Literarisches Colloquium Berlin

Queer Young Adult Literature, 2016: Raziel Reid

Raziel Reid

Raziel Reid

.

Raziel Reid is a Canadian novelist and journalist living in Vancouver – and he both spoke and read at the 2016 “Empfindlichkeiten” Literature Festival in Berlin.

His young adult novel „When everything feels like the movies“ (2014) was awarded the 2014 Governor General’s Literature Award for Children’s Literature. The German edition, „Movie Star“ was published by Albino (2016).

Raziel’s Web Site  |  Raziel’s Twitter  |  Wikipedia  |  Instagram

.

01_If someone call you „homosexual author“, you…

Show them how well I can hold a pen with my asshole.

.

02_The most memorable moment of queerness in your childhood:

As a child I had an affair with a neighbour boy. The experience made its way into my novel Movie Star. He lived next door to my grandparents who were very religious. While my grandmother was upstairs in the kitchen baking pies for church charity events, he and I would be downstairs in the basement “playing”. We were nine or ten years old. There was a small fear that we might be caught, so we knew we were doing something worthy of getting in trouble for, but there was no shame. It was before society had gotten into our heads and made us self-conscious. It was instinctual and very passionate. I loved him.

.

03_A queer book that influenced you (how?)…

„Faggots“ by Larry Kramer was a quite stunning moment of my youth and inspired me to move to New York City. It introduced me to the queer underground world and helped me realize my life could be much more than what I’d been raised to believe it could be as a God-fearing Catholic boy. Kramer became my new God, and I’ve been a faithful disciple ever since.

.

04_A different piece of queer culture (no book: something else) that influenced you (how?)…

I remember when Will & Grace started airing on TV in the ‘90s. It was the first time I’d seen gay characters. I knew I was gay but wasn’t yet comfortable with my identity. It was both a liberating and shameful experience. I grew up in a small Canadian town. My dad was so uncomfortable when Will & Grace came on he’d leave the room. My mom seemed to like Will, but was embarrassed by the more flamboyant character Jack. Early on it was in my head that it’s better to be a more “straight acting” gay guy like Will than to be effeminate like Jack, an idea which is still perpetuated today. So many gay guys on hookup apps are looking for “straight acting only” and “no fems”.

.

05_In book stores, THESE are the authors/artists that you’d feel most honored to be placed next to:

Chuck Palahniuk, Ira Levin, Dennis Cooper, the Bible.

.

06_A queer moment you’ve had in Berlin (or anywhere in Germany) that you’ll remember for a long time:

I spent this spring in Berlin, and during my first week here I attended the launch of Matt Lambert’s zine Vitium, which was published by my german publisher Bruno Gmünder. The launch was at Tom’s Bar which is rather infamous, and so I was introduced to the underground scene in Berlin and its artists while watching a live sex show. Quite memorable. I think I’ll have a live sex show at all my future launches!

.

07_Name some experts, authors, activists, name some places, institutions and discourses/debates that formed/informed/influenced the way you see and understand queerness – and yourself:

During my youth Warhol’s factory was the first queer scene I became interested in. Warhol said, “In my movies, everyone’s in love with Joe Dallesandro” and everyone watching was too! I loved reading about all the Superstars and was emboldened by characters like Candy Darling and Holly Woodlawn. I felt like such a freak in my hometown, and they celebrated their freakiness — it’s what made them shine.

.

08_Name some experts, authors, activists, places, institutions and debates/questions that deserve more recognition/need more love:

I recently read One-Man Show by Michael Schreiber which is composed of interviews with the 20th century New York artist Bernard Perlin. He was a fascinating personality and visionary, I enjoyed learning about his life very much. He was connected to many other queer figures like Paul Cadmus, Glenway Wescott, George Platt Lynes, Denham Fouts, and had interesting anecdotes to share about them all. Perlin is underrepresented. He evaved the AIDS plague while living in Greenwich Village when it first hit that community. His survival alone is heroic and worthy of investigation. I’m fascinated by tales from gay artists who lived through the epidemic. The amount of loss they’ve experienced, and the way it shaped them and their work is something which should always be honoured.

.

09_Is there a queer figure/personality, a celebrity or a queer story/phenomenom that is very visible in the mainstream culture – and that makes you happy BECAUSE it is so visible?

James Franco is cool. He transcends sexual orientation which is very Hollywood, many people in the industry have fluid sexualities but they’re not all as open and willing to promote it the way he does out of fear of losing out on roles.

.

10_If universities/academics talk about queer topics, you often think…

If only they had an imagination.

.

11_A person (or, more general: an aspect of personality or appearance) that you find very sexy?

Gore Vidal because he stood up for what he believed in, and even when his beliefs were attacked or garnered him negative attention (as they often did), he didn’t back down. I admire his style.

.

12_Are you queer? How does your queerness inform/relate to/energize your art? And, on the other hand: Has your queerness ever been in your way or be a difficulty for you?

I’m privileged to be from a progressive country, Canada – where my sexuality has helped propel my career forward. My first job as a writer was for a queer newspaper, my debut novel is an LGBT teen story and was originally published by a Canadian press known for its queer content and run by two gay men. My sexuality has served as a foundation for my literary work.

.

13_There’s a video campaign that wants to prevent depressed queer teenagers from commiting suicide, „It gets better“. DOES it get better? How and for whom? When did it get better for you? What has to get better still?

“It” doesn’t get better. This world will always try to hurt you. What gets better is you. As you get older and find your footing you become wiser and more resilient.

.o

all my 2016 interviews on Queer Literature:

…and, in German:

Kuratoren & Experten am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin: 

Queer Literature: „Empfindlichkeiten“ Festival 2016:

Advertisements

Thorsten Dönges – Künstlerische Leitung des queeren Literaturfestivals „Empfindlichkeiten“, Literarisches Colloquium Berlin

Thorsten Dönges, Literarisches Colloquium Berlin, Foto von Mandy Seidler

Thorsten Dönges, Literarisches Colloquium Berlin, Foto von Mandy Seidler

.

In all times men have been in love with men, women with women.

As E.M. Forster wrote: „There always have been people like me and there always will be“.

Christopher Isherwood called EM Forster the great prophet of our tribe. So have these people really aways been forming one tribe? One community? Or is it much more complicated?

I am glad that so many writers, scientists, translators, friends are joining our festival „Empfindlichkeiten“. In our times, there is maybe something many [queer] people might have in common. It is the experience of what we call Coming Out – and usually you don´t tell your Mama: „Listen, Mama, I am hetero, but don´t be sad or angry…”

Maybe these people even in our days are the people who know how it feels to look different or to walk hand in hand with another person and to be afraid of hostile reactions. There still is homophobia and there is transphobia – in Africa, Russia and Orlando. And in Europe, Germany and Berlin.

We have asked the participants of this festival, writers and scientists, to write short essays on our subject. Many of the essays we received reflect on political questions, on history and they think about which writers could be part of a kind of queer literary tradition. And there is the discussion, how integrated and normalized – or how dissident, subversive and radical queer life should be these days.

…and let me celebrate those who have made this festival possible, with their work, their enthusiasm, their help:
Thank you Samanta Gorzelniak. Christine Wagner, Laura Ott. Mandy Seidler. Samuel Matzner. Yann Stutzig. Ronny Matthes. Christian Schmidt. Thank you Florian Höllerer. Thank you, dear colleagues. Thank you Siegessäule for being our media partner! Thank you: JAK Slovenian Book Agency, Pro Helvetia. Canadian Embassy. Antidiskriminierungsstelle des Bundes. S Fischer Stiftung. Kulturstiftung des Bundes

Thorsten Dönges‘ opening speech – shortened version

.

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 16.07.2016, Berlin. Foto von Tobias Bohm.

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 16.07.2016, Berlin. Foto von Tobias Bohm.

.Th

Thorsten Dönges, geboren 1974 in Gießen, studierte Germanistik und Geschichte in Bamberg. Seit 2000 ist er Mitarbeiter des Literarischen Colloquiums Berlin, wo er im Programmbereich insbesondere für die neuere deutschsprachige Literatur zuständig ist.

.

Ich habe das Literaturfestival „Empfindlichkeiten“ als Liveblogger begleitet; und sprach kurz vor Eröffnung mit Thorsten Dönges über Vorgeschichte und Ursprünge des Programms. Samanta Gorzelniak, Thorstens Partnerin in der Künstlerischen Leitung des Festivals, hat schriftlich auf meine Fragen geantwortet (Link hier). Mit Thorsten hatte ich ein zwangloses Gespräch. Hier ein – gekürztes – Protokoll/Transkript:

.

Thorsten Dönges: Vor ein paar Jahren las ein Münchner Schriftsteller, Hans Pleschinski, hier am LCB aus seinem Thomas-Mann-Roman “Ludwigshöhe”. Es geht um alles Mögliche: Düsseldorf, die Aufarbeitung deutscher Vergangenheit… und eben auch: eine schwule Liebesgeschichte. Am nächsten Tag stand ich in der LCB-Küche. Und ein Kollege sagte, ganz freundlich: “Das war ja ein schwuler Abend, gestern.”

Da machte es Klack. Niemand würde nach einem Abend, bei dem ein Buch mit heterosexueller Liebesgeschichte vorgestellt wird, sagen: “Was für ein Hetero-Abend gestern. Schon spannend!” Mir wurde klar, dass die Rezeption einfach anders ist – und damit sicher auch der Schreibprozess. Autoren fragen sich: “Für wen schreibe ich das? Wer wäre vielleicht sogar dagegen, falls in meinem Roman ein Frauenpaar auftaucht?” Was macht das mit dem Text – mit der Produktion, und mit der Rezeption?

Es gab so viele Abstimmungen in den letzten Jahren: Ein Land führt die Ehe für alle ein. Andere lehnen sie ab. Schriftsteller beobachten das sehr wach. Sie nehmen daran teil – doch wie mischt man sich ein, als Autor? Dichter in Russland, deren Arbeit dann plötzlich als jugendgefährend gilt, als homosexuelle Propaganda… das sind so unterschiedliche Arbeits- und Schreib-Bedingungen…

„Autorentreffen“, das heißt: 20 oder 30 Leute sitzen um einen Tisch und sagen “Mir geht es folgendermaßen, als lesbische Autorin” – “Mir geht es anders. Ich will gar nicht so sehr als lesbische Autorin wahrgenommen werden.” – “Ich aber sehr wohl! Ich kämpfe total.” Das fand ich spannend – aber nicht spannend genug. Also sagten wir: Wir machen ein Festival. Wo dieser Austausch vorkommt. Aber eben auch: Performances, Musik, Lesungen – ein größerer Rahmen.

Hubert Fichte fragt in „Die zweite Schuld“: Gibt es einen Stil der homosexuellen Literatur? Henry James, dieses indirekte Sprechen… und das ist unser Aufhänger, als These und kleine Provokation. Klar, dass niemand antwortet „Zeig mir fünf Zeilen eines Schriftstellers und ich weiß: Sie ist lesbisch – oder eine Hetera mit acht Kindern.“ Doch als Gedankenspiel, um die Diskussion zu öffnen, fand ich Fichtes Frage interessant. Warum überhaupt Fichte? Ich weiß: Er wird selten übersetzt und hat international wenig Einfluss. Aber seine Geschichte mit dem LCB… in „Die zweite Schuld“ gibt es dieses große Interview mit Walter Höllerer. Er schreibt über die Anfänge des Hauses und die etwas niedliche Art, eine Schreibschule zu installieren.

