Stil, doch jedes Mal langweilt mich die Erzählwelt.

„A city at war, a city overrun with monsters. Kate Harker and August Flynn are the heirs to a divided city. Kate wants to be as ruthless as her father, who lets the monsters roam free and makes the humans pay for his protection. August wants to be as good-hearted as his own father, to play a bigger role in protecting the innocent—but he’s one of the monsters. Kate discovers August’s secret, and after a failed assassination attempt the pair must flee for their lives.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

This Savage Song (Monsters of Verity, #1)

.

09: E.K. JOHNSTON, “Exit, Pursued by a Bear”

  • Hartes Thema, feministischer Blick: das Buch aus dieser Liste, auf das ich am gespanntesten bin.

“Hermione Winters is the envied girlfriend and the undisputed queen of her school. But then someone puts something in her drink at a party. Victim. Survivor. That raped girl. Even though this was never the future she imagined, one essential thing remains unchanged: Hermione can still call herself Polly Olivier’s best friend. Heartbreaking and empowering, Exit, Pursued by a Bearis the story of friendship in the face of trauma.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

Exit, Pursued by a Bear

.

10: JULIE BUXBAUM, “Tell me three Things”

Everything about Jessie is wrong. That’s what it feels like during her first week at her new ultra-intimidating prep school. It’s been barely two years since her mother’s death, and because her father eloped with a woman he met online, Jessie has been forced to move across the country. Buxbaum mixes comedy and tragedy, love and loss in her debut YA novel filled with characters who will come to feel like friends.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

Tell Me Three Things

.

zehn Middle-Grade-Novels (für ca. Elf- bis Vierzehnjährige):

.

11: NATALIE DIAS LORENZI, „A long Pitch Home“
  • Sentimentales Cover. Baseball lässt mich meist kalt. Doch ich mag „Ms. Marvel“ (…deren Eltern, Muslime aus Pakistan, nach New Jersey auswanderten), und hoffe auf einen ähnlich klugen, warmherzigen Blick/Ton.

„Ten-year-old Bilal liked his life back home in Pakistan. He was a star on his cricket team. But when his father suddenly sends the family to live with their aunt and uncle in America, nothing is familiar. While Bilal tries to keep up with his cousin Jalaal by joining a baseball league, he wonders when his father will join the family in Virginia. Playing baseball means navigating relationships with the guys, and with Jordan, the only girl on the team—the player no one but Bilal wants to be friends with.“ [Klappentext, leicht gekürzt]

A Long Pitch Home

.

12: JENN BISHOP, „The Distance to Home“

  • Baseball, Familie, Trauerarbeit: sehr amerikanisch – doch es wirkt nicht allzu seicht oder simpel.

„Quinnen was the star pitcher of her baseball team. After the death of her best friend and older sister, Haley, everything is different. The one glimmer of happiness comes from the Bandits, the local minor-league baseball team. For the first time, Quinnen and her family are hosting one of the players for the season.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

The Distance To Home

.

13: ERIC DINERSTEIN, „What Elephants know“

  • Mich irritiert die ‚Dschungelbuch‘-artige Hauptfigur, und mich stört, dass vor allem Autoren aus dem Westen Kinderbücher über andere Kulturkreise schreiben. Trotzdem: Ein solide recherchierter Tier- und Abenteuer-Roman?

„Abandoned in the jungle of the Nepalese Borderlands, two-year-old Nandu is found living under the protective watch of a pack of wild dogs. Fate delivers him to the King’s elephant stable, where he is raised by unlikely parents-wise, fierce and affectionate elephants. When the king’s government threatens to close the stable, Nandu, now twelve, searches for a way to save his family and community.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

What Elephants Know

.
14: KATE MESSNER, „The Seventh Wish“
  • Mich langweilen „Du hast Wünsche frei!“-Plots, bei denen alle Wünsche schief gehen. Doch auf den ersten Blick wirkt das hier süffig, einladend, gekonnt.

„Charlie feels like she’s always coming in last. From her Mom’s new job to her sister’s life at college, everything seems more important than her. While ice fishing, Charlie discovers a floppy fish offering to grant a wish.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

The Seventh Wish

.