Was mich herausforderte: Fichte liebt die Provokation – und denkt, die sind dort eigentlich alle… Fichte hatte überall diesen Homophobie-Verdacht: bei Grass und all den Lehrern hier. Er konfrontiert sie alle damit. „Wie haltet ihr es eigentlich so mit Arschfickern?“ Das wäre ein Satz, den er benutzt hätte, 1963. Und gerade das wieder hier ins Haus reinzubringen, fand ich sehr…

Ich hätte gern noch Alan Hollinghurst hier gehabt: Er schreibt an einem neuen Buch und sagte sehr britisch-freundlich ab. Genauso Ali Smith. Murathan Mungan, der wichtigste… ein enfant terrible in der Türkei. Meine Ko-Kuratorin Samanta Gorzelniak und ich haben uns gut ergänzt. Uns beiden lagen Autor*innen am Herzen, die der andere noch gar nicht kannte. Ich selbst mag Gunther Geltingers Bücher und freue mich sehr, dass er dabei ist. Antje Rávic Strubels aktuelles Buch, „In den Wäldern des menschlichen Herzens“, ist großartig. Aber das ist gemein: Wenn ich jetzt einzelne heraushebe.

Ich hatte noch nie vor einem Projekt so viel Respekt – denn irgendjemand fühlt sich immer ausgeschlossen. Oder alle sagen: „Kalter Kaffee: Wir haben doch schon Gleichgestellung.“ Doch die Reaktionen und die Essays und Statements der eingeladenen Autor*innen fand ich großartig – wie viel Herzblut. Und auch, 2016: wie viel Ratlosigkeit.

Wir wollten anfangs ein europäisches Festival. Asien, das wäre nochmal ein ganz anderes… das hätte mich überfordert. Aber dann weitete es sich aus: Wir wollten nach Russland schauen. So kam Masha Gessen ins Spiel – die aber in New York lebt. Dann Ricardo Domeneck – der aus Brasilien kommt, aber in Berlin lebt. Das waren finanzielle Grenzen. Am Anfang schrieben wir von „europäischen Autor*innen“. Jetzt sind wir international. Man könnte auch Michael Cunningham aus den USA einladen. Leute aus Vietnam, Thailand. Wäre sicher spannend – was Japaner zu unseren Fragestellungen sagen. Ob man überhaupt Leute findet, die gern kämen.“

.o

all my 2016 interviews on Queer Literature:

…and, in German:

Kuratoren & Experten am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin: 

Queer Literature: “Empfindlichkeiten” Festival 2016:

Samanta Gorzelniak – Künstlerische Leitung des queeren Literaturfestivals „Empfindlichkeiten“, Literarisches Colloquium Berlin

ein schnelles Selfie von Samanta Gorzelniak am LCB

ein schnelles Selfie von Samanta Gorzelniak am LCB

.

Queere Literatur – aus Europa und der Welt: Vom 14. bis 16. Juli 2016 veranstaltet das Literarische Colloquium Berlin (LCB, am Wannsee) ein Festival zu Homosexualitäten – “Empfindlichkeiten” (mehr Infos in der Spex und auf der LCB-Website).

Ich begleite das Festival als Liveblogger… und stelle bis Sonntag mehreren Künstler*innen, Autor*innen und interessierten Besuchern kurze Fragen zu Queerness, Widerstand und dem Potenzial homosexueller Literatur.

bisher erschienen Interviews mit…

Katy Derbyshire (Link)  |  Kristof Magnusson (Link)  |  Angela Steidele (Link)  |  Hans Hütt (Link)  |  Hilary McCollum (Link)  |  Saleem Haddad (Link)  |  Luisgé Martin (Link)

…und, aus dem LCB-Team, Ronny Matthes (Link).

Samanta Gorzelniak und Thorsten Dönges sind die Künstlerische Leistung des Festivals.

Samanta Gorzelniak, geboren 1978 in Leipzig, ist promovierte Philologin. Sie übersetzt aus dem Polnischen und forscht über Autorinnen der polnischen Romantik. Samantas Website (Link)

.

01_Seit wann planst du – zusammen von mit Thorsten Dönges – das Festival?

Letztes Jahr fragte Thorsten, ob ich an der Konzeption usw. beteiligt sein will. Natürlich wollte ich! Thorsten als… ich sag mal: Buchmensch hat einen etwas anderen Zugang zum Thema als ich – ich habe eine literaturwissenschaftliche Sozialisierung und bin in einer anderen queeren Szene unterwegs, in anderen, sagen wir: Zusammenhängen. Aber unsere Schnittpunkte sind die Literatur – und das Nicht-Heteronormative. Und das ist eine gute Mischung!

.

02_Was war Grundidee und -Konzept?

Menschen aus möglichst verschiedenen Kontexten, die schreiben, intensiv lesen und Berührungspunkte / Erfahrungen mit queeren Themen haben, zusammenbringen – und sie miteinander reden, einander kennen lernen zu lassen. Die Gemeinsamkeiten ausloten und sich an Differenzen freuen. Vernetzung. Ich glaube, dass unsere Gäste sich verschiedene Fragen stellen und unterschiedliche Dinge für überholt, aktuell, interessant usw. erachten… das liegt ganz klar am Kontext. Und am Grad der Vernetzung, des Austausches, der Solidarisierung.

.

03_Wie hat sich das im Lauf der Planung geändert? Musstet ihr irgendwas umschmeißen oder neu denken?

Als uns das Treffen von AutorInnen zu langweilig erschien und wir über Performances, Musik usw. nachdachten, wurde klar: Es wird einfach öffentlich fett eingeladen, Werbung gemacht – viel Publikum ist willkommen!!

.

04_Worauf / worüber freust du dich besonders?

Mit Menschen zu sprechen, deren Texte ich seit Jahren kenne und verehre. Diese widerum miteinander in Kontakt gehen zu sehen. Über viele einander zugewandte, aneinander interessierte, liebevolle Menschen. Über Msoke habe ich mich mächtig gefreut und Hilary McCollum [Q&A hier: Link] – sie haben ihren eigenen positiven Wind in die Veranstaltungen gebracht. Aber hey: alle sind toll!

.

05_Warum Hubert Fichte, immer noch? Ist er – nach 50 Jahren – noch immer der prominenteste progressiv queere deutschsprachige Autor? Ist das nicht… traurig/schade? [Das Festival ist nach Fichtes „Geschichte der Empfindlichkeit“ benannt und wurde mit einer Ausstellung der Fotos von Fichtes Partnerin Leonore Mau eröffnet.]

Fichte ist für mich eine Art Aufhänger – und seine Geschichte ist mit der des LCB verwoben, das bietet sich natürlich an. Außerdem hat er kluge Fragen gestellt, die uns auch immer noch bewegen, tatsächlich. Das bedeutet nicht, dass nichts passiert im Laufe der Zeit.

.

06_Ein queeres Buch, das dich beeinflusst hat?

Alma von Izabela Morska (damals hieß sie Izabela Filipiak). Es ist nicht ins Deutsche übersetzt. Aber ich bin dran 🙂

.

07_Zu viele Menschen denken bei „Homosexualität“ zuerst oder fast nur an schwule Männer. Ich wünschte, stärker in den Fokus rücken…

Transmenschen!

.o

all my 2016 interviews on Queer Literature:

…and, in German:

Kuratoren & Experten am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin: 

Queer Literature: “Empfindlichkeiten” Festival 2016:

Queer Literature, Queer Art: Quotes & Statements

.

For three days in July 2016, the „Empfindlichkeiten“ literature festival/conference at the Literarisches Colloquium Berlin invited nearly 40 international writers, scholars, artists and experts to disquss the aesthetics, challenges, politics of and differences within queer literature.

Before the conference, all guests wrote short statements – translated into English by Bradley Smith, Simon Knight, Oya Akin, Lawrence Schimel, David LeGuillermic, Pamela Selwyn, Zaia Alexander and Bill Martin.

I read these statements – a digital file of 67 pages – and compiled my favorite quotes.

It’s a personal selection, and all quotes are part of much larger contexts.

Still: to me, this is the – interesting! – tip of a – super-interesting! – iceberg:

queer literary discourse, 2016.

.

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Foto: Tobias Bohm.

.

I am certain that my writing would be completely different without my being gay. As a queer young person, you grow up with the awareness of living in a society that isn’t made for you. This influenced a particular perspective that expanded to all aspects. Things that are very important for many people don’t affect me much – but I am very touched by other things for which most people are not sensitive. – Kristof Magnusson

Just at the beginning of my career as a writer, in 1996, I was a guest at the national radio show for young writers. The editor asked me whether I planned to write a novel. He thought I couldn’t really accomplish it because my shovel wasn’t big enough. What he meant was that as »a real writer« one would need a shovel big enough to grasp all the worldly experiences, memories, histries, feelings, etc. not just the minor ones. And being a lesbian, my experiences are rather minor, particular and only autobiographical, and therefore cannot really address the big world out there.
I spent a lot of time writing and fighting against this prejudice that straight writers – being mainly »just writers« without labels – write about the world, but gay, lesbian or queer writers write only or mostly about themselves and their lives, even more, they simply write from within themselves. – Suzana Tratnik

.

Joachim Helfer, Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Foto: Tobias Bohm

Joachim Helfer, Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Foto: Tobias Bohm

.

To call a prick a prick is an act of self-assertion as a free man. – Joachim Helfer

To bashfully shroud it does nothing to make the vile pure, but may make the pure appear vile. De Sade is the ancestor of a more modern gay style of provocative divestiture. Jean Genet, Hubert Fichte and others (including myself) work from the assumption that even – or especially! – the most indecent exposure of man’s physical existence can but reveal his metaphysical truth: the untouchable dignity of each and every human being. It is this pure belief that permeates contemporary popular gay culture, from Tom of Finland and Ralf König to the anonymous participants in any Gay Pride Parade. – Joachim Helfer

‘Empfindlichkeiten’ – the motto of our conference hurts. In German, this is a charmingly provocative neologism in the association-rich plural form. Yes, we ARE sensitive. We lesbians, gay men and other kindred of the polymorphously perverse. Not just sensitive like artists are said to be, but over-sensitive in the pejorative sense. And we have every reason to be. Not just in all those countries in Eastern Europe or Africa where people like us are once again being, or have always been, marginalized, beaten, raped and murdered. The massacre in a gay bar in Orlando, Florida on 12 June 2016 is sad evidence that homophobic violence remains an everyday occurrence in liberal western countries too. In places like Germany, where it lies dormant alongside gay marriage, it can all too easily be reawakened (AfD, Pegida, Legida). – Angela Steidele

.

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin

Niviaq Korneliussen, Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Foto: Tobias Bohm

.

In Greenland there is no such thing as a literary environment and therefore no literary debates, not to mention literary debates about homosexuality. Of course books in Greenlandic are published every year, but extremely few have an influence on public debates. There are no festivals, no readings, nor reviews on the local medias. That, in general, causes no development among the few Greenlandic writers. Greenlandic books exist only as decorations – students read them in school, only because it’s mandatory. Very few buy them for private use, and when they do, they finish reading them only to hide them in a shelf to collect dust – Niviaq Korneliussen

When my book, HOMO sapienne, was published, people started to use it for debates; politicians used my phrases, scientist used my criticism of the society, homosexuals cherished probably the very first book about not heterosexual people, and readers discussed the context. Schools invited me to talk about my book and I’ve been participating in many cultural events. The reason for that, I think, is because my book is contemporary and relevant and criticizes people who aren’t used to being criticized. Although my book is being discussed a lot, people in Greenland don’t seem to talk about the fact that there are no straight people in it. I don’t consider my book as being queerliteratur, but you can’t bypass that the characters are queer. – Niviaq Korneliussen

[In Spain,] the Franco Regime continued a long tradition of homophobia on the Iberian Peninsula which once had been, at the end of the Middle Ages, long before the so-called Reconquista, a multicultural society where Arabs, Jews and Christians had coexisted quite peacefully. Among the prejudices towards the ‘Moors’ the Christian Emperors liked to highlight their supposed homosexuality, a feature they later transferred to the Native Americans after the terrible Conquista of South America. The prototypical Other was gay, and vice versa… – Dieter Ingenschay

Some critics find a decline in the production of literature with homosexual subjects after 2007, annus mirabilis which brought two important elements of social change: the above-mentioned Law of Equal Rights and the Law of Historic Memory (Ley de Memoria histórica) which was supposed to help working through the crimes of Franco’s dictatorship. These achievements, as some critics say, produced a decriminalization and hence a ‘normalization’ of the life of gays and lesbians. This is partly true, no doubt, but both laws have not yet really translated into social life. Franco’s followers still have great influence, and conservativism, machismo and the secret influence of the Catholic Church (with their disastrous organizations like the Opus Dei) still force thousands of young people to hide their (sexual) identity, especially in the rural parts of the country, – Dieter Ingenschay

.

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin

Luisgé Martin, Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Foto: Tobias Bohm

.

The paradox that all those who are oppressed sometimes feel: the belief that their oppression offers them an extraordinary tool for personal growth and creativity. In Spain, during the 1980s, it became fashionable to cynically state that „we lived better fighting against Franco“ and to insist that censorship forced the great writers to hone their intelligence and imagination. The question could now be reformulated in this way: would gay literature disappear in a hypothetical egalitarian world? Would there cease to be a specifically homosexual creativity when not just legal discrimination, but also social homophobia, disappeared? I don’t think that any reasonable human being would lament that loss, in the case of its ever occurring. – Luisge Martín

Unrequited love. It is a mathematical issue: the homosexual will always be in a minority, will always love he who cannot love him in return. – Luisge Martín

Since the French Revolution at the latest, the entire concept of so-called femininity a genuine masculine, phallological construction, with philosophers, educators, gynaecologists and couturiers responsible for its stability. I consider it more interesting how this construction has more recently been turned inside out in many contexts and also how the artificiality of traditionally highly defined masculinity has been performatively emphasized by women. – Thomas Meinecke

.

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin

Hilary McCollum, Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Foto: Tobias Bohm

.

[…] sexual and romantic relationships between women have been close to invisible. They are largely absent from both the historical record and the literary canon. This absence damages our sense of ourselves, our sexuality and our place in the world. It is as if our lives have been outside the range of human experience until the last fifty or sixty years. We need a lesbian history. But finding it is a bit like searching for buried treasure without a map. There are, however, clues; hints of the past left in diaries, letters and newspaper reports. Novelists are using these glimpses of our lesbian/queer ancestors to rescue the hidden history of relationships between women. For literary historian and novelist Emma Donoghue, writers are “digging up – or rather, creating – a history for lesbians.” – Hilary McCollum

[In Turkey,] there is a predominant attitude along the lines of “Kill me if you like, but DON’T admit that you’re gay.” It’s for this reason that lots of homosexuals get married, and to save face they even have children. […] In other words, homosexuality is still an “issue” which needs to greatly be kept secret, suppressed within the Turkish society. It is a state of faultiness/defectiveness, guilt and an absolute tool of otherization. Especially in Anatolia. I wrote “Ali and Ramazan” to come out against this entire heavily hypocritical, oppressive attitude. – Perihan Mağden

.

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin

Raziel Reid. Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Foto: Tobias Bohm

.

In Canada, where same-sex marriage was legalized in 2005, it can often seem on the surface to be a utopia of acceptance. But as the outrage and protest against my debut Young Adult novel When Everything Feels like the Movies revealed, it’s okay to be gay — as long as being gay means being like everyone else. There was a backlash against the perceived vulgarity and explicitness of the language represented in my novel — language which was often ripped directly from the mouths of the gay youth who composed my inner circle of friends and acquaintances. It appears that in achieving equality in the civilized world, gay culture is being sacrificed. Unity and equality should not have to mean homogenization. The traditions of gay culture for better and worse — the underground camp, irreverence, and brash sexuality cumulative of decades of having been ostracized by mainstream society — is no longer relevant or understood in our modern, equal times. It is therefore the responsibility of LGBT writers to document and immortalize our traditions as our culture shifts so that we don’t lose what makes us unique in order to gain acceptance. Marketing our stories to young readers is paramount to this effort. – Raziel Reid

To be an object of hate speech, to witness floods of hate speech exuded daily by politicians, newspersons, sport coaches, university professors, and clergymen resembles a bad dream. When reading Kafka at thirteen, I experienced a suffocating feeling of immense revulsion and pity. Why was this happening to Gregor? The story didn’t say. But it communicated clearly how vulnerable life becomes as soon as one is transformed into an object of disgust to others. – Izabela Morska

The gay life in Istanbul, as is the case with many others, changed dimension after the occurrences of the GeziPark protests, we can safely say that it has adopted a more organized and daring attitude. The Gay Pride which took place in the summer of 2013, during the GeziPark, was tremendously effusive, and was supported and claimed not only by the gay community, but the heterosexual community also. This great power most probably disturbed the present Turkish administration, for the Gay Pride which took place the following year was met with police raids, and the groups were attacked with gas bombs and the parade suffered a drastic blow. – Ahmet Sami Özbudak

For in an Islamic country, living a free and open homosexual life is unacceptable. If the prevalent Islamic atmosphere increases its intensity and Turkey becomes an even more fanatic Islamic country, the fight for existence for the gay community will become even more difficult. – Ahmet Sami Özbudak

.

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin

Sookee. Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Tobias Bohm.

.

I am so glad to see that there are several young queer rappers and djs who can rely on and collaborate with a scene and multiple protagonists who are much like them. These people like me refuse to use discriminatory, hateful language. They empower themselves by combining the personal with the political and build a language that makes them unique as rappers and outspoken as queer fighters, lovers and dreamers. The rap mainstream has slowly come to the point that we can’t be ignored anymore. There is still separation, but no more negation. – Sookee

I have come to the straightforward conclusion that the homosexuality of the author is not necessarily reflected in the content of his or her work, but rather in the way in which he or she looks out on the world. I am thinking, for example, of writers such as Henry James, E.M. Forster or William Somerset Maugham: in their novels and short stories, you hardly ever come across homosexual content, but it is impossible not to sense their homosexual identity. – Mario Fortunato

The notion of a ‘gay literature’ is a product of precisely these discourses of power. It was invented to cement the idea that real literature is straight. In this scenario, gay literature is a niche product that only those directly affected need to bother about. – Robert Gillett

.

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin

Angela Steidele. Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Foto: Tobias Bohm

.

For some 200 years, a particular variant of violence against lesbians was the assertion that we didn’t exist. Until the mid-eighteenth century, sex between women carried a death penalty just as it did between men. It was in the Enlightenment, oddly enough, that male philosophers, jurists and theorists of femininity became persuaded that sex between women could be nothing more than preposterous ‘indecent trifling’. Trapped in their phallocentric worldview, they abolished the penalties for lesbian sex beginning around 1800, because in their opinion there was no such thing (the English and French penal codes had never even mentioned it in the first place). Women-loving women disappeared into non-existence, reappearing in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century novels as ghosts and vampires at best, in any case as imaginary beings. […] My work is dedicated to giving the women-loving women of (early) modern Europe back their voices and making their stories known. – Angela Steidele

We have lived through times in which heterosexuals went to great lengths, partially with violence, to separate themselves from homosexuals. As a result, homosexuals began to separate themselves from heterosexuals, a liberation movement that aspired to a life as a supplement to the majority. – Gunther Geltinger

Writing in a homosexual way means not only acknowledging my origin, education, and traditions, but also permanently questioning them. – Gunther Geltinger

.

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin

Saleem Haddad. Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Foto: Tobias Bohm

.

From the word ‘liwat/looti’ (used to refer to male homosexuals and which suggests the act of sodomy), to the female ‘sihaqah’ (which can be roughly translated to ‘grinder’), as well as the word ‘khanith/mukhannath’ (popular in the Gulf and drawing on memories of eunuchs), and finally the word ‘shaath’ (which means queer or deviant), there is no shortage of words to describe homosexual acts in Arabic, though none are positive. – Saleem Haddad

In fact, for many queer Arabs, frank discussions of sex often happen in English or French. Perhaps those languages offer a more comfortable distance, a protective barrier between an individual and their sexual practices. Arabic: serious, complex, and closely associated with the Quran, can sometimes appear too heavy, too loaded with social and cultural baggage. Perhaps this reason may explain why many Arab writers choose to write about their homosexuality in English or French, myself included. English provides us with a safe distance: from our communities, and perhaps in some way from ourselves. – Saleem Haddad

Over the last twenty years of LGBTQ activism in the Arab world, some activists have made a concerted, and somewhat successful, effort to re-appropriate and re-shape the language around queer identities. The word ‘mithli’, for example, which is derived from the translation of the phrase ‘homo’, and which reframes the language from a focus on same-sex practices towards describing same-sex identities, is now seen as a more respectful way to refer to gay and lesbian individuals. However, while the word mithli has caught on in media and intellectual circles, the word for ‘hetero’, ghayiriyi, remains unused—thereby rendering the heterosexual identity invisible, signifying it’s ordinariness, while in turn differentiating the ‘homosexual’ with their own unique word: mithli. Perhaps in recognition of this, some movements, in turn, have sought to move beyond the hetero/homo binaries altogether, by Arab-izing the word ‘queer’ into ‘kweerieh’. – Saleem Haddad

Reclaiming words and finding spaces for our identities in them allows us to take ownership over language. After all, what purpose does language serve if we are unable to modernise it, to mould it, shape it, and, ultimately, find a space for ourselves in its words? – Saleem Haddad

.

Foto: Mandy Seidler, LCB

Foto: Mandy Seidler, LCB

.o

all my 2016 interviews on Queer Literature:

…and, in German:

Kuratoren & Experten am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin: 

Queer Literature: “Empfindlichkeiten” Festival 2016:

Queeres Literaturfestival „Empfindlichkeiten“: das Publikum

 

IMG_1777

Einlass-Stempel beim „Empfindlichkeiten“-Festival

 

.

ohne, nachgezählt zu haben… rein nach Gefühl…

merke ich, im Literaturbetrieb:

.

  • In Verlagen arbeiten UNGLAUBLICH viele junge Frauen.
  • In Presseabteilungen arbeiten fast NUR (unglaublich nette!) Frauen.
  • Verleger sind fast immer männlich.
  • Im Netz (besonder Twitter & Tumblr) sprechen queere Nordamerikaner*innen über ALLES.
  • Deutlich weniger queere Deutsche machen sich online sichtbar/angreifbar/verletzlich.
  • Deutsche lesbische Bekannte äußern sich online super-selten und sind oft super-zurückhaltend…
  • …und damit leider: super-unsichtbar.
  • Populäre Belletristik wird (fast nur) für Frauen vermarktet, gestaltet.
  • Meine belesensten Netz- und Blog-Freunde sind (fast nur) Frauen.
  • Die Menschen aber, die am lautesten kommentieren, auf ihrem Expertenstatus beharren, auf Facebook laut zetern, sich mit Verrissen profilieren… sind meist (eine Handvoll immergleiche) lesende Männer.
  • Je kleiner die Stadt, desto mehr Enthusiasmus für/Interesse an Lesungen.
  • Aber: Je kleiner die Stadt, desto grauer/älter das Publikum.