15: M.G. HENNESSEY, „The Other Boy“

  • Schön, dass statt „Wie werde ich ein Junge?“ hier „Ich bin bereits als Junge akzeptiert. Wie halte ich diesen Status?“ das Grundproblem zu sein scheint:

„A transgender boy’s journey toward acceptance: Twelve-year-old Shane loves pitching for his baseball team, working on his graphic novel, and hanging out with his best friend, Josh. But Shane is keeping something private, something that might make a difference to his teammates, to Josh, and to his new crush, Madeline. And when a classmate threatens to reveal his secret, Shane’s whole world comes crashing down.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

The Other Boy

.

16: BEN HATKE, „Mighty Jack“ (Graphic Novel)

  • Simple, aber sehr stilsicher gezeichnete Graphic Novel bei der ich (wie so oft) die Familienprobleme und die Alltagswelt interessanter finde als die Fantasy-Räume, die sich plötzlich darin öffnen.

„Summer is when his single mom takes a second job and leaves Jack at home to watch his autistic kid sister, Maddy. It’s a lot of responsibility, and it’s boring, too, because Maddy doesn’t talk. Ever. But then, one day at the flea market, Maddy does talk—to tell Jack to trade their mom’s car for a box of mysterious seeds. What starts as a normal little garden out back behind the house quickly grows up into a wild, magical jungle with tiny onion babies running amok, huge, pink pumpkins that bite, and, on one moonlit night that changes everything…a dragon“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

Mighty Jack (Mighty Jack, #1)

.

17: ELLY SWARTZ, „Finding Perfect“

  • Die platte Comedy und die vielen Gender-Klischees auf deutschen Poetry Slams langweilen mich. US-Slams kenne ich nicht. Trotzdem würde ich lieber mehr über Zwangsstörungen lesen – als über die… befreiende Kraft von Poesie-Wettbewerben:

„Molly’s mother left the family to take a faraway job with the promise to return in one year. Molly knows that promises are often broken, so she hatches a plan to bring her mother home: Win the Lakeville Middle School Slam Poetry Contest. The winner is honored at a fancy banquet with table cloths. Molly’s sure her mother would never miss that. Right…?But as time goes on, writing and reciting slam poetry become harder. Actually, everything becomes harder as new habits appear, and counting, cleaning, and organizing are not enough to keep Molly’s world from spinning out of control.“ [Klappentext, minimal gekürzt]

Finding Perfect

.

18: WESLEY KING, “OCDaniel”

“A boy whose life revolves around hiding his obsessive compulsive disorder. Daniel spends football practice perfectly arranging water cups—and hoping no one notices, especially his best friend Max, and Raya, the prettiest girl in school. His life gets weirder when another girl at school, who is unkindly nicknamed Psycho Sara, notices him for the first time.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

OCDaniel

.

19: MELANIE CONKLIN, “Counting Thyme”

  • Ein Mädchen, das nach New York zieht… und die Provinz vermisst: Ich mag, dass hier verhältnismäßig kleine Alltagssorgen sehr ernst genommen werden.

“Eleven-year-old Thyme’s little brother is accepted into a new cancer drug trial and the Owens family has to move to New York, thousands of miles away from everything she knows and loves. Thyme loves her brother—she’d give anything for him to be well—but she still wants to go home. She finds herself even more mixed up when her heart feels the tug of new friends, a first crush, and even a crotchety neighbor and his sweet whistling bird.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

Counting Thyme

.

20: LINDSAY EAGAR, “Hour of the Bees”

  • Magischer Realismus, Familiengeheimnisse, ein schrulliger Opa: die Zutaten sind mir zu altbacken. Aber: sehr gut geschrieben!