.

Vieles ist nur ein vages Gefühl:

Ich mag, wenn Menschen nachzählen – und dabei Vorurteile bestätigen oder umwerfen, z.B. über (anspruchsvolle? anspruchslose?) Buchblogs oder Frauen auf Experten-Panels oder das Geschlechterverhältnis im Feuilleton oder LGBTQI-Figuren im Fernsehen.

Mein flüchtiger Eindruck, nach einigen Besuchen am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin: Dafür, dass das LCB *sehr* schick, bürgerlich, herrschaftlich am Wannsee thront, ist das Publikum (immer) recht jung, gemischt, urban. Aber: Dafür, dass „Empfindlichkeiten“ ein explizit queeres Festival ist, sind die Besucher*innen… eigentlich die selben, die ich z.B. auch beim LCB-Sommerfest der kleinen Verlage sehe.

Oder?

Mandy Seiler vom LCB macht „Empfindlichkeiten“-Fotos – und gibt mir Kopien, für den Blog.

Ich sehe DIESES „Empfindlichkeiten“-Foto:

IMG_1679

.

…und merke auf den ersten Blick:

Etwas stimmt nicht. SO sah das Publikum aus? Wirklich?

Erst, als ich weiterscrolle, wird klar: Das Foto stammt vom Vortag – und einer Lesung von Judith Hermann. Das Publikum bei „Empfindlichkeiten“ sieht anders aus. Nicht SO anders, dass ich sofort denke „Wow: Alle hier sind garantiert queer!“ Aber eben doch: männlicher, punkiger, less gender-conforming.

Mich freut, dass das auffällt.

Doch mich freut auch, dass es mir zuerst eben nicht auffällt.

Ich sehe das „Empfindlichkeiten“-Publikum – und denke: ein schöner Querschnitt.

Nicht: Nische. Abseits. Schutzraum. Exoten. Minderheit. Sondern: Menschen, wie ich sie auf jeder Sorte Lesung sehen will. Oder in der Schlange im Supermarkt. #diversity #zwanglos

.

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Foto: Tobias Bohm.

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Foto: Tobias Bohm.

Queer Literature, 2016: Luisgé Martin

Luisge Martin. Foto: lizenzfrei, von hier

Luisge Martin. Foto: lizenzfrei

.

Luisgé Martin is a Spanish novelist and essayist, born in Madrid, 1962 – and he’s both speaking and reading at the 2016 “Empfindlichkeiten” Literature Festival in Berlin.

Wikipedia (Spanish)  |  Goodreads  |  portrait/profile (Enquirer.net)

„He received a degree in Hispanic Studies from the Universidad Complutense in Madrid and a Master in Business Management from Instituto de Empresa. His first novel “La muerte de Tadzio” (“The Death of Tadzio,” Alfaguara, 2000) was awarded the Premio Ramón Gómez de la Serna. […] He occasionally works as a columnist in various periodicals such as El Viajero, Babelia, El País and Shangay Express.“ [source: Link]

.

01_Is there a text that introduces you / gives a good introduction to the topics and issues that you care about?

Alexis ou le traité du vain combat“ by Marguerite Yourcenar

.

02_If someone call you „homosexual author“, you…

I say yes, but not only that.

.

03_A queer book that influenced you (how?)…

Luis Cernuda’s poetry. It helped me to make from pain.

.

04_A different piece of queer culture that influenced you…

Many films: L’homme blessé by Patrice Chéreau, Torch Song Trilogy by Paul Bogart, etc.

.

05_Something about homosexuality that you wish you had learned/understood/known earlier……

Everything. When I was fifteen I didn’t know anything about homosexuality.

.

06_If your work is placed in book stores, THESE are the authors you’d feel most honored to be placed next to:

Marguerite Yourcenar, Thomas Mann, Oscar Wilde, Manuel Puig…

.

07_A queer moment you’ve had in Berlin (or anywhere in Germany) that you’ll remember for a long time:

The kitsch decoration in the first gay bar I got in in Berlin.

.

08_Is there a heterosexual ally that you like/value and who you’ve grateful for?

Former Spain’s Prime Minister, José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, who approved gay marriage in Spain.

.

09_Is there another guest/author at „Empfindlichkeiten“ you’re particularly looking forward to? (why?)

Abdelah Taia and Edouard Louis because of their books.

.

10_Is there a queer phenomenom that is very visible in the mainstream culture – and that makes you happy BECAUSE it is so visible?

Gay Pride in Madrid.

.

11_Is there a particular prejudice, misconception or line of thought about queerness that you wish would just go away/not be discussed again and again?

The importance or self-censorship of effeminacy.

.

12_Is Hubert Fichte important to you? How?

No. I haven’t read him yet.

13_What’s your history with the Literarisches Colloquium Berlin? Have you been here?

I haven’t heard about it before being invited to participate in this festival.

.

14_Is there a queer literary event that you miss/envision/would like to see?

I can’t think of any. But I would like that there were many more queer literary events all over the world.

.

15_Queer texts are often about sexuality, identity/coming to terms with yourself and/or discrimination. Are there other topics/issues that you’d like to see featured in queer books more often?

Family relationships in a specific way.

.

16_What country, what culture energizes you, teaches you new things about queerness?

USA due to the amount of contradictions that exist in the queer fight and recognition.

.

17_In mainstream culture, queerness increasingly gets some space. But then: does qeer culture embrace mainstream, too? Does it embrace mainstream TOO MUCH – when it comes to questions of gender norms, family planning, „presentable“ people, consumerism, politics? Where do queerness and „normality“ crash? Do they crash/collide hard enough?

Marginal cultures always fight for recognition and recognition comes when they conquer spaces. We cannot regret and feel ashamed of such conquests.

.

18_If universities/academics talk about queer topics, you often think…

Temporarily, that is great news.

.

19_A person (or, more general: an aspect of personality or appearance) that you find very sexy:

Youth.

.

20_There’s a video campaign that wants to prevent depressed queer teenagers from commiting suicide, „It gets better“. DOES it get better? How and for whom? When did it get better for you? What has to get better still?

Yes, it gets better, much better. The Empfindlichkeiten festival is an example because it has assembled a bunch of writers who have told their tragic stories in their books, but their lives now are better and they can talk and write about those past hard days with perspective.

.

all my 2016 interviews on Queer Literature:

…and, in German:

Kuratoren & Experten am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin: 

Queer Literature: „Empfindlichkeiten“ Festival 2016:

Queer Literature, 2016: Saleem Haddad

Saleem Haddad

Saleem Haddad

.

Saleem Haddad is a novelist who’s both speaking and reading at the 2016 “Empfindlichkeiten” Literature Festival in Berlin. He was born in Kuwait City in 1983 and is currently living in London. He has a Lebanese-Palestinian father and an Iraqi-German mother.

Saleem’s debut novel „Guapa“  |  Saleem’s web site  |  Wikipedia  |  Twitter

.

01_The most memorable moment of queerness you’ve encountered in your childhood:

Dressing up as a girl when I was six or seven and telling my brother he had to call me Maya.

.

02_A queer book that influenced you (how?):

My book has been heavily influenced by queer writers: Colm Toibin, and the way he writes about mothers and their sons, Abdellah Taia’s writings on homosexuality and Morocco, James Baldwin’s „Giovanni’s Room“, the way Christopher Isherwood wrote about Berlin in „Goodbye to Berlin“, the way Andre Aciman wrote so beautifully about desire in „Call Me By Your Name“, and the way Gore Vidal writes about gay alienation in early twentieth century America. So much of my novel owes itself to these works, so I’ve tried to echo and pay homage to these writers in my text.

.

03_A different piece of queer culture (no book: something else) that influenced you:

The glam rock musical Hedwig and the Angry Inch, I first saw the film adaptation in college, and have seems nearly fifty times since. To me it defines the queer experience, and the power of love and self-acceptance. When I first sold my novel to my publishers in New York, my partner and I went to see Hedwig on Broadway. I felt I had finally come full circle in a way. It was one of the most beautiful moments in my life. I was also heavily influenced by Mashrou‘ Leila, a Lebanese rock band that is unabashedly queer and political. Their music was the perfect soundtrack to my writing.

.

04_A queer moment you’ve had in Berlin (or anywhere in Germany) that you’ll remember for a long time:

The first pride parade I ever attended was in Berlin in 2006. I was so terrified to be there, and yet so excited at the same time. The weather was so hot, everyone was shirtless, and it was both incredibly sexy and also empowering. So thank you Berlin!

.

05_Is there a heterosexual ally that you like/value and who you’ve grateful for?

My brother is probably my biggest ally and supporter. He was one of the first people I came out to, and also helped me come out to the rest of my family. From the beginning he stood by me and supported me unconditionally.

.

06_Is there another guest/author at „Empfindlichkeiten“ you’re particularly looking forward to?

I can’t get enough of Abdellah Taia, his writing is so raw, poetic and honest.

.

07_Name a queer guilty pleasure you feel passionate about:

RuPaul’s Drag Race. It makes me want to put on a dress throw shade everywhere, and celebrate my queerness.

.

08_What country/nation, what city, what region, what culture energizes you/teaches you new things about queerness/is big on your „queer map“?

I am inspired by the Middle East– my home. I love the sense of community, and I love how the queer movements there remain fiercely political, linking their struggles with broader struggles for justice and freedom.

.

09_More and more often, people use intersectionality to discuss identity (and: discrimination). How is intersectionality important/relevant to your art/work?

Intersectionality is very important for me: living in Europe I sometimes feel just as queer for my Arabness as I do for my homosexuality. Exploring these different types of queerness is central to my work. I also think class does not get talked about enough, and as someone who read Gramsci and Marx in college, class is something that always comes through in my writings. I do wish the mainstream LGBT movements in the West increasingly linked their struggles to broader struggles around racism, class and Islamophobia.

.

10_In mainstream culture, queerness increasingly gets some niches/some space. But then: does queer culture embrace mainstream, too? Does it embrace mainstream TOO MUCH – when it comes to questions of gender norms, family planning, „presentable“ people, consumerism, politics? Where do queerness and „normality“ crash? Do they crash/collide hard enough?

I believe that queerness by its very nature of being queer just stands outside of the mainstream. To paraphrase Foucault: to be critical of things is not to say everything is bad, but rather to say that everything is dangerous. By standing apart from the mainstream, queerness will always be a critical voice that tells us we always have something to do.

[Foucault, in 1983, said: ‚My point is not that everything is bad, but that everything is dangerous, which is not exactly the same as bad. If everything is dangerous, then we always have something to do. So my position leads not to apathy but to hyper- and pessimistic – activism.‘]

.

all my 2016 interviews on Queer Literature:

…and, in German:

Kuratoren & Experten am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin: 

Queer Literature: „Empfindlichkeiten“ Festival 2016:

Queere Kunst 2016: Martina Minette Dreier

Martina Minette Dreier Ende 2015 in ihrem Atelier - mit den Arbeiten des vergangenen Jahres.

Martina Minette Dreier Ende 2015 in ihrem Atelier – mit den Arbeiten des vergangenen Jahres.

.

Queere Literatur – aus Europa und der Welt: Vom 14. bis 16. Juli 2016 veranstaltet das Literarische Colloquium Berlin (LCB, am Wannsee) ein Festival zu Homosexualitäten – “Empfindlichkeiten” (mehr Infos in der Spex und auf der LCB-Website).

Ich begleite das Festival als Liveblogger… und stelle bis Sonntag mehreren Künstler*innen, Autor*innen und interessierten Besuchern kurze Fragen über Queerness, Widerstand und das Potenzial homosexueller Literatur.

Den Anfang machten Katy Derbyshire (Link)Kristof Magnusson (Link)Angela Steidele (Link) und Hans Hütt (Link). Jetzt…

.

Künstlerin Martina Minette Dreier:

Minette zeichnet und malt – oft in Öl, und oft nicht-binäre oder nicht-cissexuelle Personen sowie Drag Queens, Drag Kings, queere Performer. Fürs Festival „Empfindlichkeiten“ skizziert/zeichnet sie Besucher*innen, Autor*innen und Besucherinnen rund ums Festival.

Minettes Portfolio  |  Minettes „Play Gender“-Portraits  |  „My Ancestors“: Frauen, die Minette prägten

01_Eine eigene Arbeit oder Link, der dich vorstellt:

www.playgender.wordpress.com

.

02_Wenn mich jemand „homosexuelle(r) Künstler*in“ nennt…

http://twitter.com/lauracwinter/status/751070363862310916/photo/1

.

03_Das Queerste, das ich in meiner Kindheit sah oder kannte, war…

Eine Figur aus einem „Mädchenbuch“, „Pucki“ von Magda Trott: https://basedinberlin.wordpress.com/2013/04/22/621/

.

04_Ein anderes Stück queerer Kultur [andere Kunstformen], das mich beeinflusst hat (und wie?)…

http://www.kingzofberlin.de/index03.html

.

05_Ein queerer Moment in Berlin (oder in Deutschland), an den ich mich lange erinnern werde:

https://www.dhm.de/ausstellungen/archiv/2015/homosexualitaet-en.html

.

heute morgen, während dem Diskussionspanel „Maske“, machte Minette eine Skizze von Ronny Matthes (Pressearbeit für „Empfindlichkeiten“, Interview hier) und mir:

13692707_10210325038545194_3576983072888946535_n

.o

all my 2016 interviews on Queer Literature:

…and, in German:

Kuratoren & Experten am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin: 

Queer Literature: “Empfindlichkeiten” Festival 2016:

Queere Literatur 2016: „Maske“, „Körper“, „Schrift“ – drei Diskussionspanels auf dem Literaturfestival „Empfindlichkeiten“ (LCB Berlin)

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Foto: Tobias Bohm

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin

.

Queere Literatur – aus Europa und der Welt: Vom 14. bis 16. Juli 2016 veranstaltet das Literarische Colloquium Berlin (LCB, am Wannsee) ein Festival zu Homosexualitäten – “Empfindlichkeiten” (mehr Infos in der Spex und auf der LCB-Website).

Ich begleite das Festival als Liveblogger.

Der Freitag Vor- und Nachmittag gehört drei großen, knapp zweistündigen Diskussions-Panels: „Maske“, „Körper“ und „Schrift“. Fotos vom Festival-Fotografen Tobias Bohm:

.

.

11.00 Uhr: Maske. Statements und Diskussion – mit: 

Ahmet Sami Özbudak (Istanbul)
Angela Steidele (Köln)
Hilary McCollum (Donegal)
Thomas Meinecke (Eurasburg)
Robert Gillett
(London)

Moderation: Franziska Bergmann

.

Statements aus der Diskussion, die mir im Gedächtnis blieben – schnell mitgetippt:

.

We need to watch language closely and ask ourselves: Whose power is actually operating in that sentence? – Robert Gillett

I know that I’m not a man – I’m DOING a man. That’s what I learned from feminist theory. – Thomas Meinecke

A woman dressing up as a man is confirming the system – by undermining it. – Angela Steidele

I think that queer theory has more… air than, at this minute, it needs: A lot of queer discourse is completely alienating to the vast majority of people. Queer theory is elitist and exclusionary. – Hillary McColum

I disagree. I know that reading queer theory exhausting. But I think that right now, academic writing has so much turned into being like narrative writing – almost like belletristik, literature, pieces of art… I’ve learned a lot about writing from academic writing – often written by women deconstructing feminism: I don’t make the distinction anymore between theory and fiction. – Thomas Meinecke

Angela Steidele benutzt in Vorträgen oft das generische Femininum: „Ich sage „die Biografin“, „die Autorin“… and I know that I shock my audience with that.

.

Angela Steidele und Moderatorin Franziska Bergmann im Diskussionspanel "Maske"

Angela Steidele und Moderatorin Franziska Bergmann im Diskussionspanel „Maske“


.

Tobias Bohms Fotos vom zweiten Panel:

 

12.30 Uhr: Körper. Statements und Diskussion – mit:

Perihan Magden (Istanbul)
Roland Spahr (Frankfurt)
Antje Rávic Strubel (Berlin)
Michał Witkowski (Warszawa)

Moderation: Dirk Naguschewski

.

Statements aus der Diskussion, die mir im Gedächtnis blieben – schnell mitgetippt:

.

Accepting ambiguities is very important in the work of Hubert Fichte and in queer literature as a whole. That’s what Fichte talked about in „die Verschwulung der Welt“: It doesn’t mean that everybody has to be gay – but that everybody should learn to perceive the world in different ways. – Roland Spahr

If you’re known as a gay writer, the publishing house wants you to write about homosexuality in every new book – and you have to prove [your authenticity] with your body and your biography, again and again. But what am I? What shelf, what section should I be placed in? „East German author“? „Woman writer“? „Gay writer“? That alone should give me the right to be… everywhere: On ALL the bookshelves! – Antje Rávic Strubel

If I’m doing a reading – especially in England or France – all writers are asked about literature. I’m asked – especially about four years ago: ‚How do you feel about Turkey joining the European Union‘? They others are writes. I’m seen as a diplomat. When it comes to Turkish writers, it’s always about politics. – Perihan Magden

Once your books leave the country, you’re not only [seen as] a man and a homosexual – but a Polish person, too. So you have one more problem. British publishers always want you to write about Auschwitz or about the pope. You have to first overcome that your literature is always seen in the context of Poland: „Oh – look at this literature… coming out of such a backwards country full of problems!“ – Michał Witkowski

.

Autorin Antje Rávic Strubel - Foto von Tobias Bohm

Autorinnen Perihan Magden und Antje Rávic Strubel, dahinter Thorsten Dönges – Foto von Tobias Bohm


.

Tobias Bohms Fotos vom dritten Panel:

.

15.30 Uhr: Schrift. Statements und Diskussion – mit:

Gunther Geltinger (Köln)
Ben Fergusson (Oxford / Berlin)
Joachim Helfer (Berlin)
Sookee (Berlin)
Saleem Haddad (London)
Jayrôme C. Robinet (Berlin)

Moderation: Nina Seiler

.

Statements aus der Diskussion, die mir im Gedächtnis blieben – schnell mitgetippt:

.

Please go count queer published writers: We have not yet travelled even half the way to full recognition. We’re – all of us here […at the festival] – are the exceptions. Not the rule. – Joachim Helfer

We all have multiple identities, but I think that sometimes, the identity that is the most threatened is going to be in the forefront. – Jayrôme C. Robinet

The concept of „queerness“ touches on issues of class, politics that I identify with beyond my sexuality: „Queer“ is a term that’s quite broad and subversive. – Saleem Haddad

I know what gay sex is. I know what gay love is. I can imagine all kinds of desires. But I have no idea what a „gay identity“ is. – Joachim Helfer

I wish I wouldn’t have an identity. I wish that I could just… evaporate into straight white maleness. – Saleem Haddad

I love hiphop culture, but it can be very homophic. A lot of artists say „No homo“ all the time. So I turned „no homo“ into „pro homo“… and sometimes, during my concerts, guys in the front row go all „pro homo! pro homo!“ before they realize what they are saying. – Sookee

…und ein Gedanke von Joachim Helfer: Zu fragen, ob spezifisch „queere“ Arten gäbe, sich zu äußern oder Kunst zu machen, kann man erst, „wenn 100 Jahre lang jeder leben kann, wie er will – weil so viel [queere Kunst] gerade aus Oppression heraus geschieht“.

.

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Foto: Thomas Bohm

Empfindlichkeiten-Festival, LCB, 15.07.2016, Berlin. Foto: Tobias Bohm

.o

all my 2016 interviews on Queer Literature:

…and, in German:

Kuratoren & Experten am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin: 

Queer Literature: “Empfindlichkeiten” Festival 2016:

Queere Literatur 2016: Hans Hütt

Journalist und Autor Hans Hütt, 2016

Journalist und Autor Hans Hütt, 2016

.

Queere Literatur – aus Europa und der Welt: Vom 14. bis 16. Juli 2016 veranstaltet das Literarische Colloquium Berlin (LCB, am Wannsee) ein Festival zu Homosexualitäten – “Empfindlichkeiten” (mehr Infos in der Spex und auf der LCB-Website).

Ich werde das Festival als Liveblogger begleiten… und stelle bis Sonntag mehreren Künstler*innen, Autor*innen und interessierten Besuchern kurze Fragen über Queerness, Widerstand und das Potenzial homosexueller Literatur.

Den Anfang machten Katy Derbyshire (Link)Kristof Magnusson (Link) und Angela Steidele (Link). Jetzt…

.

Autor Hans Hütt (mehr hier).

Aufgewachsen am Niederrhein. Studium der Politikwissenschaft, Musikwissenschaft, Psychologie, Empirischen Kulturwissenschaft, Vergleichenden Literaturwissenschaften und Religionswissenschaft in Tübingen und Berlin. Von 1974 bis 1990 war Hans Hütt Ausstellungsmacher, Autor, Dramaturg, Kulturmanager, Lektor, Literaturkritiker, Moderator, Redakteur, Reporter, Übersetzer und Verleger – für Berliner Festwochen, Deutsche Welle, Deutscher Bücherbund, Deutscher Koordinierungsrat, Literaturzeitschrift Listen, Radio 100 in Berlin, Stadt Frankfurt am Main, Südwestfunk, AStA der Universität Tübingen, Art Journal Wolkenkratzer, Verlag rosa Winkel und ZDF. Aktuell schreibt Hütt oft für die FAZ (Link: Publikationen).

Hans Hütt auf Twitter  |  Hans Hütts Blog

.

01_Eine eigene Arbeit, die mich vorstellt:

Für den Essay „Angst vor der Gleichheit“ erhielt ich im Oktober 2014 den Michael-Althen-Preis für Kritik. Inzwischen ist er in einer erweiterten Fassung mit Anmerkungen im Jahrbuch Sexualitäten 2016 im Wallstein Verlag erschienen. Hier der link zum Blogeintrag vom Juli 2014: http://www.anlasslos.de/?p=521

.

02_Wenn mich jemand „homosexuelle(r) Autor*in“ nennt…

…dann hat derjenige, der mich so nennt, entweder keine Achtung vor mir als Autor oder vor der Tatsache, dass ich schwul bin. Die Ergänzung um das Adjektiv erzeugt ein Abseits, das mir keinen Platz bietet, sondern einen zuweist.

.

03_Das Queerste, das ich in meiner Kindheit sah oder kannte…

In meiner Kindheit gab es weder den Begriff „queer“ noch seinen Superlativ. Aber ich hatte einen Mitschüler, der meinen Griechischlehrer gerne mit einer Karikatur auf der Tafel zeigte, wie er mit seinem unglaublich breit links und rechts nach unten gezogenen Mund eine Banane quer zu sich nahm.