“Twelve-year-old Carolina is in New Mexico, helping her parents move the grandfather she’s never met into a home for people with dementia. At first, Carol avoids prickly Grandpa Serge… A novel of family and discovering the wonder of the world.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

Hour of the Bees

.

fünf ältere Titel (2013 bis 2015), jetzt erst entdeckt:

2015: STEPHANIE TROMLY, „Trouble is a Friend of mine“

„The first time Philip Digby shows up on Zoe’s doorstep, he’s rude and treats her like a book he’s already read and knows the ending to. But before she knows it, Zoe’s allowed Digby—annoying, brilliant, and somehow…attractive? Digby—to drag her into a series of dangerous and only vaguely legal schemes all related to the kidnapping of a local teenage girl. Is Digby a hero? Or is his manic quest an attempt to repair his own broken family and exorcize his obsessive-compulsive tendencies?“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

Trouble Is a Friend of Mine (Trouble, #1)

.

2015: EMMA CARROLL, „In Darkling Wood“

  • Märchen-Klischees und ein Klischee-Cover – doch die Geschichte wirkt behutsam, stimmungsvoll, gekonnt erzählt.

„When Alice’s brother gets a chance for a heart transplant, Alice is bundled off to her estranged grandmother’s house. There’s nothing good about staying with Nell, except for the beautiful Darkling Wood at the end of her garden – but Nell wants to have it cut down. Alice feels at home there, at peace, and even finds a friend, Flo. But Flo doesn’t seem to go to the local school and no one in town has heard of a girl with that name. When Flo shows Alice the surprising secrets of Darkling Wood, Alice starts to wonder, what is real? And can she find out in time to save the wood from destruction?“ [Klappentext, minimal gekürzt]

In Darkling Wood

..

2014: KSENIA ANSKE, „Rosehead“
  • Absurder Plot, schwarzer Humor… ich bin nur skeptisch, inwieweit das „Berlin“ im Buch authentisch/stimmig wirken kann.

„Misunderstood and overmedicated, twelve-year-old Lilith finds the prospect of a grand family reunion dull… until she discovers that the rose garden surrounding her grandfather’s Berlin mansion is completely carnivorous. Armed with Panther, her talking pet whippet, and the help of the mute boy next door, Lilith must unravel the secrets behind the mysterious estate, all while her family remains gloriously unaware that they are about to be devoured.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

Rosehead

.

2014: SARA CASSIDY, „Skylark“

  • Toller Tonfall, interessante Familie – nur: Slam Poetry? Ich bin skeptisch.

„Angie lives in an old car with her brother and mother. Homeless after their father left, the family tries to live as normally as possible between avoiding the police and finding new places to park each night. When Angie discovers slam poetry, she finds a new way to express herself and find meaning and comfort in a confusing world.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

Skylark

.

2013: MANDY HAGER, „Dear Vincent“

  • Neuseeländischer Roman über Selbstmord/Depressionen. Ich weiß nicht genau, warum das Mädchen Van Gogh UND einen Professor als wichtigste Bezugsfiguren hat, und fürchte mich vor Mansplaining und romantisiertem Künstler-Bla.

„17 year old Tara shares the care of her paralysed father with her domineering, difficult mother. She’s still grieving the loss of her older sister Van, who died five years before. And she is enamoured with Vincent Van Gogh and finds many parallels between the tragic story of his life and her own. Then, she meets Professor Max Stockhamer, a Jewish refugee and philosopher and his grandson Johannes.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt]

Dear Vincent

Die besten Bücher von Frauen: Literatur, 2016

neue Bücher 2016

.

Jedes Jahr lese ich die ersten Seiten von ca. 3000 Romanen: Klassiker und Geheimtipps, Literatur und Unterhaltung… und möglichst viele Neuerscheinungen, auf Deutsch und Englisch.

Viele Bücher, deren Leseproben mich überzeugten, stelle ich in kurzen Listen vor – zuletzt zu Themen wie „Jugendbücher 2016“, „Literatur zu Flucht, Krieg und Vertreibung“, „Krimis 2016“ oder „feministische Science-Fiction“.

Heute – sehr weit gefasst, aber nicht wahllos:

zehn Bücher von Frauen, erschienen 2016 – angelesen, vorgemerkt, gemocht.

.

Zum Einstieg:

6 aktuelle Bücher von Frauen, die ich komplett las – und sehr empfehlen kann.

Adieu, mein Kind Schnell, dein Leben Nach einer wahren Geschichte: Roman Liebe ist nicht genug - Ich bin die Mutter eines Amokläufers Der Pfau Ms. Marvel, Vol. 1: No Normal

.

zehn englischsprachige Titel – angelesen und gemocht:

.

01: Zadie Smith, „Swing Time“

  • 453 Seiten, November 2016, Großbritannien
  • Seit fast 15 Jahren lese ich Bücher von Smith an – und lege sie zur Seite, weil sie mir zu bürgerlich-britisch-gesetzt scheinen. Hier fesseln/überzeugen mich die ersten Seiten: ambitionierte Frauen, und eine komplizierte Freundschaft.

„Two brown girls dream of being dancers – but only one, Tracey, has talent. The other has ideas: about rhythm and time, about black bodies and black music. A close but complicated childhood friendship that ends abruptly in their early twenties. Moving from North-West London to West Africa, Swing Time is an exuberant dance to the music of time.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Swing Time
.

02: Alice Hoffman, „Faithful“
  • 258 Seiten, November 2016, USA
  • Klingt nach schlimmem Kitsch: ein Engel? Aber: hoher Ton, magischer Realismus, vielleicht ein klug existenzieller Mainstream-Schmöker.

„Growing up on Long Island, an extraordinary tragedy changes Shelby Richmond’s fate. Her best friend’s future is destroyed in an accident, while Shelby walks away with the burden of guilt and has to fight her way back to her own future. In New York City she finds a circle of lost and found souls—including an angel who’s been watching over her.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Faithful

.

03: Rachel Cusk, „Transit“

  • 272 Seiten, September 2016, Großbritannien
  • Band 1 der Trilogie war mir zu trocken. Doch ich mag die Idee, über die Zeit nach einer Trennung zu schreiben – nicht vor allem über das Zerbrechen der Ehe zuvor.

„The stunning second novel of a trilogy that began with Outline (2015): In the wake of family collapse, a writer and her two young sons move to London. A penetrating and moving reflection on childhood and fate, the value of suffering and the moral problems of personal responsibility. A precise, short, and yet epic cycle of novels.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Transit

.

04: Eimear McBride, „The Lesser Bohemians“

  • 320 Seiten, September 2016, Irland/Großbritannien
  • Avantgarde-Autorin, in die ich seit „A Girl is a half-formed thing“ große Hoffnungen setze: Ich mag, wie simpel und bodenständig der Plot hier wirkt – erwarte aber viele Stil- und Perspektiv-Experimente.

„Upon her arrival in mid-1990s London, an 18-year-old Irish girl begins anew as a drama student. She struggles to fit in—she’s young and unexotic, a naive new girl in the big city. Then she meets an attractive older man. He’s an established actor, 20 years older, and an inevitable clamorous relationship ensues.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

The Lesser Bohemians

.

05: Angela Palm, „Riverine“

  • 224 Seiten, August 2016, USA
  • Klingt sehr dick auftragen: Bei 400 Seiten wäre ich skeptisch. Aber 224? Das könnte klappen:

„Angela Palm grew up in a house set on the banks of a river that had been straightened to make way for farmland. Every year, the Kankakee River in rural Indiana flooded and returned to its old course while the residents sandbagged their homes against the rising water. From her bedroom window, Palm watched the neighbor boy and loved him in secret. As an adult Palm finds herself drawn back. This means visiting the prison where the boy that she loved is serving a life sentence for a brutal murder. Mesmerizing, interconnected essays about what happens when a single event forces the path of her life off course.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Riverine: A Memoir from Anywhere But Here

.

06: Natashia Deón, „Grace“

  • 400 Seiten, Juni 2016, USA
  • Historienschmöker, vielleicht unrealistisch verschachtelt. Aber: Figuren, wie ich sie noch nicht kenne!