.

04_Ein queeres Buch, das mich beeinflusst hat…

„Die Laute“ von Michael Roes, den ich bei diesem Festival vermisse. Ich habe über „Die Laute“ eine Rezension für die taz geschrieben.

.

05_Ein anderes Stück queerer Kultur, das mich beeinflusst hat:

Der Film „A un dios desconocido“ (An einen unbekannten Gott) von Jaime Chávarri, den ich 1978 bei der Berlinale sah. Er erzählt in Rückblenden die Ermordung Lorcas. Ein alt gewordener Zauberer erinnert sich an seine Kindheit. Die Erinnerung setzt eine Tonbandaufnahme in Gang. Auf dem Band hat er Locas „Ode an Walt Whitman“ eingesprochen. Sie bahnt der Erinnerung den Weg.

.

06_Ich wünschte, ich hätte in Sachen Homosexualität früher gelernt/gewusst/erfahren, dass…

„In Sachen Homosexualität“ kann ich keine Auskunft geben. Das Wissen ist unteilbar da oder nicht. Verzögerung oder verfrühtes Wissen ändert daran kaum etwas. Allerdings gibt es eine inhärente Neugier, gespeist aus der Erfahrung, anders zu sein, diejenigen zu beobachten, denen diese Erfahrung fremd ist.

.

07_Mich ehrt, wenn meine Arbeiten in einer Buchhandlung oder Ausstellung neben folgenen Autor*innen stehen:

Karsten Witte, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Pierre Guyotat, Didier Eribon, Michel Foucault.

.

08_Zu viele Menschen denken bei „Homosexualität“ zuerst oder fast nur an schwule Männer. Ich wünschte, stärker in den Fokus rücken…

Warum sollen sie nicht an schwule Männer denken (wenn sie denn denken)? Warum sollte ich, und sei es nur durch wishful thinking, erziehungsdiktatorisch wirken wollen? Das Gedächtnis und der Assoziationsraum sind sehr individuell geprägt. Kulturelle Codierungen können daran nur wenig ändern.

.

09_Ein queerer Moment in Berlin (oder in Deutschland), an den ich mich lange erinnern werde:

ein Schnappschuss, der mir im letzten Jahr am Rand einer Ausstellungseröffnung gelang. Ich nenne ihn „Pflanze Mensch“.

.

pflanze mensch

.

10_Folgende Expert*innen, Autor*innen, Aktivisit*innen, Orte, Institutionen, Diskurse haben mein (Selbst-)Verständnis beeinflusst oder geprägt:

Roland Barthes, die Essaysammlungen „Drei Milliarden Perverse“ und „Elemente einer homosexuellen Kritik“, die ich 1979 und 1980 als Lektor im Verlag rosa Winkel herausbrachte. Der Buchladen Prinz Eisenherz. Das Bali-Kino Manfred Salzgebers. Die frühen Panorama-Programme, die er für die Berlinale kuratierte. Die NGbK. In Erinnerung: Frank Wagner. Heute Johannes Kram. Neuerdings mein Mitbewohner Lavender Wolf.

.

11_Folgende Expert*innen, Autor*innen, Aktivisit*innen, Orte, Institutionen, Themen verdienen mehr Aufmerksamkeit/Zuwendung:

Michael Roes, Pierre Guyotat, einige Bände der Zeitschrift „Semiotext(e), die Sylvère Lotringer gegründet hat, zB die Ausgabe „Polysexuality“. Die Anthologie „Now The Volcano“, eine Sammlung lateinamerikanischer schwuler Literatur, die Winston Leyland 1979 bei Gay Sunshine Press herausbrachte.

.

12_Ein heterosexueller Ally/Verbündeter, dem ich dankbar bin und/oder den ich schätze:

Ich maß mir nicht an, irgendwelche Aussagen über die sexuelle Prägung von Autoren zu treffen, die ich gerne lese, weil sie klug sind. Zum Beispiel Nils Minkmar.

.

13_Ein Gast beim „Empfindlichkeiten“-Festival, auf den ich mich besonders freue:

Abdellah Taïa, dessen Werk und Engagement ich bewundere und der mit seiner Eröffnungsrede zu „Empfindlichkeiten“ eine schwule Idee der Transsubstantion entwickelt hat.

.

14_Eine politische oder öffentliche Figur, über die wir dringend mehr reden müssen. Und eine, über die wir weniger reden sollten:

Bei Figuren denke ich an Choreographien, also Bewegungsabläufe von Menschen. Figuren sind eine Zuschreibung mit leicht abschätzigem Unterton. Das Redenmüssen erscheint mir diskursiv im übrigen eher als eine zweifelhafte Figur. Mein Denken verdanke ich auch dem Umstand, dass ich öffentlichen Redegeboten immer zuwider gehandelt habe.

.

15_Eine queere Figur, ein queerer Star oder eine queere Geschichte aus dem Mainstream, über deren Popularität/Strahlkraft ich mich freue:

Hildegard Knefs Schwester Irmgard.

.

16_Ich wünschte, folgendes reaktionäre Vorurteil/Denkfigur würde endlich verschwinden/nicht immer wieder neu diskutiert werden:

Ernsthaft: es wird uns nicht gelingen, Emanzipation mit Verboten oder Ausschlüssen zu ermöglichen.

.

17_Hubert Fichte bedeutet mir…

…seit der frühen Lektüre seines Buchs „Versuch über die Pubertät“ sehr viel.

.

18_Leonore Mau bedeutet mir…

…infolge ihrer Fotobände über Brasilien sehr viel.

.

19_Am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin…

…war ich, seit ich zum ersten Mal nach Berlin gezogen bin, sehr oft. Besonders gut in Erinnerung: das helle Lachen Walter Höllerers, der Sommer, in dem die Bennents hier wohnten (während der Dreharbeiten zu Schlöndorffs Blechtrommel-Verfilmung.

.

20_Ein queeres literarisches Event, das ich mir wünsche:

eine lange Nacht der ermordeten schwulen Autoren: Lorca, Pasolini, Sénac uvm.

.

21_Ein queeres guilty pleasure in meinem Leben:

I prefer pleasure without any sense of guilt.

.

22_Ein Staat, eine Stadt, Region, Kultur oder eine Szene, aus der ich wichtige queere Impulse erhalte:

Ach, dann sage ich jetzt einfach mal Sousse und behalte das Geheimnis warum, für mich.

.

23_Identität (und: Diskriminierung) wird immer öfter intersektionell beschrieben und diskutiert. Als queere*r Künstler*in interessiert mich aus dieser Perspektive besonders…

Mein Denken beginnt jenseits der Diskriminierung. Sich an ihr als gesellschaftlicher Tatsache festzuhalten, verlängert ihr Überleben. Identität ist, wie mein Lehrer Fritz Morgenthaler 1979/80 schrieb eher ein zweifelhafter Begriff, wenn es um die psychische Konstitution von Schwulen geht. Wichtiger wäre eine anschauliche Idee und Praxis von Autonomie.

.

24_Der Mainstream räumt Queerness oft mittlerweile etwas mehr Platz ein. Räumt Queerness auch dem Mainstream mehr (zu viel?) Platz ein – in Fragen wie Familien- und Rollenbildern, Selbstdarstellung, Konsum und Politik? Wo reiben sich Queerness und „Normalität“? Reiben sie sich genug?

Ich kann mit dem Begriff Mainstream wenig anfangen. Wo fängt er an, wo auf?

.

25_Wenn Universitäten und Akademiker auf queere Diskurse (und: Gender-Diskurse) blicken, denke ich…

…völlig entsetzt darüber, dass neuerdings, wenn es nach dem Willen studentischer Aktivisten ginge, Ovids Metamorphosen an der Columbia University nur noch mit Warnhinweisen gelesen werden dürfen. Es gibt infolge einer Institutionalisierung gewisser Teilschulen der gender-Diskurse Denkverbote und ästhetische Grenzziehungen, die ich intellektuell zweifelhaft finde.

.

26_Ein Mensch (oder, abstrakter: eine Eigenschaft/ein Wesenszug), den ich sehr sexy finde:

Kitzligkeit an unerwarteten Stellen.

.

27_Kulturvermittler*innen, Institutionen, Journalist*innen machen, nach meiner Erfahrung, im Umgang mit queerer Kultur manchmal folgenden Fehler:

none of my business mich hier als Schulmeisterlein zu betätigen.

.

28_Wie/wo/wann profitierte ich künstlerisch von meiner eigenen Queerness? Und steht/stand sie mir je im Weg, war sie je eine Schwierigkeit für mich?

Sie stand mir (fast) nie im Weg, aber öffnete meinem Denken und Reden immer wieder neue überraschende Wendungen.

.

29_Eine Video-Kampagne, die queere Jugendliche vom Selbstmord abhalten will, verspricht: „It gets better.“ DOES it get better? Wo und für wen? Wann/wie wurde es für dich besser? Was muss noch anders/besser werden?

Die Geschichte kennt den Fortschritt immer nur als linearen Prozess. Wichtiger wäre es, wenn die gute Idee von Dan Savage um das Bewusstsein erweitert würde, dass es auch Rückschläge gibt und damit die individuelle und kollektive Gabe fördert, dem zu widerstehen.

.o

all my 2016 interviews on Queer Literature:

…and, in German:

Kuratoren & Experten am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin: 

Queer Literature: “Empfindlichkeiten” Festival 2016:

.

Queere Literatur 2016: Kristof Magnusson

Kristof Magnusson, Foto von Gunnar Klack

Autor Kristof Magnusson. Foto: Gunnar Klack

.

Queere Literatur – aus Europa und der Welt: Vom 14. bis 16. Juli 2016 veranstaltet das Literarische Colloquium Berlin (LCB, am Wannsee) ein Festival zu Homosexualitäten – „Empfindlichkeiten“ (mehr Infos in der Spex und auf der LCB-Website).

Ich werde das Festival als Liveblogger begleiten… und stelle bis Sonntag mehreren Künstler*innen, Autor*innen und interessierten Besuchern kurze Fragen über Queerness, Widerstand und das Potenzial homosexueller Literatur.

Den Anfang machte Katy Derbyshire (Link). Jetzt…

..

…Kristof Magnusson – Autor, Übersetzer und, beim Festival „Empfindlichkeiten“:

  • am Samstag, 16. Juli, 14 Uhr auf dem Podium „Schrift“, mit Alain Claude Sulzer (Basel), Dieter Ingenschay (Berlin), Édouard Louis (Paris) und Raziel Reid (Vancouver); Moderation: Nina Seiler
  • danach, ab 19 Uhr: mit einer literarischen Kurzlesung auf der Gartenbühne

.

Kristof Magnusson wurde 1976 in Hamburg geboren. Er machte eine Ausbildung als Kirchenmusiker und studierte am Deutschen Literaturinstitut Leipzig. Er übersetzt aus dem Isländischen, veröffentlichte die Romane „Zuhause“, „Das war ich nicht“ und „Arztroman“ und u.a. das Theaterstück „Männerhort“ und lebt in Berlin.

Kristof auf Wikipedia  |  Kristof auf Goodreads

.

01_Eine eigene Arbeit, ein Text, Link oder Bild, der/das mich vorstellt und/oder der/das einen Blick wert ist:

Mein Roman „Zuhause“.

.