„A runaway slave in the 1840s south is on the run: Fifteen-year-old Naomi escapes the brutal confines of life on an Alabama plantation and must take refuge in a Georgia brothel run by a freewheeling, gun-toting Jewish madam named Cynthia. There, Naomi falls into a star-crossed love affair with a smooth-talking white man named Jeremy who frequents the brothel’s dice tables all too often. The product of Naomi and Jeremy’s union is Josey, whose white skin and blonde hair mark her as different from the other slave children on the plantation. Josey soon becomes caught in the tide of history when news of the Emancipation Proclamation reaches the declining estate. Grace is a sweeping, intergenerational saga featuring a group of outcast women during one of the most compelling eras in American history.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Grace: A Novel

.

07: Ashley Sweeney, „Eliza Waite“

  • 327 Seiten, Mai 2016, USA
  • Dass die Figur ausgerechnet Bäckerin wird, scheint mir bieder. Aber: Gutes Setting, schöner Ton, und nicht zu lang/dick.

„After the tragic death of her husband and son on a remote island in Washington’s San Juan Islands, Eliza Waite joins the throng of miners, fortune hunters, business owners, con men, and prostitutes traveling north to the Klondike in the spring of 1898. In Alaska, Eliza opens a successful bakery on Skagway’s main street and befriends a madam at a neighboring bordello. Occupying this space―a place somewhere between traditional and nontraditional feminine roles―Eliza awakens emotionally and sexually. Part diary, part recipe file, and part Gold Rush history, Eliza Waite transports readers to the sights, sounds, smells, and tastes of a raucous and fleeting era of American history.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Eliza Waite: A Novel
.

08: Lucy Knisley, „Something New“

  • 304 Seiten, Mai 2016, USA
  • Graphic Novel in sympathisch schlichtem, aber vielleicht zu naiven Stil: Jedes Mal, wenn ich in die persönlichen Erlebnisberichte Knisleys blättere, habe ich Lust, alles sofort zu lesen. Aber: Vielen Leuten bleibt es zu flach, süßlich, halbfertig.

„A funny and whip-smart new book about the institution of marriage in America told through the lens of her recent engagement and wedding…. The graphic novel tackles the all-too-common wedding issues that go along with being a modern woman: feminism, expectations, getting knocked over the head with gender stereotypes, family drama, and overall wedding chaos and confusion.“ [Klappentext, ungekürzt.]

Something New: Tales from a Makeshift Bride
.

09: Jessi Klein, „You’ll grow out of it“

  • 291 Seiten, Juli 2016, USA
  • Spaß-Feminismus-Plauder-Memoir, vielleicht zu angepasst und erwartbar. Erstmal aber: eine angenehme, gewitzte Stimme.

„As both a tomboy and a late bloomer, comedian Jessi Klein grew up feeling more like an outsider than a participant in the rites of modern femininity. A relentlessly funny yet poignant take on a variety of topics she has experienced along her strange journey to womanhood and beyond, including her „transformation from Pippi Longstocking-esque tomboy to are-you-a-lesbian-or-what tom man,“ and attempting to find watchable porn.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

You'll Grow Out of It
.

10: Theresa Larson, „Warrior“

  • 272 Seiten, April 2016, USA
  • Hier habe ich Angst vor Ideologien: Army-Begeisterung, „G.I. Jane“-Feminismus, übertriebene Militärbegeisterung. Trotz schlimmem Cover und schlimmem Titel aber klingt diese Lebensgeschichte kantig/interessant, und stilistisch bin ich positiv überrascht.

„At ten, Theresa Lawson was a caregiver to her dying mother. As a young adult, a beauty pageant contestant and model. And as a grown woman, a high-achieving Lieutenant in the Marines, in charge of an entire platoon while deployed in Iraq. Meanwhile, she was battling bulimia nervosa, an internal struggle which ultimately cut short her military service when she was voluntarily evacuated from combat. Theresa’s journey to wellness required the bravery to ask for help, to take care of herself first, and abandon the idea of “perfect.”“ [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Warrior: A Memoir
.

Bonus: drei Titel von 2015, die mir erst jetzt auffielen:
.

1: Sandra Cisneros, „A House of my own. Stories from my Life“

  • 400 Seiten, Oktober 2015, USA
  • Essays einer Baby-Boomerin, Second-Wave-Feminism. Ich mag ihren Ton – aber habe Angst, die meisten Gedanken schon zehnmal gehört zu haben.