02_Wenn mich jemand „homosexueller Autor nennt…

…dann ist das insofern relevant, als bei meiner Arbeit meine Person und meine persönlichen Erfahrungen eine Rolle spielen. Ich schreibe zwar nicht unbedingt biografisch gefärbte Texte, aber etwas mit mir und meinem – homosexuellen – Selbst hat das schon immer zu tun. Ja, es besteht eine Differenz zwischen Werk und Autor, aber es ist eine durchlässige Trennung mit vielen Abstufungen.

.

03_Das Queerste, das ich in meiner Kindheit sah oder kannte, war…

Etwas aus der Popkultur, das ich schon als Kind eindeutig als queer wahrnehmen konnte, war sicher der Pop-Act Frankie Goes To Hollywood. Das war nicht kryptisch und verklausuliert, sondern für jeden erkennbar queer. In meinem persönlichen Umfeld gab es queere Bekannte meiner Eltern und meiner großen Schwester, der Queerste jedoch war sicher mein Onkel Níels aus Island, der ein Kino hatte, in der Freizeit isländische Briefmarken gestaltete und in den Sommerferien nach Kopenhagen fuhr, um Antiquitäten zu kaufen.

.

04_Ein queeres Buch, das mich beeinflusst hat…

Michael Chabon, Die Geheimnisse von Pittsburgh

.

05_Ein anderes Stück queerer Kultur [andere Kunstformen], das mich beeinflusst hat…

Bildende Kunst von Bruce Nauman, und die Shows in Corny Littmanns „Schmidt Theater“ auf der Reeperbahn.

.

06_Ich wünschte, ich hätte in Sachen Homosexualität früher gelernt/gewusst/erfahren, dass…

…es so viele verschiedene queere Lebensweisen gibt. Viele meiner Ängste und Hemmungen hatten – und haben – damit zu tun, dass sich bestimmte falsche, medial verbreitete Bilder festgesetzt haben. Ich hätte gerne viel früher im Leben vielfältige und positiv dargestellte Beispiele für queere Lebensentwürfe gekannt. Und wäre es nur in Soap-Operas im Privatfernsehen gewesen.

[Stefan: nach meiner Wahrnehmung gab es queere Figuren selten in Privat-Soaps… aber durchgängig, 20 Jahre lang, in der öffentlich-rechtlichen „Verbotene Liebe“.]

.

07_Zu viele Menschen denken bei „Homosexualität“ zuerst oder fast nur an schwule Männer. Ich wünschte, stärker in den Fokus rücken…

Ich kann ich nur zustimmend sagen, dass es tatsächlich ein Problem ist, dass der Blick auf Homosexualitäten oft verkürzt ist und bei schwulen Männern endet.

.

08_Eine politische oder öffentliche Figur, über die wir dringend mehr reden müssen. Und eine, über die wir weniger reden sollten:

Das ist eine sehr schwierige Frage, denn wer ist „wir“? Wir als Gesellschaft insgesamt? Dann würde das ja ganz schnell in Richtung Medienkritik gehen (Talkshows, Zeitungen etc.). Oder wir als queere Community? Können wir überhaupt von den Gemeinsamkeiten einer Community ausgehen? Das ist sehr kompliziert.

.

09_Eine queere Figur, ein queerer Star oder eine queere Geschichte aus dem Mainstream, über deren Popularität/Strahlkraft ich mich freue:

Der Mainstream-Erfolg von Ru Paul’s Drag Race ist doch sensationell, oder? Sicher nicht ganz unproblematisch, aber Großen und Ganzen doch ein Zeichen für gesellschaftlichen Fortschritt. Viel mehr als über einen weiteren queeren Star würde ich mich darüber freuen, wenn auch unter schwulen Männern das Bewusstsein dafür wachsen würde, dass queer in erster Linie Vielfalt bedeutet.

.

10_Ich wünschte, folgendes reaktionäre Vorurteil/Denkfigur würde endlich verschwinden/nicht immer wieder neu diskutiert werden:

Ist es nicht frustrierend, dass die Denkfigur des „Natürlichen“ immer wieder hervorgekramt wird? Können sich nicht alle endlich einmal hinter die Ohren schreiben, dass „Natur“ genauso eine kulturelle Konstruktion ist wie quasi alles andere um uns herum?

.

11_Ein queeres guilty pleasure in meinem Leben:

Jim Sharmans Rocky Horror Picture Show. So viele Filme enthalten parodistische Darstellungen von queeren Figuren, die unfair und gemein sind, aber trotzdem sehr witzig. Zählt das dann auch als queeres guilty pleasure?

.

12_Queere Texte handeln oft von Sexualität, Identität/Selbstfindung und Diskriminierung. Andere Themen/Fragen, denen ich in queeren Texten mehr Gewicht wünsche:

Die in der Frage genannten Themen sind nach wie vor selbstverständlich relevant. Und viel mehr als andere Themen wünsche ich mir andere Sichtweisen: neben problemorientierten Darstellungen wünsche ich mir viel mehr positive Darstellungen queerer Lebensrealität. Queere Literatur bedeutet doch auch, queere Inhalte als selbstverständlich, gesund und normal darzustellen.

.

13_Ein Staat, eine Stadt, Region, Kultur oder eine Szene, aus der ich wichtige queere Impulse erhalte (welche?) oder über die wir mehr sprechen müssen:

Reykjavik, wo jedes Jahr über 10 % der isländischen Bevölkerung der Gay Pride Parade zugucken.

.

14_Identität (und: Diskriminierung) wird immer öfter intersektionell beschrieben und diskutiert. Als queere*r Künstler*in interessiert mich aus dieser Perspektive besonders…

Grundsätzlich halte ich eine möglichst diverse Bearbeitung queerer Themen für unbedingt notwendig. Ich selbst spreche als Autor aus der Perspektive eines weißen cis-Manns und möchte mir auch gar nicht anmaßen, qualifiziert über Probleme der Intersektionalität zu reden.

.

15_Der Mainstream räumt Queerness oft mittlerweile etwas mehr Platz ein. Räumt Queerness auch dem Mainstream mehr (zu viel?) Platz ein – in Fragen wie Familien- und Rollenbildern, Selbstdarstellung, Konsum und Politik? Wo reiben sich Queerness und „Normalität“? Reiben sie sich genug?

Davon, dass der Mainstream der Queerness zu viel Platz einräumt kann kaum die Rede sein. Das lässt sich quantitativ einfach belegen. Wie viele Personen weichen auf die eine oder andere Art von der binären heterosexuellen Norm ab (viele), und wie sichtbar ist das im Alltag? (wenig)

Ich persönlich habe zum Glück einen Alltag, in dem wenig Reiberein an queeren Themen vorkommen. Der Literaturbetrieb ist ein grundsätzlich progressives und menschenfreundliches Metier. Dafür bin ich sehr dankbar. Ich bin froh, dass ich – anders als viele andere – nicht in einer Branche arbeite, in der ich im Arbeitsalltag permanent Homophobie ausgesetzt bin.

.

16_Wenn Universitäten und Akademiker auf queere Diskurse (und: Gender-Diskurse) blicken, denke ich…

…dass queere Themen genau so sehr in die Wissenschaft gehören wie alle anderen Bereiche des Lebens. Ich möchte, dass es über queere Themen genau so viel Forschung gibt wie über Politik, Geschichte, Medizin oder Teilchenphysik. Falls diese Frage darauf hinaus laufen sollte, wie ich zu den fachspezifischen Eigenheiten der Gender-Studies stehe, so kann ich die Frage nur mit Sprachkritik beantworten: Akademischer Jargon hat einfach seine Schrullen, da machen Gender-Studies keine Ausnahme.

.

17_Kulturvermittler*innen, Institutionen, Journalist*innen machen, nach meiner Erfahrung, im Umgang mit queerer Kultur manchmal folgenden Fehler:

Mir fällt oft auf, dass mit einem gewissen Exotismus über queere Themen berichtet wird – so als gehöre man als queerer Mensch gleich einer anderen Spezies an. Bitte liebe Institutionen, Kulturvermittler und Journalisten, streicht diesen distanzierten, leicht überraschten Tonfall aus eurem Repertoire, wenn es um queere Themen und Personen geht. Ich habe übrigens bewusst die männliche Form verwendet. Es sind vor allem Männer, deren Sprache über queere Themen von Distanzierungs- und Exotismusformeln beherrscht ist. Eine geschlechterneutrale Darstellung würde Kulturvermittlerinnen und Journalistinnen unfair in Sippenhaft nehmen.

.

18_Wie/wo/wann profitierte ich künstlerisch von meiner eigenen Queerness? Und steht/stand sie mir je im Weg, war sie je eine Schwierigkeit für mich?

Mich irritiert es, dass oft im Nachhinein in die Queerness hineingeheimnisst wird, dass das einem als Autor oder Künstler hilft. An dieser Stelle möchte ich gerne mal den anderen Aspekt in den Vordergrund stellen: Ja, es war schwierig, ja es stand mir oft im Weg. Die viele Zeit in der Jugend, die von Angst, Scham und Unsicherheit geprägt war, darauf hätte ich liebend gern verzichtet. Das Gefühl, dass die Welt eigentlich für andere gemacht ist, nicht für dich, das kann man im Nachhinein vielleicht verklären, weil es möglicherweise den künstlerischen Blick geschärft hat. Schön ist es aber nicht.

Kristof Magnusson, Foto von Gunnar Klack

Kristof Magnusson, Foto von Gunnar Klack

.o

all my 2016 interviews on Queer Literature:

…and, in German:

Kuratoren & Experten am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin: 

Queer Literature: “Empfindlichkeiten” Festival 2016:

Homosexualität am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin: Ronny Matthes vom Festival „Empfindlichkeiten“ im Interview

Presse- und Öffentlichkeitsarbeit fürs Festival "Empfindlichkeiten": Ronny Matthes

Presse- und Öffentlichkeitsarbeit fürs Festival „Empfindlichkeiten“: Ronny Matthes

.

Queere Literatur – aus Europa und der Welt: Vom 14. bis 16. Juli 2016 veranstaltet das Literarische Colloquium Berlin (LCB, am Wannsee) ein Festival zu Homosexualitäten – “Empfindlichkeiten” (mehr Infos in der Spex und auf der LCB-Website).

Ich werde das Festival als Liveblogger begleiten… spreche bis Sonntag mit Künstler*innen, Autor*innen und interessierten Besuchern über Queerness, Widerstand und das Potenzial homosexueller Literatur…

…und, zur Eröffnung, mit Ronny Matthes über das Potenzial und den Kontext des Festivals:

.

Mein Name ist Ronny Matthes. Ich studierte Geistes- und Kunstwissenschaften. Sonst mache ich PR für die Verlage Albino und Bruno Gmünder und schreibe frei für das VICE-Magazin. Für „Empfindlichkeiten“ betreue ich die Presse- und Öffentlichkeitsarbeit.

.

Ist „Empfindlichkeiten“ das erste queere Festival des Literarischen Colloquiums? Warum jetzt?

Besser spät als nie! Das LCB ist die erste große öffentliche literarische Institution, die mit einem solchen Festival aufwartet, ja. Etwas Vergleichbares gab es in Deutschland noch nicht.

.

Ihr habt knapp 40 Autor*innen, Künstler*innen, Performer*innen eingeladen. Es wird Lesungen geben, Gesprächsrunden – was noch?

Es gibt Lesungen, Performances, ein Puppenspiel (!), Diskussionen, Konzerte, Getränke und Speisen, DJ-Sets, Gespräche.