„A richly illustrated compilation of true stories and nonfiction pieces that, taken together, form a jigsaw autobiography: From the Chicago neighborhoods where she grew up and set her groundbreaking The House on Mango Street to her abode in Mexico, the places Sandra Cisneros has lived have provided inspiration for her now-classic works of fiction and poetry. Ranging from the private (her parents‘ loving and tempestuous marriage) to the political (a rallying cry for one woman’s liberty in Sarajevo) to the literary (a tribute to Marguerite Duras), and written with her trademark sensitivity and honesty, these poignant, unforgettable pieces give us not only her most transformative memories but also a revelation of her artistic and intellectual influences.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

A House of My Own: Stories from My Life

.

2: Wendi Stewart, „Meadowlark“ (dt: „Ein unbesiegbarer Sommer“, 2016)

  • 336 Seiten, Kanada 2015. (Deutsch bei Nagel & Kimche)
  • Kanadische Coming-of-Age-Romane reden manchmal viel zu lange nur über Natur, Schnee und Wildnis-/Jäger-/Farm-Melancholie. Eine Freundin fand das Buch mittelmäßig. Ich bleibe vorsichtig optimistisch:

„Als das Auto der Familie Archer in Kanada durchs Eis eines gefrorenen Sees bricht, kann Robert einzig seine Tochter retten. Rebecca kümmert sich allein um den Haushalt und die Farm, der Vater kapselt sich ab. Trost findet sie in der Freundschaft mit Chuck, einem empfindsamen, von seinem Vater tyrannisierten Jungen, und mit Lissie, die von einer perfektionistischen Adoptivmutter gegängelt wird.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Ein unbesiegbarer Sommer

.

3: Yeonmi Park, „In Order to Live“ (dt: „Mut zur Freiheit. Meine Flucht aus Nordkorea“, 2015)

„Yeonmi Park träumte nicht von der Freiheit, als sie im Alter von erst 13 Jahren aus Nordkorea floh. Sie wusste nicht einmal, was Freiheit ist. Alles, was sie wusste war, dass sie und ihre Familie sterben würde, wenn sie bliebe—vor Hunger, an einer Krankheit oder gar durch Exekution. Sie erzählt von ihrer grauenhaften Odyssee durch die chinesische Unterwelt, bevölkert von Schmugglern und Menschenhändlern, bis nach Südkorea; und sie erzählt von ihrem erstaunlichen Weg zur führenden Menschenrechts-Aktivistin mit noch nicht einmal 21 Jahren.“ [Klappentext, minimal gekürzt.]

Mut zur Freiheit: Meine Flucht aus Nordkorea

.

…und drei überzeugende, aktuelle Titel von Männern (alle 2016): 
.

1: Tim Murphy, „Christodora“

  • 496 Seiten, August 2016, USA
  • ich bin skeptisch beim aktuellen schwulen New-York-Epos „A Little Life“, ich bin skeptisch beim aktuellen schwulen New-York-Epos „City on Fire“… aber hier, beim dritten Buch dieses (Mini-)Trends, war ich nach zwei Seiten begeistert: genauer Blick, obskure Details, überraschende Figuren.
  • ein schlechtes Zeiten: die sympathische, doch nicht besonders gut geschriebene Reportage von Tim Murphy über seine eigene HIV-Infektion bei Buzzfeed.

„A diverse set of characters whose fates intertwine in an iconic building in Manhattan’s East Village, the Christodora: Milly and Jared, a privileged young couple with artistic ambitions. Their neighbor, Hector, a Puerto Rican gay man who was once a celebrated AIDS activist but is now a lonely addict, and Milly and Jared’s adopted son Mateo. As the junkies and protestors of the 1980s give way to the hipsters of the 2000s and they, in turn, to the wealthy residents of the crowded, glass-towered city of the 2020s, enormous changes rock their personal lives. Christodora recounts the heartbreak wrought by AIDS, illustrates the allure and destructive power of hard drugs, and brings to life the ever-changing city itself“ [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Christodora

.

2: Colson Whitehead, „The Underground Railroad“

  • 306 Seiten, August 2016, USA
  • Whitehead vermischt oft Gesellschaftskritik mit satirischen Fantasy-Elementen und absurdem World-Building. Manchmal wird mir das zu läppisch oder gewollt – doch er gewann hierfür den National Book Award, und die Leseprobe überzeugte mich:

„Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. In Whitehead’s ingenious conception, the Underground Railroad is no mere metaphor – engineers and conductors operate a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil. Ridgeway, the relentless slave catcher, is close on their heels. The Underground Railroad is at once a kinetic adventure tale of one woman’s ferocious will to escape the horrors of bondage and a shattering, powerful meditation on the history we all share.“ [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

The Underground Railroad

.

3: Richard Russo: „Everybody’s Fool“ (dt. „Diese gottverdammten Träume“, 2016)

  • 306 Seiten, August 2016, USA (Deutsch: hier, Dumont)
  • Bisher war mir Russos Kleinstadt- und Altmänner-Romantik immer zu süßlich. Im besten Fall aber kann mich das hier darüber hinweg trösten, dass John Updike keine neuen „Rabbit“-Romane mehr schreiben kann:

„Richard Russo returns to North Bath, in upstate New York, and the characters he created in Nobody’s Fool. The irresistible Sully, who in the intervening years has come by some unexpected good fortune, is staring down a VA cardiologist’s estimate that he has only a year or two left, and it’s hard work trying to keep this news from the most important people in his life: Ruth, the married woman he carried on with for years – and Sully’s son and grandson, for whom he was mostly an absentee figure (and now a regretful one).“ [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Everybody's Fool
.

DSCF6180

2016: Die besten neuen Bücher – Herbst, Frankfurter Buchmesse & Weihnachten

im Bild: der 'Berliner Büchertisch', Mehringdamm 51

(im Bild: der ‚Berliner Büchertisch‘, Mehringdamm 51)

.

angelesen, vorgemerkt, entdeckt: meine Vorauswahl der literarischen Neuerscheinungen in der zweiten Jahreshälfte 2016 – neue Bücher für die Zeit zwischen Spätsommer, Frankfurter Buchmesse und Weihnachten.

Jeden Winter suche ich Romane / Neuerscheinungen und mache eine erste Liste für die Bücher des Jahres:

Hier meine Auswahl für Herbst und Winter 2016. Ergänzungen / Empfehlungen sind willkommen – vielen Dank! Blogpost noch vorläufig – ich stelle die Titel nochmal in ganzen Sätzen vor. 

.

zehn aktuelle Romane (2016), gelesen und gemocht: Empfehlungen!

.

19 Titel – angelesen und gemocht: [ausführliche Vorstellung kommt!]

Sachbuch:

Jugendbuch:

.

neue deutsche / deutschsprachige Titel:

.

rammstedt schenk zschokke

07-25 Tilman Rammstedt, „Morgen mehr“

07-28 Sylvie Schenk, „Schnell, dein Leben“

08-00 Matthias Zschokke, „Die Wolken waren groß und zogen da oben hin“

.

Iris Blauensteiner, Thomas Lang, Andreas Maier

o8-01 Iris Blauensteiner, „Kopfzecke“

08-01 Thomas Lang, „Immer nach Hause“

08-08 Andreas Maier, „Der Kreis“

.

Paula Fürstenberg, Reinhard Kaiser-Mühlecker, Ernst-Wilhelm Händler

08-11 Paula Fürstenberg, „Familie der geflügelten Tiger“

08-25 Reinhard Kaiser-Mühlecker, „Fremde Seele, dunkler Wald“

08-25 Ernst-Wilhelm Händler, „München“

.

Eugen Ruge, Thomas Melle, Margarete Stokowski

08-26 Eugen Ruge, „Follower“

08-26 Thomas Melle, „Die Welt im Rücken“

08-26 Margarete Stokowski, „Untenrum frei“

.

Jan Kuhlbrodt, Christian Geissler, Gerhard Falkner

08-31 Jan Kuhlbrodt, „Das Modell“

09-00 Christian Geissler, „Das Brot mit der Feile“

09-01 Gerhard Falkner, „Apollokalypse“

.

Silke Scheuermann, Dietmar Dath, Christian Kracht

09-06 Silke Scheuermann, „Wovon wir lebten“

09-07 Dietmar Dath, „Superhelden“: gelesen. leider sehr verquast/für Nicht-Comic-Kenner schwer zugänglich. 3 von 5 Sternen.

09-08 Christian Kracht, „Die Toten“

.

Linus Reichlin, Philipp Winkler, Julia Zange

09-16 Julius Reichlin, „Manitoba“

09-19 Philipp Winkler, „Hool“

10-17 Julia Zange, „Realitätsgewitter“

.

Dirk Stermann, Max Goldt, Anna Kim

10-21 Dirk Stermann, „Der Junge bekommt das Gute zuletzt“

10-21 Max Goldt, „Lippen abwischen und lächeln“

01-16 Anna Kim, „Die große Heimkehr“

 

vielversprechende Übersetzungen – neu auf Deutsch:

 

Francoise Frenkel, Anne-Laure Bondoux, Anton Hansen Tammsaare.png

07-28 Francoise Frenkel, „Nichts, um sein Haupt zu betten“ [bei Goodreads: 4.31 von 5]

07-28 Anne-Laure Bondoux, Jean-Claude Mourlevat, „Lügen Sie, ich werde Ihnen glauben“ [bei Goodreads: 3.83 von 5]

08-00 Anton Hansen Tammsaare, „Das Leben und die Liebe“ [bei Goodreads: 3.86 von 5]

.

Hakan Gunday, Delphine de Vigan, Sophie Daull, Juan Pablo Villalobos.png

08-01 Hakan Günday, „Flucht“ [bei Goodreads: 4.03 von 5]

08-17 Delphine de Vigan, „Nach einer wahren Geschichte“ [bei Goodreads: 4.03 von 5]

09-00 Sophie Daull, „Adieu, mein Kind“ [bei Goodreads: 4.26 von 5]

09-01 Juan Villalobos, „Ich verkauf dir einen Hund“ [bei Goodreads: 4.26 von 5]

.

Kees van Beijnum, Dola de Jong, Eduardo Halfon

09-01 Kees van Beijnum, „Die Zerbrechlichkeit der Welt“ [bei Goodreads: 3.79 von 5]

09-14 Dola de Jong, „Das Feld in der Fremde“ [bei Goodreads: 3.95 von 5]

09-26 Eduardo Halfon, „Signor Hoffman“ [bei Goodreads: 3.80 von 5]

.

Banana Yoshimoto, Adriaan van Dis, Mark Frost & Twin Peaks.png

09-28 Banana Yoshimoto, „Lebensgeister“

10-04 Adriaan van Dis, „Das verborgene Leben meiner Mutter“ [bei Goodreads: 3.76 von 5]

10-18 Mark Frost, „Twin Peaks: die geheime Geschichte“ [bei Goodreads: noch kaum Bewertungen]

.

Ian McEwan, Jonathan Safran Foer, Viktor Remizov.png

10-26 Ian McEwan, „Nussschale“ [bei Goodreads: noch kaum Bewertungen]

11-10 Jonathan Safran Foer, „Hier bin ich“ [bei Goodreads: 3.63 von 5]

11-11 Viktor Remizov, „Asche und Staub“ [bei Goodreads: 3.90 von 5]

.

Seit 2012 erstelle ich diese Übersicht Anfang Oktober.

Dieses Jahr sah ich schon Ende Juni die Herbst-/Winterprogramme deutschsprachiger Verlage durch. Das liegt an Ilja Regier vom Literaturblog Muromez – der alle Vorschauen sammelte, verlinkte und mir das Blättern leicht machte. Hier seine eigene Vorauswahl: „Verlangen schlägt Vernunft. Herbstvorschau ’16“

Übersichten außerdem bei:

.

neue Bücher 2016, Stefan Mesch