.

Richten sich alle Programmpunkte ans erwachsene Publikum? Oder gibt es auch z.B. queere Jugendbücher? Und wird „Empfindlichkeiten“ sehr akademisch – oder liegt auch queere Unterhaltungs- und Genre-Literatur im Fokus?

Wir haben einen Autor aus dem Genre Young Adult dabei, Raziel Reid. 2014 gewann er mit „Movie Star“ (im engl. Original „When Everything Feels Like the Movies“) den kanadischen Governor General’s Literary Award für die Sparte „Jugendbuch“ und löste damit einen Skandal aus – denn das Buch ist sehr explizit, hart, berührend, schrill, todtraurig.

Ich denke, dass es auch für junge Leute interessant wird: Die geladenen Gäste aus sehr unterschiedlichen Generationen – was man besonders in den Panels/Diskussionsrunden sieht: Da sitzt Ingenschay mit Sulzer mit Louis mit Reid mit Magnusson. Allzu akademisch, hoffe ich, wird es nicht. Sicherlich lassen sich viele Diskussionen nicht ohne spezifisches Vokabular führen. Aber mein Wunsch ist, dass das Festival allen zugänglich ist, auch sprachlich.

Als „queere Genreliteratur“ verstehen sich sicherlich die wenigsten der geladenen Autor_innen. Viele sind ja bei Mainstream-Verlagen und nicht bei queeren/schwulen/lesbischen Kleinverlagen. Eher als: Queer, im Mainstream angekommen.

.

Welche neuen und oder internationalen Namen legst du uns besonders ans Herz?

Saleem Haddad und Raziel Reid – sicherlich die neuesten und jüngsten Stimmen im Programm. Etablierter mittlerweile: Edouard Louis.

.

Hast du aktuelle queere Buchtipps? Aus dem Festivalprogramm… und außerhalb?

Haddads „Guapa“ kommt hoffentlich bald auf Deutsch. Dann eben Reids „Movie Star“. Edouard Louis‘ „Das Ende von Eddy“ ist gerade als Taschenbuch erschienen. Nicht auf dem Festival, aber von mir empfohlen: Karen-Susan Fessels „Bilder von ihr“ – ein Klassiker der lesbischen Literatur, neu aufgelegt. Außerdem „Wir Propagandisten“ von Gabriel Wolkenfeld und „Jetzt sind wir jung“ von Julian Mars.

.

Hilft das LCB queeren Künstler*innen aus Ländern, die Homosexualität kriminalisieren? Wie?

Falls Einladen als Hilfe gilt: Wir kümmern uns um Visum, Unterbringung, Kost und Logis. Außerdem sind wir an einem langfristigen Kontakt mit diesen Autor_innen interessiert. (Wie mit allen, mit denen wir zusammenarbeiten.)

.

Wie hat sich das Festival im Lauf der Planung verändert? Musstet ihr etwas umschmeißen oder neu denken? Worauf freust du dich besonders?

Die Kulturstiftung des Bundes hat das Projekt im Frühjahr 2016 bewilligt. Sicherlich fanden aber schon vorher Planungen statt. Ich wurde ins Boot geholt, als das Konzept schon stand: Die künstlerische Leitung liegt bei Thorsten Dönges und Samanta Gorzelniak. Ich freue mich besonders auf den Mix aus Lesungen, Diskussionen und Musik – weil es verspricht, keine akademische Selbstbespiegelung zu werden, sondern ein Festival für alle. Man kann sich die Rosinen herauspicken.

.

Macht die Pressearbeit Mühe? Sind Nischen- und Szene-Plattformen offener fürs Festival – und wird Homosexualität noch immer zuerst als „sexuell“ gelesen/begriffen?

Presse fürs LCB macht Spaß und Mühe. Spaß, weil es bei den Medien einen Vertrauensvorschuss bringt, für eine etablierte Institution zu arbeiten: Man kennt sich und berichtet gern. Mühe, weil auch 2016 Medienvertreter_innen zusammenzucken, wenn das Wort „Homosexualität“ fällt. Bei Medienvertreter_innen, die man persönlich kennt und die selbst schwul/lesbisch sind, ist der Zugang sicherlich einfacher. Der Queerspiegel [queere Sonderseiten im Berliner Tagesspiegel] z.B. widmet „Empfindlichkeiten“ eine Online-Serie mit Autoren-Statements und heute, Donnerstag, auch ein großes Print-Feature. Aber auch nicht-schwul/lesbische Medien waren interessiert – Zeitungen, Zeitschriften, Print und Online, Blogs und Radio.

.

Warum der Titel „Empfindlichkeiten“?

Der Name kommt vom Roman- und Glossenzyklus „Die Geschichte der Empfindlichkeit“ von Hubert Fichte.

Fichte hielt sich 1963/64 am Literarischen Colloquium auf und verarbeitete diese Zeit im dritten Band der Geschichte der Empfindlichkeit, dem Glossenband „Die Zweite Schuld“.

„Gibt es so etwas wie einen Stil der Homosexuellen, gibt es homosexuelle Romanciers im Gegensatz zu Schriftstellern mit homosexuellen Neigungen? Henry James veräppelt Mrs. Penniman, die Wörter kursiv setzt. Henry James setzt kursiv, in Anführungsstriche, in Klammern. Schwule Sprache ist uneigentlich, ist indirekte Sprache. Nirgends so viele Anführungsstriche wie auf dem Plakat zum Faschingsfest in der Stricherbar. Aber sind Sousentendus, Verfremdungen, Übertreibungen, Ironie, Travestie bei Henry James häufiger als bei Guy de Maupassant oder bei Norman Mailer – die Wahl der Beispiele drückt kein Qualitätsurteil aus –, es ist nur so schwer, erklärt heterosexuelle Schriftsteller zu finden. Von homosexuellen Autoren, von homosexueller Literatur sprechen, setzt voraus, daß es heterosexuellen literarischen Stil gibt, heterosexuelle Kriteria. Und: Kann es die Aufgabe der Literaturkritik sein, biologistische Kriterien zu kanonisieren, die von den Biologen jede Saison ausgewechselt werden?“

.

Hubert Fichte starb 1986. Ist er wirklich noch immer das Nonplusultra für anspruchsvolle schwule Literatur, im deutschsprachigen Raum?

Als jemand, der sich viel mit schwulen Autoren beschäftigt: Fichte ist wichtig, aber auch outdated. In meinem Bekanntenkreis haben fast nur die Ü40-jährigen etwas von ihm gelesen. Das ist schade, denn gerade sein „Versuch über die Pubertät“ ist ein zeitloser Text, der Pflichtlektüre in Schulen werden sollte.

.

Outdated – inwiefern?

Die Sprache ist aus heutiger Sicht sehr unzugänglich, finde ich. Aus der Zeit gefallene Bilder, viel Stricherromantik, viel Klappen, viel heute-nicht-mehr-Existierendes aus der schwulen Subkultur der 70er und 80er.

.

Viele Freunde von mir kennen ihn vom Namen her – aber wissen nicht, dass er schwul (bisexuell?) war, weil Zeitungsartikel oft viel über seine Freundschaft/Beziehung zur Fotografin Leonore Mau sprechen. Oder er wird als Hamburg-Autor, Lokal-Autor, Kneipen-, Szene-, früher Pop-Autor erinnert.

Fichte war ja jemand, der sein literarisches Schaffen gerade über die eigene Homo-/Bisexualität definierte. In meiner Eigenwahrnehmung habe ich immer mehr Fichte auf dem Schirm als Mau. Ich könnte mir aber erklären, warum es manche so wahrnehmen, als wenn Mau mehr rezipiert wird: Bild schlägt Text, ist zugänglicher, schneller erfassbar, mit einem Blick umfassend gesehen.

.

Ist Fichtes „Die zweite Schuld“ lesenswert? Erfahre ich viel über das Literarische Colloquium vor 50 Jahren?

Das sind hinreißende Interviews (Fichtes große Stärke!) und Tagebuchskizzen. Übers LCB selbst erfährt man nicht so viel – vielmehr über die Personen, die es mit Leben füllten. Von bitterböse bis charmant, immer brutal ehrlich, selten schmeichelhaft, schildert Fichte die Menschen am LCB zur Gründungszeit. Wer etwas für Literaturgeschichte übrig hat, sollte es unbedingt lesen.

.

Wo wird sonst in Berlin über queere Literatur gesprochen? Hast du Tipps?

Die „Literatunten“ und das „Queere Literarische Quartett“ im Prinz Eisenherz Buchladen sind die beiden „Institutionen“, die ich nennen und empfehlen kann. Sonst auch in den Feuilletons der Stadt, im Queerspiegel des Tagesspiegels und im Buchteil der Siegessäule.

.

Erlebst du, dass sich Autor*innen verbitten, als queerer Autor gesehen, rezipiert, verstanden zu werden? Oder nimmt jeder dieses Label an?

Bisher hat sich niemand beschwert. Aber das wird sich sicher in den Diskussionen zeigen. Denn: What’s queer today is not queer tomorrow.

.

Weißt du von ungeouteten prominenten Autor*innen? Oder ist das im Literaturbetrieb kein Thema?

Ich kenne nur Gerüchte um nicht-geoutete Fußballer. Ich glaube, in der Domäne Literatur ist das große Tabu um Homosexualität nicht mehr so wirkmächtig wie z.B. im Sport, in der Kirche, in der Armee…

.

Wer sind für dich die wichtigsten queeren deutschsprachigen Stimmen, aktuell?

Sicherlich Antje Rávic Strubel, Alain-Claude Sulzer, verlegerisch Joachim Bartholomae, der sich selbst ja schon seit Jahrzehnten an den Fragen, die beim Festival verhandelt werden, abarbeitet.

.

Wen würdest du gern das nächste Mal einladen? Gibt es ein nächstes Mal?

Falls es ein nächstes Mal gibt, was ich hoffe: definitiv Edmund White, solange er noch lebt, und Alexis De Veaux. Und unbedingt Garth Greenwell! Ein sehr vielversprechendes Debüt.

.

Du bist selbst queer? Was macht queere Literatur mit dir? Und: Warum sollten Hetero-Leser*innen mitlesen, sich angesprochen fühlen?

Ich definiere mich selbst als schwulen Mann, kann aber mit dem Label „queer“ viel anfangen, sofern es nicht in die post-moderne Beliebigkeit rutscht. Hetero-Leser_innen sollten sich von queerer Literatur angesprochen fühlen, weil Fragestellungen, Probleme, Themen in viel queerer Literatur universell sind. Außerdem bereichert ein queerer Blick auf Altbekanntes den Horizont.

.

Zu Menschen, die noch auf der Kippe stehen, ob sie „Empfindlichkeiten“ besuchen, sagst du…?

Eine Fahrt an den Wannsee hat noch keiner und keinem geschadet, und ihr werdet euch beim Durchblättern des Readers danach ärgern, wenn ihr seht, was für spannende Fragen verhandelt wurden. Empfindlichkeiten ist sicherlich die einmalige Chance, so viele queere Autor_innen auf einem Haufen zu sehen und tatsächlich mit ihnen diskutieren zu können – nicht nur Wasserglaslesungen zu sehen, sondern tatsächlich in den Diskurs zu treten. Außerdem verpasst ihr das beste Catering Kreuzbergs: Der Südblock kocht.

.o

all my 2016 interviews on Queer Literature:

…and, in German:

Kuratoren & Experten am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin: 

Queer Literature: “Empfindlichkeiten” Festival 2016: