Feminismus

Vielfalt, Feminismus, Social Justice: die besten Romane & Sachbücher 2019

0230 Norwegen 2019 Ehrengast, Gastland der Frankfurter Buchmesse - Hurtigruten, Stefan Mesch (85)

.

ca. 12mal im Jahr blogge ich lange Buchtipp-Listen.

heute:

Titel, erschienen 2019 auf Englisch, vorgemerkt, angelesen und gemocht, denen ich schnell eine Übersetzung ins Deutsche wünsche. [Jugendbücher, Young Adult blogge ich separat, zum Jahresende, wie hier 2018.]

Fast alle Bücher sind von Frauen und/oder Menschen of Color und/oder queeren Personen. 45 Titel – mit Klappentexten, gekürzt:

.

01 Diversity Literature 2019 Bernardine Evaristo, Taylor Jenkins Reid, Ali Smith

Bernardine Evaristo, „Girl, Woman, Other“: „A love song to modern Britain and black womanhood. 12 very different characters – mostly women, black and British, across the country and through the years. Joyfully polyphonic and vibrantly contemporary.“

Taylor Jekins Reid, „Daisy Jones & the Six“:Everyone knows Daisy Jones & The Six, but nobody knows the reason behind their split at the absolute height of their popularity. Daisy is a girl coming of age in L.A. in the late sixties, sneaking into clubs on the Sunset Strip, sleeping with rock stars. The Six is a band led by the brooding Billy Dunne. On the eve of their first tour, his girlfriend Camila finds out she’s pregnant. Daisy and Billy cross paths when a producer puts them together. A novel, written as an oral history of one of the biggest bands of the seventies.

Ali Smith, „Spring“: On the heels of Autumn and Winter comes Spring, the continuation of Ali Smith’s celebrated Seasonal Quartet, a series of stand-alone novels, separate but interconnected (as the seasons are), wide-ranging in timescale and light-footed through histories.“

.

02 Diversity Literature 2019 Catherine Chung, Mary Doria Russell, Karl Marlantes

Catherine Chung, „The Tenth Muse“:From childhood, Katherine knows she is different, and that her parents are not who they seem to be. As a mathematician, on her quest to conquer the Riemann Hypothesis, the greatest unsolved mathematical problem of her time, she turns to a theorem with a mysterious history that holds both the lock and key to her identity, and to secrets during World War II in Germany. She finds kinship in the stories of the women who came before her, their love of the language of numbers connecting them across generations.“

Mary Doria Russell, „The Women of Copper Country“: „In July 1913, twenty-five-year-old Annie Clements had seen enough of the world to know that it was unfair. She’s spent her whole life in the copper-mining town of Calumet, Michigan where men risk their lives for meager salaries—and had barely enough to put food on the table. The women labor in the houses of the elite, and send their husbands and sons deep underground each day. An authentic and moving historical portrait of the lives of the men and women of the early 20th century labor movement.

Karl Marlantes, „Deep River“:Born into a farm family in late nineteenth-century Finland, the three Koski siblings— are brought up on the virtue of maintaining their sisu in the face of increasing hardship, especially after their nationalist father is arrested by imperial Russian authorities, never to be seen again. Lured by the prospects of the Homestead Act, Ilmari and Matti set sail for America. The politicized young Aino, haunted by the specter of betrayal after her Marxist cell is disastrously exposed, follows soon after. A logging community in southern Washington.“

.

03 Diversity Literature 2019 Mary Beth Keane, Elizabeth Gilbert, Elin Hilderbrand

Mary Beth Keane, „Ask again, yes“: „Two neighboring families in a suburban town, the bond between their children, a tragedy that reverberates over four decades. Francis Gleeson and Brian Stanhope, two rookie cops in the NYPD, live next door to each other. Ask Again, Yes reveals the way childhood memories change when viewed from the distance of adulthood—villains lose their menace and those who appeared innocent seem less so.“

Elizabeth Gilbert, „City of Girls“: „The New York City theater world, told from the perspective of an older woman as she looks back on her youth: female sexuality and promiscuity. In 1940, nineteen-year-old Vivian Morris has just been kicked out of Vassar College. Her affluent parents send her to Manhattan to live with her Aunt Peg, who owns a flamboyant, crumbling midtown theater. When Vivian makes a personal mistake that results in professional scandal, it turns her new world upside down in ways that it will take her years to fully understand.“

Elin Hilderbrand, „Summer of 69“: „Welcome to the most tumultuous summer of the twentieth century! It’s 1969. The children of the Levin family have looked forward to spending the summer at their grandmother’s historic home in downtown Nantucket: but this year Blair, the oldest sister, is marooned in Boston, pregnant with twins and unable to travel. Middle sister Kirby, a nursing student, is caught up in the thrilling vortex of civil rights protests. Only son Tiger is an infantry soldier, recently deployed to Vietnam. Thirteen-year-old Jessie suddenly feels like an only child.

.

04 Diversity Literature 2019 Tope Folarin, Tina Chang, Cherrie Moraga

Tope Folarin, „A Particular Kind of Black Man“: „A Nigerian family living in Utah and their uncomfortable assimilation to American life: Though Tunde speaks English with a Midwestern accent, he can’t escape the children who rub his skin and ask why the black won’t come off. Tunde’s father, ever the optimist, works tirelessly chasing his American dream while his wife, lonely in Utah without family and friends, sinks deeper into schizophrenia. Then one otherwise-ordinary morning, Tunde’s mother wakes him with a hug, bundles him and his baby brother into the car, and takes them away from the only home they’ve ever known. Once Tunde’s father tracks them down, she flees to Nigeria, and Tunde never feels at home again.“

Tina Chang, „Hybrida. Poems“: „Chang confronts the complexities of raising a mixed-race child during an era of political upheaval in the United States. Meditating on the lives of Michael Brown, Leiby Kletzky, and Noemi Álvarez Quillay—lost at the hands of individuals entrusted to protect them—Chang creates hybrid poetic forms that mirror her investigation of racial tensions. Hybrida is a twenty-first-century tale that is equal parts a mother’s love and her fury.

Cherrie Moraga, „Native Country of the Heart“: „The mother, Elvira, was hired out as a child, along with her siblings, by their own father to pick cotton in California’s Imperial Valley. The daughter, Cherríe Moraga, is a brilliant, pioneering, queer Latina feminist. As Moraga charts her mother’s journey–from impressionable young girl to battle-tested matriarch to, later on, an old woman suffering under the yoke of Alzheimer’s–she traces her own self-discovery of her gender-queer body and Lesbian identity.“

.

05 Diversity Literature 2019 Jia Tolentino, Kenra Allen, Amber Tamblyn

Jia Tolentino, „Trick Mirror. Reflections on Self-Delusion“: „A book about the incentives that shape us, and about how hard it is to see ourselves clearly in a culture that revolves around the self. In each essay, Jia writes about the cultural prisms that have shaped her: the rise of the nightmare social internet; the American scammer as millennial hero; the literary heroine’s journey from brave to blank to bitter; the mandate that everything, including our bodies, should always be getting more efficient and beautiful until we die.“

Kendra Allen, „When you learn the Alphabet“: „A first collection of essays about things Kendra Allen never learned to let go of. Unifying personal narrative and cultural commentary, Allen allots space for large moments of tenderness and empathy for all black bodies—but especially all black woman bodies.“

Amber Tamblyn, „Era of Ignition. Coming of Age in a Time of Rage and Revolution“: „Through her fierce op-eds in media outlets such as the New York Times, Glamour, and Hollywood Reporter and her work as a founder of the Time’s Up organization, [actress] Tamblyn has tackled discrimination, sexual assault, reproductive rights, and pay parity.“

.

06 Diversity Literature 2019 Hallie Rubenhold, Karen Tongson, Emily Nussbaum

Hallie Rubenhold, „The Five. The untold Lives of the Women killed by Jack the Ripper“: „Polly, Annie, Elizabeth, Catherine and Mary-Jane never met. They came from Fleet Street, Knightsbridge, Wolverhampton, Sweden and Wales. They wrote ballads, ran coffee houses, lived on country estates, breathed ink-dust from printing presses and escaped people-traffickers. What they had in common was the year of their murders: 1888. For more than a century, newspapers have been keen to tell us that ‘the Ripper’ preyed on prostitutes. Not only is this untrue, as historian Hallie Rubenhold has discovered, it has prevented the real stories of these fascinating women from being told.“

Karen Tongson, „Why Karen Carpenter matters“: „Uplifting harmonies and sunny lyrics that propelled Karen Carpenter and her brother, Richard, to international fame. Karen died at age thirty-two from the effects of an eating disorder. Karen Tongson (whose Filipino musician parents named her after the pop icon) interweaves the story of the singer’s rise to fame with her own trans-Pacific journey between the Philippines–where imitations of American pop styles flourished–and Karen Carpenter’s home ground of Southern California. Tongson reveals why the Carpenters‘ chart-topping, seemingly whitewashed musical fantasies of „normal love“ can now have profound significance for her–as well as for other people of color, LGBT+ communities, and anyone outside the mainstream culture usually associated with Karen Carpenter’s legacy. This hybrid of memoir and biography excavates the destructive perfectionism at the root of the Carpenters‘ sound, while finding the beauty in the singer’s all too brief life.“

Emily Nussbaum, „I like to watch. Arguing my Way through the TV Revolution“: „From 2004 to her Pulitzer Prize–winning columns for The New Yorker, Emily Nussbaum has known all along that what we watch is who we are. Her passion for television began with stumbling upon „Buffy the Vampire Slayer“. What followed was a love affair with television, an education, and a fierce debate about whose work gets to be called “great” that led Nussbaum to a trailblazing career as a critic. She traces the evolution of female protagonists over the last decade, the complex role of sexual violence on TV, and what to do about art when the artist is revealed to be a monster.It’s a book that celebrates television as television, even as each year warps the definition of just what that might mean.“

.

07 Diversity Literature 2019 Darcy Lockman, Jared Yates Sexton, Rachel Louise Snyder

Darcy Lockman, „All the Rage. Mothers, Fathers, and the Myth of Equal Partnership“: „In an era of seemingly unprecedented feminist activism, enlightenment, and change, data show that one area of gender inequality stubbornly remains: the unequal amount of parental work that falls on women, no matter their class or professional status. How can a commitment to fairness in marriage melt away upon the arrival of children?“

Jared Yates Sexton, „The Man they wanted me to be. Toxic Masculinity and a Crisis of our own Making“: „Both memoir and cultural analysis, Jared Yates Sexton alternates between an examination of his working class upbringing and historical, psychological, and sociological sources that examine toxic masculinity. Globalism shifts labor away from traditional manufacturing, the roles that have been prescribed to men since the Industrial Revolution have been rendered as obsolete. Donald Trump’s campaign successfully leveraged male resentment and entitlement, and now, with Trump as president and the rise of the #MeToo movement, it’s clearer than ever what a problem performative masculinity is. Deeply personal and thoroughly researched, The Man They Wanted Me to Be examines how we teach boys what’s expected of men in America, and the long term effects of that socialization—which include depression, suicide, misogyny, and, ultimately, shorter lives. Sexton turns his keen eye to the establishment of the racist patriarchal structure which has favored white men, and investigates the personal and societal dangers of such outdated definitions of manhood.“

Rachel Louise Snyder, „No visible Bruises. What we don’t know about Domestic Violence can kill us“: „We call it domestic violence. We call it private violence. Sometimes we call it intimate terrorism. But we generally do not believe it has anything at all to do with us, despite the World Health Organization deeming it a “global epidemic.” Snyder gives context for what we don’t know we’re seeing. The common myths? That if things were bad enough, victims would just leave; that a violent person cannot become nonviolent; that shelter is an adequate response; that violence inside the home is separate from other forms of violence like mass shootings. Through the stories of victims, perpetrators, law enforcement, and reform movements from across the country, Snyder explores its far-reaching consequences for society, and what it will take to truly address it.“

.

08 Diversity Literature 2019 Mariam Khan, Nikesh Shukla, Chimene Suleyman, Margaret Busby

Mariam Khan, „It’s not about the Burqua“: „When was the last time you heard a Muslim woman speak for herself without a filter? In 2016, Mariam Khan read that David Cameron had linked the radicalization of Muslim men to the ‘traditional submissiveness’ of Muslim women. Mariam felt pretty sure she didn’t know a single Muslim woman who would describe herself that way. Why was she hearing about Muslim women from people who were neither Muslim, nor female? Here are voices you won’t see represented in the national news headlines: seventeen Muslim women speaking frankly about the hijab and wavering faith, about love and divorce, about feminism, queer identity, sex, and the twin threats of a disapproving community and a racist country. According to the media, it’s all about the burqa. Here’s what it’s really about.

Nikesh Shukla & Chimene Suleyman, „The Good Immigrant. 26 Writers reflect on America“: „An urgent collection of essays by first and second-generation immigrants, exploring what it’s like to be othered in an increasingly divided America. Powerful personal stories of living between cultures and languages.“

Margaret Busby, „New Daughters of Africa. An international Anthology of Writing by Women of African Descent“: „This major new international anthology brings together the work of over 200 women writers of African descent and charts a contemporary literary canon from 1900. A magnificent follow-up to Margaret Busby’s original landmark anthology, Daughters of Africa, this new companion volume brings together fresh and vibrant voices that have emerged in the last 25 years. New Daughters of Africa also testifies to a wealth of genres: autobiography, memoirs, oral history, letters, diaries, short stories, novels, poetry, drama, humour, politics, journalism, essays and speeches. Amongst the 200 contributors are: Patience Agbabi, Sefi Atta, Ayesha Harruna Attah, Malorie Blackman, Tanella Boni, Diana Evans, Bernardine Evaristo, Aminatta Forna, Danielle Legros Georges, Bonnie Greer, Andrea Levy, Imbolo Mbue, Yewande Omotoso, Nawal El Saadawi, Taiye Selasi, Warsan Shire, Zadie Smith and Andrea Stuart. Extraordinary literary achievements of Black women writers whose voices, despite on going discussions, remain under-represented and underrated.“

.

09 Diversity Literature 2019 Margaret Hagerman, Clementine Ford, Donna Zuckerberg

Margaret A. Hagerman, „White Kids. Growing up with Privilege in a racially divided America“: „Riveting stories of how affluent, white children learn about race. Sociologist Margaret A. Hagerman zeroes in on affluent, white kids to observe how they make sense of privilege, unequal educational opportunities, and police violence. In fascinating detail, Hagerman considers the role that they and their families play in the reproduction of racism and racial inequality in America. White Kids, based on two years of research involving in-depth interviews with white kids and their families, explores questions such as, „How do white kids learn about race when they grow up in families that do not talk openly about race or acknowledge its impact?“ and „What about children growing up in families with parents who consider themselves to be ‚anti-racist‘?“ By observing families in their everyday lives, this book explores the extent to which white families, even those with anti-racist intentions, reproduce and reinforce the forms of inequality they say they reject.“ [2018]

Clementine Ford, „Boys will be Boys. Power, Patriarchy and the toxic Bonds of Mateship“: ‘How do I raise my son to respect women and give them equal space in the world? How do I make sure he’s a supporter and not a perpetrator?’ Our world conditions boys into entitlement, privilege and power at the expense not just of girls’ humanity but also of their own.“ [2018]

Donna Zuckerberg, „Not all dead white men. Classics and Misogyny in the Digital Age“: „A disturbing exposé of how today’s alt-right men’s groups use ancient sources to promote a new brand of toxic masculinity online. A virulent strain of antifeminism is thriving online: People cite ancient Greek and Latin texts to support their claims–arguing that they articulate a model of masculinity that sustained generations but is now under siege. Online, pickup artists quote Ovid’s Ars Amatoria to justify ignoring women’s boundaries.“ [2018]

.

10 Diversity Literature 2019 David Wallace-Wells, Dave Cullen, Max Williams

David Wallace-Wells, „The Uninhabitle Earth. Life after Warming“: „If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible. Without a revolution in how billions of humans conduct their lives, parts of the Earth could become close to uninhabitable, and other parts horrifically inhospitable, as soon as the end of this century.“

Dave Cullen, „Parkland“: „The author of Columbine offers a deeply moving account of the teenage survivors of the Parkland shooting who pushed back against the NRA and Congressional leaders and launched the March for Our Lives movement. Four days after escaping Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, two dozen extraordinary kids announced the audacious March for Our Lives. A month later, it was the fourth largest protest in American history. Dave Cullen, who has been reporting on the epidemic of school shootings for two decades, takes us along on the students’ nine-month odyssey to the midterms and beyond. The Parkland students are genuinely candid about their experiences. We see them cope with shattered friendships and PTSD, along with the normal day-to-day struggles of school.“

Max William, „Heydrich. Dark Shadow of the SS“: „Himmler’s SS organisation was the ideal tool to execute Hitler’s plans. From an early age, Reinhard Heydrich was determined to succeed at every challenge he encountered. An ambitious sportsman, a loving family man, and a ruthless executive, Heydrich possessed all the qualities necessary to carry out Hitler’s policy in Himmler’s name. This book illustrates the life of the architect of genocide, his background, his upbringing, his family, and his career, which developed into engineering one of the greatest crimes in history.“

.

11 Diversity Literature 2019 Caroline Criado Perez, Nimko Ali, Cinzia Arruzza, Thi Bhattacharya, Nancy Fraser

Caroline Criado Perez, „Invisible Women. Data Bias in a World designed for Men“: „Imagine a world where your phone is too big for your hand, where your doctor prescribes a drug that is wrong for your body, where in a car accident you are 47% more likely to be seriously injured. Invisible Women shows us how, in a world largely built for and by men, we are systematically ignoring half the population.“

Nimko Ali, „What we’re told not to talk about. Women’s Voices from East London to Nigeria“: „This book is about vaginas. Fanny, cunt, flower, foo-foo, tuppence, whatever you want to call it almost half of the world’s population has one. Was Jessica Ennis on her period they day she won Olympic Gold? What does it feeling like to have a poo after you’ve given birth? From refugee camps in Calais to Oscar-winning actresses, to Nimko’s own story of living with FGM, each woman shares their own relationship with their vagina and its impact on their life.“

Chinzia Arruzza, Tithi Bhattacharya, Nancy Fraser: „Feminism for the 99 %. A Manifesto“: „Recent years have seen the emergence of massive feminist mobilizations around the world, offering an alternative to the liberal feminism that has become the handmaiden of capitalism and of Islamophobia. These new movements have taken aim at neoliberalism’s economic violence, the violence of xenophobic migratory policies, as well as the violence of imperialist military interventions and of environmental disasters. Looking to women mobilizing in Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Poland, Italy, Spain, Turkey, and other countries, the authors lay out a compelling set of demands. It is a manifesto that seeks to retrieve a radical and subversive feminism, for the emergence of an international anticapitalist feminist network.“

.

12 Diversity Literature 2019 Shaun David Hutchinson, David K. Johnson, Hugh Ryan

Shaun David Hutchinson, „Brave Face. How I survided growing up, coming out and Depression“: „What led to an attempted suicide in his teens? “I wasn’t depressed because I was gay. I was depressed and gay.” Shaun David Hutchinson was nineteen. Struggling to find the vocabulary to understand and accept who he was and how he fit into a community in which he couldn’t see himself.“

David K. Johnson, „Buying Gay. How Physique Entrepreneurs sparked a Movement“:In 1951, a new type of publication appeared on newsstands–the physique magazine produced by and for gay men. For many men growing up in the 1950s and 1960s, these magazines and their images and illustrations of nearly naked men, as well as articles, letters from readers, and advertisements, served as an initiation into gay culture. This has often been seen as peripheral to the gay political movement. David K. Johnson shows how gay commerce was not a byproduct but rather an important catalyst for the gay rights movement. Buying Gay explores the connections–and tensions–between the market and the movement. With circulation rates many times higher than the openly political „homophile“ magazines, physique magazines were the largest gay media outlets of their time.“

Hugh Ryan, „When Brooklyn was queer“: „Brooklyn’s vibrant and forgotten queer history, from the mid-1850s up to the present day. Not only has Brooklyn always lived in the shadow of queer Manhattan neighborhoods like Greenwich Village and Harlem, but there has also been a systematic erasure of its queer history. Folks like Ella Wesner and Florence Hines, the most famous drag kings of the late-1800s; E. Trondle, a transgender man whose arrest in Brooklyn captured headlines for weeks in 1913; Hamilton Easter Field, whose art commune in Brooklyn Heights nurtured Hart Crane and John Dos Passos; Mabel Hampton, a black lesbian who worked as a dancer at Coney Island in the 1920s; Gustave Beekman, the Brooklyn brothel owner at the center of a WWII gay Nazi spy scandal; and Josiah Marvel, a curator at the Brooklyn Museum who helped create a first-of-its-kind treatment program for gay men arrested for public sex in the 1950s.“

.

13 Diversity Literature 2019 Tressie McMillan Cottom, Grace Talusan, Maia Kobabe

Tressie McMillan Cottom, „Thick: and other Essays“: Smart, humorous, and strikingly original thoughts on race, beauty, money by one of today’s most intrepid public intellectuals A modern black American female voice waxing poetic on self and society, serving up a healthy portion of clever prose and southern aphorisms in a style uniquely her own. The political, the social, and the personal are almost always one and the same.“

Grace Talusan, „The Body Papers. A Memoir“: „Sexual abuse, depression, cancer, and life as a Filipino immigrant: Born in the Philippines, young Grace Talusan moves with her family to a New England suburb in the 1970s. At school, she confronts racism as one of the few kids with a brown face. At home, the confusion is worse: her grandfather’s nightly visits to her room leave her hurt and terrified, and she learns to build a protective wall of silence that maps onto the larger silence practiced by her Catholic Filipino family. Talusan learns as a teenager that her family’s legal status in the country has always hung by a thread—for a time, they were “illegal.” Family, she’s told, must be put first.“

Maia Kobabe, „Gender Queer. A Memoir“: „Maia uses e/em/eir pronouns. Maia’s intensely cathartic autobiography charts eir journey of self-identity, which includes grappling with how to come out to family and society and bonding with friends over erotic gay fanfiction. Started as a way to explain to eir family what it means to be nonbinary and asexual, Gender Queer is more than a personal story: it is a useful and touching guide on gender identity–what it means and how to think about it.bereits gelesen: große Empfehlung!

.

14 Diversity Literature 2019 Mira Jacob, Ines Estrada, Lucy Knisley

Mira Jacob, „Good Talk. A Memoir in Conversations“: „Like many six-year-olds, Mira Jacob’s half-Jewish, half-Indian son, Z, has questions about everything. At first they are innocuous enough, but as tensions from the 2016 election spread into the family, they become much, much more complicated. Trying to answer him honestly, Mira has to think back to where she’s gotten her own answers: her most formative conversations about race, color, sexuality, and, of course, love. This graphic memoir is a love letter to the art of conversation.“

Inés Estrada, „Alienation“: „Drawn in hazy gray pencil and printed in blue pantone ink, this graphic novel is about Elizabeth, an exotic dancer in cyberspace, and Carlos, who was just fired from the last human-staffed oil rig, attempting to keep their romance alive. When they realize that their bodies are full of artificial organs and they live almost entirely online, they begin to question what being human actually means.

Lucy Knisley, „Kid Gloves. Nine Months of Careful Chaos“: „If you work hard enough, if you want it enough, if you’re smart and talented and “good enough,” you can do anything. Except get pregnant. Her whole life, Lucy Knisley wanted to be a mother. But when it was finally the perfect time, conceiving turned out to be harder than anything she’d ever attempted. Fertility problems were followed by miscarriages, and her eventual successful pregnancy plagued by health issues, up to a dramatic, near-death experience during labor and delivery. This moving, hilarious, and surprisingly informative memoir not only follows Lucy’s personal transition into motherhood but also illustrates the history and science of reproductive health from all angles.“

.

15 Diversity Literature 2019 Ada Hoffmann, Kameron Hurley, Guy Gavriel Kay

Ada Hoffmann, „The Outside“: „Autistic scientist Yasira Shien has developed a radical new energy drive that could change the future of humanity. But when she activates it, reality warps, destroying the space station and everyone aboard. The AI Gods who rule the galaxy declare her work heretical, and Yasira is abducted by their agents. Instead of simply executing her, they offer mercy – if she’ll help them hunt down a bigger target: her own mysterious, vanished mentor. Yasira must choose who to trust: the gods and their ruthless post-human angels, or the rebel scientist whose unorthodox mathematics could turn her world inside out.

Kameron Hurley, „The Light Brigade“: „A futuristic war during which soldiers are broken down into light in order to get them to the front lines on Mars. Dietz, a fresh recruit in the infantry, begins to experience combat drops that don’t sync up with the platoon’s. Is Dietz really experiencing the war differently, or is it combat madness? A worthy successor to classic stories like Downbelow Station, Starship Troopers, and The Forever War: a gritty time-bending take on the future of war.“

Guy Gavriel Kay, „A Brightness Long Ago“: „Set in a world evoking early Renaissance Italy: Danio Cerra’s fate changed the moment he saw Adria Ripoli as she entered the count’s chambers one autumn night–intending to kill. Born to power, Adria had chose a life of danger–and freedom. A healer determined to defy her expected lot; a charming, frivolous son of immense wealth; a powerful religious leader more decadent than devout: both a compelling drama and a deeply moving reflection on the nature of memory.“

Die besten Comics & Graphic Novels 2018: meine Empfehlungen bei Deutschlandfunk Kultur

.

meine 20 Lieblings-Comics 2015, kurz vorgestellt: Link

meine 20 Lieblings-Comics 2016, kurz vorgestellt: Link

meine 20 Lieblings-Comics 2017, kurz vorgestellt: Link

.

heute: meine Top 20 fürs Jahr 2018.

Ausführliche Texte etc. kurz nach Weihnachten bei Deutschlandfunk Kultur.

.

20. Flavor

Autor: Joseph Keatinge, Zeichner: Wook Jin Clark.

Image Comics, seit Mai 2018.

6+ Hefte in 1+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

.

.

Schnelles Geld für Verlage. Dazu eine Leserschaft, die oft zu unkritisch bewertet: Seit Raina Telgemeiers fadem Zahnspangen-Bericht „Smile“ (2010) wollen Middle-Grade-Comics extra-simpel, weich, harmlos-progressiv belehren. Lesen auf Stützrädern, für 8- bis 12-Jährige. „Flavor“ mischt bewährte Ideen aus „Wallace & Gromit“, „Kikis kleiner Lieferservice“ und „Avatar: Herr der Elemente“. Eine Märchenstadt hinter Festungsmauern feiert Kulinarik, Restaurants und eine Akademie für Elite-Köchinnen und Köche. Eine fadenscheinige, kindische Welt, die sich allein ums Essen dreht: geheime Koch-Fight-Clubs im Untergrund! Hetzjagden um besonders edle Pilze! Harte Kerle und Gauner trinken nicht – sondern zechen in Eiscreme-Kaschemmen. Detailverliebt gezeichnet. Doch mir fehlt Pfeffer. Eine eigene Note!

Sammelband 1 lässt vieles unklar: Anant, Sohn aus bestem Haus, kämpft um seinen Platz an der Akademie. Heldin Xoo führt einen Imbiss: Seit einem (nicht genannten) Vorfall, für den sie sich die Schuld gibt, brauchen ihre Eltern Rollstühle. Ich liebe, dass Xoos Onkel, ein Abenteurer und Herumtreiber, in vielen anderen Plots Sympathieträger, große Stütze wäre. Hier aber sollen wir denken: „Trottel! Deine Nichte hat echte Imbiss-Kompetenz!“ Wie oft inszenieren sich unreife Männer als Lösung – und werden dabei zum größten Problem?

Widerborstige Figuren. Viele offene Fragen. Ich freue mich auf Band 2. Doch wie meist im Segment „Middle Grade“, 8 bis 12, bleibt mir vieles hier zu abgespeckt, geschmacksneutral.

.

.


19. Joe Shuster: Der Vater der Superhelden

Autor: Julian Voloj, Zeichner: Thomas Campi

Super Genius, 2018. Deutsch bei Carlsen.

180 Seiten, abgeschlossen.

.

.

1938, mit Mitte 20, verkaufen Autor Jerry Siegel und Zeichner Joe Shuster, Freunde aus Cleveland, ihre Figur Superman an DC Comics – und schaffen damit das Superhelden-Genre. Was die neuen Helden über New York, den Zweiten Weltkrieg, jüdische Kultur erzählen, wie Superman zeit- und ideengeschichtlich wirkt, klärt Michael Chabons grandioser 600-Seiten-Roman „Kavalier & Clay“ (2000). Doch die bitteren persönlichen Folgen für Zeichner Shuster zeigt erst diese (oft etwas trockene) Comic-Biografie, die unter anderem auf Briefen und juristischen Dokumenten fußt. Wieso verdienten Siegel und Shuster kaum an Supermans Erfolg? Wie ließen Medienkonzerne und Verlage ganze Generationen Kreativer im Regen stehen – noch in den 90er- und Nuller-Jahren?

Die eleganten, hellen Zeichnungen erinnern an die späten 50er und „Mad Men“: War der Midcentury-Modern-Stil schon 1938 so präsent – in den Büros von Groschenheft-Verlagen? Nah kommt der Doku-Comic leider weder der Person Shuster noch seinen Figuren. Es bleibt beim „Wie gewonnen, so zeronnen“-Lehrstück ohne viel Charaktertiefe oder Psychologie. Doch Sätze wie „Bill Finger, Jack Kirby, Alan Moore wurden von Verlagen schlimm über den Tisch gezogen“ lese ich als Fan fast täglich. Hier endlich: die faktensatte, plastische Ausarbeitung eines solchen Falls.

Warmherzig, respektvoll, professionell: ein Urheberrechtsstreit, der noch 80 Jahre später Folgen hat. Wer 180 Seiten lang über Freiberufler-Elend lesen will…? Stilvoller, griffiger lässt sich ein derart trockener Stoff schwer inszenieren!

.

.


18. Infidel

Autor: Pornsak Pichetshote, Zeichner: Aaron Campbell

Image Comics, März bis Juli 2018.

5 Hefte/ein Sammelband, abgeschlossen.

.

.

Horror lebt von Furcht… und Identifikation. Doch jede Gruppe hat eigene, spezifische Ängste. Pornsak Pichetshote war Redakteur und Lektor bei Vertigo Comics. Im Debüt als Autor zeigt er Rassismus, Grusel, Ausgrenzung, Monster und institutionelle Gewalt: Aisha ist Muslima und lebt mit Mann und Kind im Apartment der christlichen Schwiegermutter. Als sie im Traum – und bald auch im Gebäude – Monster sieht, beginnt ein nervöser Tanz um Notwehr, Vorwürfe, Paranoia, Terror und Fremdenfeindlichkeit, der viele Nachbarn und Aishas Freundin Medina in Dialog bringt: Wie begegnet New York People of Color, seit dem 11. September? Wie leiden US-Bürger, die ständig misstrauisch als Andere, Fremde „ge-other-ed“, ausgeschlossen werden? Welchen Mächten – politischen wie übersinnlichen – nutzt dieses „Othering„?

Die antirassistische Horror-Satire „Get Out“ gewann 2018 den Oscar fürs beste Drehbuch. Auch „Infidel“ zeigt die bürgerliche Mehrheit als größte Bedrohung: Das Monster selbst, ein Dschinn, wirkt einfallslos – und als sogar die Figuren sagen: „Nutzen wir jetzt im Ernst dieselbe Taktik wie bei ‚Ghostbusters‘?“ wird klar, dass Atmosphäre, Politisches hier mehr zählen als ein besonders origineller, schnittiger Frau-im-Mietshaus-gegen-Wesen-Plot. Es gibt zu viele und zu flache Figuren, konstruierte Wendungen. Vieles verheddert sich: Die geplante TV-Version muss besser werden!

Trotzdem: Wie vielen Frauen of Color, wie vielen Muslimas geben Comics Raum? Auch Matt Ruffs Roman „Lovecraft Country“ verknüpfte 2018 Horror und Ausgrenzung, Rassismus. Eine riesiges Feld – das hoffentlich auch Pichetshote weiter bearbeitet. Talent und Potenzial? Massig, schon hier!

.

.


17. Runaways

Autorin: Rainbow Rowell, Zeichner: meist Kris Anka

Marvel Comics, seit September 2017.

15+ Hefte in 3+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

.

.

Sechs Jugendliche sehen sich einmal im Jahr. Weil die Eltern Charity-Projekte leiten? Nein: In Wahrheit sind sie heimliche Superschurken; und gemeinsam flüchten die sechs Kinder (und ein Dinosaurier) als Helden-Clique „Runaways“ vor Familie, Behörden und Aliens quer durch die Marvel-Welt. Brian K. Vaughan („Saga“) erfand die Reihe 2004; eine TV-Serie startete 2017. Der Comic-Neustart fragt recht einsteigerfreundlich: Wie prägen Intrigen, Unterwegs-Sein, Misstrauen, Traumata eine Gruppe? Wie geht Erwachsenwerden ohne Eltern-Rückhalt? Jugendbuchautorin Rainbow Rowell lässt sich alle Zeit für Sinnsuche, „Teen Angst“, Kameraderie – tiefer, langsamer, psychologischer, witziger und oft viel origineller als andere Marvel-Reihen. Meist hängen die Ausreißer lustlos auf dem Sofa. Besonders im schlaffen Band 2: viel unnötiges Jammern, Schmollen.

Junge Helden-Teams („Young Avengers“, „Teen Titans“, aktuell die schmissigen „West Coast Avengers“) wollen Jugendlichkeit, Jungsein oft feiern, loben. „Runaways“ zeigt vor allem, wie naiv, schlecht ausgebildet, misstrauisch und aus der Zeit gefallen die „Runaways“-Notgemeinschaft mit den Jahren wird: In ständiger Todesangst fasst man selten schärfste Gedanken. Oder lernt, gesunde Beziehungen zu führen. Der Comic wird zum Sammelbecken für beschädigte Figuren – und zur Einladung an beschädigte Leser*innen: voller Wortwitz und Sarkasmus.

Ob Rowell hier nur seufzen will: „Erwachsenwerden heißt oft: ein Schritt vor, zwei Schritte zurück“ oder ob die panische Ersatzfamilie bald endlich raus, los, weiter kommt, werden erst folgende Bände zeigen. Bisher machen alle sechs Runaways vor allem (lesenswert dramatische!) Fehler.

.

.


16. Ice Cream Man

Autor: W. Maxwell Prince, Zeichner: Martin Morazzo.

Image Comics, seit Januar 2018.

8+ Hefte in 2+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

.

.

„Geschichten aus der Schattenwelt“ (1984), „American Gothic“ (1995), Stephen Kings Novellen: US-Horror bleibt oft putzig moralisch, reaktionär. Naive Lehrstücke mit Lektionen wie „Hochmut kommt vor dem Fall“, die ich mit 12, 13, 14 erwachsen fand. „Ice Cream Man“ erzählt in jedem Heft eine solche Grusel-Kurzgeschichte – abgedroschen, abgeschlossen. Belohnt werden meist die selben biederen Normen, auf die Grimms Märchen weisen: Die Dicken sterben an Völlerei. Jeder kriegt seine Rechnung. So schnell kann’s gehen, ja ja. Dass „Ice Cream Man“ trotzdem viel bösen Spaß macht, liegt an den trashigen Zeichnungen von Martin Morazzo. Den abwechslungsreichen (doch immer abgeschmackten) Plots und Twists. Und einer Mythologie, die sich nur langsam zeigt: Wer ist der Mephisto-artige Eisverkäufer mit starrem Lächeln und buntem Kühlwagen?

Kluge Horror-Comics wie „Harrow County“, „Locke & Key“ folgen unvergesslichen Figuren. Doch weil in „Ice Cream Man“ alle Opfer, Fast-Opfer, Doch-nicht-Opfer und Täter-statt-Opfer nach 20 Seiten eh bestraft, entsorgt, vergessen sind, lese ich hier keine „Schicksale“. Sondern Goldmarie-und-Pechmarie-, Die-Guten-ins-Töpfchen-die-Schlechten-ins-Kröpfchen-Gedankenspiele: Wer wird belohnt? Wer hat Gewalt und Strafe, die plötzlich in den Alltag brechen, „verdient“; wer nicht? Was sind die aktuellen Feindbilder, Prügelknaben, „acceptable targets“ im US-Horror: Um wen ist es „nicht schade“?

Ein autoritäres Weltbild. Straf- und Rachefantasien. Das genuin Gruselige an biederen US-Comics? Wessen Tode uns befriedigen, freuen sollen.

.

.


15. Incognegro & Incognegro: Renaissance

Autor: Mat Johnson, Zeichner: Warren Pleece

Vertigo/DC Comics (Incognegro: 2008) und Berger Books/Dark Horse Comics (Renaissance: 2018)

Zwei abgeschlossene Geschichten mit je ca. 120 Seiten, beides erst in je 5 Heften erschienen, dann als Sammelband.

.

.

Zwei Krimis, durch und durch: Wer „Incognegro“ und die Vorgeschichte „Incognegro: Renaissance“ als Historien- und Dokumentar-Comic über Rassismus in den 1920er Jahren liest, behält Lücken. Zu lustvoll, melodramatisch, konstruiert dreht sich hier alles um Verdächtige, falsche Fährten und den Kampf des sarkastischen Journalisten Zane Pinchback gegen Lug, Trug, Vorurteile: Genre-Kost, pointiert und überzeichnet. Autor Mat Johnson wird oft für einen Weißen gehalten; und schon 1929 schrieb die Harlem-Renaissance-Autorin Nella Lawson im Roman „Passing“ über die Preise, die hellhäutige Schwarze zahlen, sobald sie öffentlich als Weiße auftreten. Im (passablen) „Incognegro: Renaissance“ hilft Zane einer schwarzen Aufsteigerin, deren „Passing“ in der Film- und Literaturszene Erpressungen provoziert.

Im (besseren, doch oft leichtfertig brutalen) „Incognegro“ nutzt Pinchback sein eigenes „Passing“, um in die Südstaaten zu reisen und als vermeintlich weißer Reporter Bürger bloßzustellen, die Lynchmorde bejubeln. Ich lernte zwar einiges über Segregation, Jim-Crow-Gesetze, Justiz- und Unterdrückungsmechanismen seit dem US-Bürgerkrieg… doch hätte lieber einen seriöseren Sachcomic über White Supremacy als dieses schmissige, überkonstruierte, an vielen bedrückenden Stellen plötzlich action- und plotversessene Katz-und-Maus-Spiel.

Flotte Sprüche, böse Wendungen, coole Helden: Als Unterhaltung mit großem Herz und emanzipatorischem Anliegen machen beide Bände Vieles viel, viel richtiger als andere Krimis. Als Lehrstücke zu Rassismus und Lynchmorden bleiben sie zu grell, oberflächlich.

.

.


14. Crowded

Autor: Christopher Sebela, Zeichner*in: Ro Stein

Image Comics, seit August 2018.

4+ Hefte; alle 6 Hefte erscheint ein Sammelband: wird fortgesetzt.

.

.

Frauen mit Abgründen, Defekten, gehetzt durch eine bitterböse Welt. 2014, in Christopher Sebelas Himalaya-Thriller „High Crimes“, verfranste sich eine drogensüchtige Bergführerin in Schluchten und Selbsthass. „Crowded“ (Arbeitstitel: „Crowdfundead“) folgt zwei störrischen, verschlossenen Frauen – ebenfalls auf der Flucht vor Killern: Die eitle Charlie hält sich via „Gig Economy“ über Wasser: Über Apps kann man ihr Auto, Bett oder ihre Zeit als zum Beispiel Dogwalkerin buchen. Als immer mehr Passanten plötzlich versuchen, sie zu töten, wird klar: Bekannte, „Freunde“, Familie sammelten Kopfgeld, online, oft anonym. Wer Charlie tötet, erhält eine Million Dollar. Solche Mordkampagnen liefen bislang vor allem für Politiker. Vida, Personenschützerin mit schlechter Online-Wertung, muss wissen: Was tat Charlie (aufmüpfig, unzuverlässig), um so gehasst zu werden?

2015 überzeugte der Social-Media-Satire-Comic „Prez“. „Crowded“ zeigt im selben bitter-überdrehten Ton, wie Frauen unter Wertungs-Terror, Shitstorms, dauernder Verfügbarkeit, Kapitalismus leiden. Die Streits zwischen Vida (lesbisch, wortkarg, mürrisch, pragmatisch) und Charlie (egoman wie Lena Dunham in „Girls“ oder Bryan Lee O’Malleys fiese Influencerin „Snotgirl“) haben Biss, und nach fünf Heften bin ich froh, dass Sebela noch weitere Kapitel, Sammelbände plant. Eine sarkastische Reihe – doch niemals zynisch, plump technik- oder menschenfeindlich.

Eine Welt, die sofort jeden abstraft, der laut ist oder irritiert: „Crowded“ ist kritisch wie „Black Mirror“ – doch hat mehr Farbe, Tempo, Wortwitz. Lässt sich das über 12 oder 18 Hefte hinweg halten?

.

.


13. Unerschrocken: 15 Porträts außergewöhnlicher Frauen (2 Bände, je 15 Porträts)

Autorin und Zeichnerin: Penelope Bagieu

Gallimard, 2016 und 2017. Deutsch bei Reprodukt, 2017 und 18.144 Seiten (Band 1), 168 Seiten (Band 2), abgeschlossen.

.

.

Kaum Bildfolgen, Sequenzen. Keine Sprechblasen. Immer jeweils nur ein Frauenleben, erzählt auf fünf bis sieben Seiten, mit sechs bis neun Bildern pro Seite – oben immer Fließ-, Erklärtext, darunter eine simple Illustration. Als Fazit jeweils noch eine vielfarbige, prächtige Doppelseite, die jede Frau in ihrem Element, ihrer Lebenswelt feiert. „Unerschrocken“ begann als grafische Erklär-Kolumne auf der Website von Le Monde Diplomatique: Bagieu stellt Pionierinnen vor wie Mae Jemison – die erste schwarze Frau im All –, Agnodyce – Gynäkologin im antiken Athen – oder Christine Jorgensen, trans Frau und Star ab 1953. Fast jede Geschichte endet als Triumph: „Unerschrocken“ inspiriert, beflügelt, macht Mut. Viele dunkle Momente, Rückschläge und einige z.B. blutrünstige Kaiserinnen, Kriegsherrinnen, Partisaninnen sorgen für Abwechslung.

Ich zögere, die (leider auf glanzlosem, recht gelbstichig-trübem Papier gedruckten) Bände „Comics“ zu nennen: Präzise, endlos interessante Erklär-Textchen und -Bildchen, schwungvoll gezeichnet, über Frauen, die jedes Kind kennen sollte. Bekannt sind u.a. die Forscherin, Tierrechts-Aktivistin und Autistin Temple Grandin. Die lesbische Autorin Tove Jansson, Erfinderin der „Mumins“. Oder Kunstsammlerin Peggy Guggenheim – über deren Kämpfe, Konflikte ich bisher nichts wusste. Bitte unbedingt googeln: Sonita Alizadeh. Jesselyn Radack. Leymah Gbowee.

Absurd, welche Vorurteile, Hürden, welches Unrecht Frauen vor 200 Jahren ausgrenzte, bremste. Oder vor 70 Jahren. Oder heute!

.


12. Days of Hate

Autor: Ales Kot, Zeichner: Danijel Zezelj

Image Comics, Januar 2018 bis Januar 2019.

12 Hefte in 2 Sammelbänden, davon 11 bereits erschienen; danach abgeschlossen.

.

.

„Solche Comics sind Hilferufe: Der Autor braucht Therapie“, spottet ein Nicht-Fan über „Days of Hate“. Ich las bisher alle Reihen von Ales Kot. Sie wirkten hochpolitisch, ambitioniert, voll literarischer Bezüge, doch dabei freudlos, nihilistisch: rechthaberische Polit- und Politikverdrossenheits-Essays, erzählt als tiefgraue Comic-Thriller. „Days of Hate“ zeigt ein Ex-Liebespaar in einem dystopischen Amerika, 2022. Amanda führt Krieg gegen die Regierung. Huan, ihre Exfrau, hilft dem Geheimdienst, Amanda zu stellen. Sind die Frauen echte Gegnerinnen? Woran scheiterte die Ehe? Was erhofft sich Huan in rassistischen Verhören? Wie konnten Trumps Diskursverschiebungen die USA in vier kurzen Jahren ruinieren?

False Flags, Fake News, White Supremacy: Nach jedem Kapitel gibt Kot machtkritische Buch-, Essay- und Musiktipps. Der drückende Zeichenstil, die vielen Schatten, die schon in ähnlich hoffnungslosen, tollen Polit-Reihen wie „DMZ“ und „The Massive“ überzeugten, passen zum erwachsenen, doch oft belehrenden Ton. Zwei verletzte, hoch gebildete Frauen und mehrere Unterdrücker, Agenten debattieren wie in Sartres „Geschlossene Gesellschaft“. Das Weltbild (und den Insider-Jargon) kenne ich aus Oliver Stones Verschwörungsthrillern der 90er.

Vor 25 Jahren fragten Linke der Generation X, was Widerstand bedeutet. Ales Kot (32, Generation Y) stellt die selben Fragen, im selben Look. Kritik an der Brave New World, im Ton der guten alten (90er-)Zeit.

.

.


11. Mr. Miracle

Autor: Tom King, Zeichner: Mitch Gerads

DC Comics, August 2017 bis November 2018.

12 Hefte in 2 Sammelbänden, abgeschlossen.

.

.

Vor einem Jahr, nach fünf (von zwölf) Heften/Kapiteln, stürmte „Mister Miracle“ viele Beste-Comics-2017-Listen als clever-wirres Weltraum-Rätsel. Ich bleibe unsicher, wie klug der toll gezeichnete und inszenierte Comic wirklich von Gehirnwäsche, Palastintrigen, „Mindfucks“ unter Höllengöttern erzählt: Despot Darkseid knechtet den Fabrik-Planeten Apokolips. Im Krieg gegen das aseptische New Genesis wird Frieden erst möglich, indem Darkseid und Patriarchen-Gott Highfather Söhne tauschen. So wächst Scott Free in Darkseids Folterkammern auf, verliebt sich in die „Female Fury“ Big Barda und flüchtet als Entfesslungskünstler „Mister Miracle“ zur Erde – alles erzählt ab 1971, in Jack Kirbys „New Gods“-Comics. Barda und Scott leben als junges, traumatisiertes Paar in LA. Ist seine Kindheit Gund für Scotts plötzlichen Suizidversch? Steckt Darkseid dahinter?

In vielen Mainstream-Comics ist das Power-Couple Scott und Barda Teil der Justice League. Für Autor Michael Chabon war Barda (dominant, souverän, wuchtiger als ihr Partner) eine prägende Sehnsuchts-Frau. Trotz Jack Kirbys pompöser, fast biblischer Mythologie sind die Eheleute zugänglich, plausibel, sympathisch. Nach 12 Ausgaben Geraune, Rätsel, Andeutungen, bleibt von „Mister Miracle“ kein (richtig stimmiger) Brainfuck-Plot: King ging es offenbar viel mehr um (oft: profane) Widersprüchlichkeiten einer modernen Partnerschaft ab 30 – skurril verfremdet.

Götter und Ausklapp-Sofas: „Mister Miracle“ fragt, wie Menschen die Verletzungen ihrer Kindheit in die Ehe tragen – und sie überwinden. Als Autor von „Batman“ liebt Tom King Halbgares, Stream-of-Consciousness-Gestammel. Auch hier bleibt vieles offen. Doch Scott und Barda rühren, leuchten!

.

.


10. Shimanami Tasogare

geschrieben und gezeichnet trans Zeichner*x Yuhki Kamatani

Shogakukan, März 2015 bis Mai 2018.

21 Kapitel in vier Sammelbänden, abgeschlossen.

.

.

Eine marode Kleinstadt am Meer. Eine Teestube als sanfter Rückzugsort: Safe Space. Und Tasuku, etwa 15 Jahre alt, der jedes Wochenende mit den neuen Lounge-Bekannten verlassene Häuser renoviert, bezahlt mit staatlichen Fördermitteln: Yuhki Kamatani sagt nicht, welches Geschlecht sie oder er hat – nur, dass ihm oder ihr als Kind das falsche Geschlecht zugewiesen wurde. Ihr oder sein Manga zeigt unter anderem eine nonbinary Figur, die weder „er“ noch „sie“ genannt werden will (und asexuell ist). Einen Crossdresser, etwa 12, der Mädchenhaftes liebt. Ein lesbisches Paar, das heiraten will. Und den älteren Tchaiko, dessen Lebenspartner im Sterben liegt. Alle Figuren fragen in ruhigen, klugen Gesprächen: Wie hängen Begehren, Queerness, Selbstverständnis und Identität zusammen?

Fast alle „Boy’s Love“-Mangas führen klischeehafte Männer-Paare für Hetero-Fans vor: sexistische Klischees wie „Der starke, größere Partner penetriert den zarten, weibischen“. Mit jenem Kitsch-und-Klischee-Erotik-Genre hat „Shimanami Tasogare“ nichts zu tun. Ein respektvolles Erklär- und Alltags-Drama ohne Exotisierung. Nur der Abschluss des auf Deutsch noch nicht erhältlichen Geheimtipps kommt viel zu abrupt: Ich hätte gern noch jahrelang verfolgt, wie sich die respektvollen Figuren gegenseitig fördern, stützen und herausfordern.

Je mehr wir über Identitäten, Sexualitäten sprechen, desto klarer wird, dass wir noch viel, viel mehr erklären und verstehen müssen. Erklär-Mangas geben bei vielen Themen Hilfestellung. Hier fließt alles so klug, entspannt, präzise – das muss in (Schul-)Bibliotheken!

.

.


09. Der Umfall

Autor und Zeichner: Mikael Ross

Avant Verlag, 2018.

128 Seiten, abgeschlossen.

.

.

Eine evangelische Stiftung in Niedersachsen, das inklusive Dorf Neuerkerode, gibt einen Promo- und PR-Comic in Auftrag (uff!). Ein Cartoonist, der Körper gern cartoon- und lachhaft überzeichnet, zeigt Figuren mit Behinderung (hmpf!). Hauptfigur Noel, herzig, pummelig, Anfang 20, muss zur betreuten Wohngruppe aufs platte Land, weil die Mutter einen „Umfall“ hatte, leblos im Bad lag… doch plant den wilden Roadtrip heim nach Berlin (oje!). „Mutig“ sind die kurzen, oft tragikomischen Anekdoten aus dem Heim-Alltag nicht, weil Künstler Mikael Ross Neues ausprobiert, sondern, weil er überraschend warmherzig, souverän, respektvoll zeigt, dass auch auf ausgetretenen Pfaden Raum ist für Figuren mit Behinderung, würde- und humorvoll porträtiert. Furchtbar gut gemeint. Doch, Überraschung: tatsächlich auch furchtbar gut gemacht!

Ein Spielfilm über das Dorf (und unter anderem die T4-Morde bis 1945) wäre schnell verkitscht, artifiziell. Als Roman bräuchten Ross‘ Nuancen, Ambivalenzen viel mehr Umschreibung. Und eine TV-Doku wirkt schon nach drei, vier Jahren gestrig. „Der Umfall“ gelingt – doch wiederholt ein Muster: Hauptfiguren mit geistiger Behinderung erleben oft größte Schläge. Hören immerzu, wie viel sie nicht dürfen, können, niemals erreichen. Dann weinen sie, schlagen kurz über die Stränge, und ein bittersüßes Ende zeigt: Das Leben geht weiter.

Wie Menschen, alert genug, um zu verstehen, dass ihnen dauernd Teilhabe, Normalität verweigert wird, mit dieser Dauer-Frustration umgehen, ohne, zu verbittern oder täglich zu platzen? Das fragt der immens lesenswerte Comic zwar. Eine Antwort hat das bittersüße Klischee-Ende nicht.

.

.


08. Saga

Autor: Brian K. Vaughan, Zeichnerin: Fiona Staples

Image Comics, seit März 2012.

54+ Hefte in 9+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

.

.

Ein Ehepaar, ihre Tochter und viele (oft wechselnde oder sterbende) Verbündete auf der Flucht – gejagt von Kopfgeldjäger*innen, Geheimdiensten und den Heeren zweier Mächte: Alana war Soldatin der Landfall-Allianz. Marko stammt vom Mond Wreath. Ihr Kind Hazel gilt als biologische Unmöglichkeit, und seit 2012 erzählten 54 Hefte/Kapitel von Gewalt, Familie (und Wahlfamilien, Solidarität), dem Glück (und manchmal Trauma), Eltern zu sein und dem Trauma (und manchmal Glück), Kind zu sein. Jedes Heft überrumpelt auf Seite 1 mit absurden neuen Settings und Figuren. Jedes Heft endet mit einem „Da staunt ihr!“-Twist. Brian K. Vaughan benutzt immer gleiche, oft eitle Kunstgriffe: Gefühlsachterbahnen. Dramatic Irony. Überraschender Verrat. Überraschende Versöhnung. So toll Fiona Staples‘ Gestalten und Design sind: „Saga“ wirkt sehr kalkuliert.

Toll darum, dass nach neun Sammelbänden (und etwa der Hälfte der geplanten Geschichte) ein radikaler Einschnitt zeigt: Vieles, das in den letzten Jahren geschah, kann nach 2018 unmöglich weiter aufgekocht, variiert werden. Die Karten liegen plötzlich anders.

„Saga“ ist verlässlich einer der anspruchsvollsten, (verkrampft) originellsten und mainstream-tauglichsten Erwachsenencomics, Jahr für Jahr. Mit Band 9 beweist Vaughan, dass er keine Masche, kein Strickmuster perfektioniert – sondern sich Anfang, Mitte und (in fünf Jahren?) Ende deutlich unterscheiden. Was in Band 6, 7, 8 mitunter wie Leerlauf, Wassertreten wirkte, liegt jetzt in einem neuen Licht. Ein guter Punkt, um einzusteigen!

.

.


07. Go Go Power Rangers

Autor: Ryan Parrott, Zeichner: Dan Mora; später Eleonora Carlini

Boom! Studios, seit Juli 2017.

14+ Hefte in 3+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

.

.

Alien Zordon leiht fünf Teenagern aus Angel Grove, Kalifornien, Kräfte (und Dinosaurier-Roboter), um eine böse Hexe auf dem Mond zu stoppen: Rita Repulsa. Die billige TV-Serie ab 1993 – als Rahmenhandlung: fade US-Teens im Jugendzentrum; dazwischen Monster-Kämpfe, aus der japanischen „Super Sentai“-Reihe importiert – zeigte mir damals nur, dass ich mit 11, 12 fadem Kinder-TV entwuchs. Ein 25 Jahre altes Trash-Franchise, für das mir jede Nostalgie, fast alle Kenntnisse fehlen. Doch eine Menge aktueller US-Comics (besonders bei Dark Horse, IDW und Boom) setzen Kinder- oder 90er-Erfolge komplexer, erwachsener neu fort: 2018 erhielten unter anderem neue Comics zu „Turtles“, „Transformers“, „Xena“, „Der dunkle Kristall“ exzellente Kritiken.

„Go Go Power Rangers“ gibt fünf, sechs Hauptfiguren viel Zeit: Die Reihe spielt kurz nach Folge 1 der Serie. Die Teenager hadern mit ihren Rollen, Kräften und Geheimnissen. Dass alle sprechen wie 2018, und nur ihr Jugendzentrum aussieht wie 1993? Dass ich nicht weiß, was aus Zordon oder Rita wird? Und dass ein anderer, paralleler Comic, Kyle Higgins‘ „Power Rangers“, noch mehr (viel kompliziertere) Zusatz- und Drumherum-Geschichten erzählt? Egal! Kein Fan- und Vorwissen sind nötig: Alles erklärt sich zwanglos und elegant nebenbei.

Ein Comic, an dem alles schreit „zweitrangig, nebensächlich“ beweist, dass auch fadenscheinige, lieblose Konzepte strahlen können – sobald Figuren Raum kriegen für Witz, Ideen, Verletzlichkeit.

.

.


06. Girlsplaining; Der Ursprung der Welt; Der Ursprung der Liebe

Katja Klengel (Autorin und Zeichnerin), Reprodukt Verlag.

160 Seiten, 2018. („Girlsplaining“)

Liv Strömquist (Autorin und Zeichnerin), Avant Verlag.

(„Welt“: 140 Seiten, 2017. „Liebe“: 136 Seiten, 2018.)

.

.

Eine Kulturgeschichte der Vulva: Wie deuteten, straften, stigmatisierten Männer weibliche Lust, Menstruation, den Körper? („Der Ursprung der Welt“) Und eine Kulturgeschichte der Idee, dass Frauen besondere Erfüllung finden, indem sie sich einem Partner unterwerfen („Der Ursprung der Liebe“: straffer, pointierter, doch etwas flacher). Feministin und Kulturwissenschaftlerin Liv Strömquist spricht in zwei Schwarzweiß-Erklär-Comics mit oft polemischem, überlangem Text und meist arg simplen, bewusst dilettantischen Zeichnungen im Punk- und Fanzine-Look über Statistiken, Denkfehler, kollektive Urteile. Bücher, die jeder Mensch ab 13 mit Gewinn lesen wird. Kurz nerven die Krakelschrift, die Textwüsten, der plump rotzige Jargon. Zu oft sind Strömquists Montagen so einladend, ansehnlich wie PowerPoint. Trotzdem: ein Muss!

Kürzer, witziger erklärt Katja Klengel, geboren 1988 in Jena, wie starke Frauenfiguren wie Sailor Moon, Buffy, Prinzessin Fantaghirò sie in den 90ern inspirierten. Wie „Sex & the City“ sie hingegegen hemmte und frustrierte. Das Stigma Körperbehaarung. Rosarotes Mädchen-Spielzeug. Die Standard-Themen feministischer Kolumnen – super-liebevoll und -gewitzt illustriert. Kein Buch stimmte mich 2018 fröhlicher: Ein fast perfekter Verschenk- und Einstiegs-Tipp, zugänglich, sympathisch!

Als Texte ohne Bilder wäre Strömquist recht glanzlos, trocken – und Klengel viel zu karg. Erst all die albernen, verspielten Illustrationen schaffen Sog und Ausgleich: Feministische Essays, die einladen, Welt neu und kritischer zu sehen.

.

.


05. Eine Schwester

Autor und Zeichner: Bastien Vivès

Casterman, 2017. Deutsch bei Reprodukt, 2018.

216 Seiten, abgeschlossen.

.

.

Geht das nur in Frankreich – als eleganter Comic, der nur die nötigsten Umrisse zeigt? Oft sogar Blick und Augen der Figuren ausspart? Antoine ist 13, zeichnet Pokémon und schlägt mit seiner jüngeren Schwester am Strand und im Ferienhaus Zeit tot. Dann wird die 16-jährige Hélène, Tochter einer Freundin der Eltern, für ihn zur Mentorin, Vertrauten und „Schwester“. Vivès zarte, kluge Ferien-Episode wäre noch besser, würde sogar noch mehr fehlen: Das nächtliche Wettschwimmen mit melodramatischer Pointe. Die Erektion des 13-Jährigen in einer Dusch-Szene. Nicht-sehr-subtile Psychologisierungen zur Frage, was „Kind“, „Schwester“, „Zuwachs“ etc. für alle Figuren bedeuten. Originell ist nichts an dieser Geschichte – oder ihren Motiven. Manches wirkt so reißbretthaft wie eine Familienaufstellung.

Doch so, wie ich bei Vivès‘ Tanzhochschul-Comic „Polina“ (2011) noch Jahre später Räume, Körper, Choreografien erinnere und weiß: deutlicher, markanter hat mir niemand je dieses Milieu vermittelt… denke ich bei „Eine Schwester“: Respekt! Das sind Bilder und Figuren, die lange nachklingen. Für die 216 Seiten braucht man keine 30 Minuten. Alle kurzen Dialoge, spärlichen Bilder, skizzierten Zimmer, Wege, Beziehungen bleiben, nüchtern betrachtet, supervage, karg und offen. Die Kunst des Weglassens. Leerstellen, die faszinieren.

Weniger ist selten mehr. Doch selten ist so wenig… so wunderbar viel. Eine zeitlose Coming-of-Age-, Initiations-Geschichte, in der jeder Strich und jede Silbe zählen.

.

.


04. Kingdom

Autor und Zeichner: Jon McNaught

Nobrow Press, 2018.

112 Seiten, abgeschlossen.

.

.

1931 erschien R.C. Sherriffs „Septemberglück“: ein gemütvoller, stiller Roman über britische Kleinbürger mit fast erwachsenen Kindern, die zwei Wochen in einem Kurort sitzen – sobald es kühler wird und die Pension erschwinglich. Dieser Klassiker ist keine Satire über Spießer, und auch kein Versuch, oft heikle, trostlose Ferien und murksige Entscheidungen von Familien, denen Geld und Bildung fehlt, zu beschönigen. Jon McNaught, Illustrator (33), schafft die fast selbe Atmosphäre, in wenigen Farben und der flächigen Fehldruck-Optik von Risografien. Eine alleinerziehende Mutter, ihr Sohn (etwa 15 Jahre alt) und die kleine Schwester im Containerdorf am Meer. Ein totes Schaf in den Dünen. Eine Spielhalle am Rasthof. Der melancholische Besuch bei einer Tante. The seaside town that they forgot to close down…

McNaughts Illustrationen passen auf Buchcover oder zum „New Yorker“: retro, flächig – meist simple Spiele mit Licht, Schatten, Silhouetten, Negative Space. Die Puppengesichter, Knopfaugen der Figuren wirken schlicht – die Emotionen sind es nicht: Ein Buch über Schönheit, Schäbigkeit, Melancholie und kleines Glück, in dem jede Szene mit großflächigen Zeichnungen beginnt… doch bald schon kurze, leise Dialoge, Blicke, kleine Wendungen in immer engere, beklemmendere Panels stampft. Comic-Star Chris Ware erzählt ähnlich – und empfiehlt und fördert McNaught.

„Man braucht eben kaum Plot, wenn das Design überzeugt!“, denke ich beim Blättern. Und dann wieder: „Man braucht eben kein eitles, bombastisches Design – bei einem so simplen, zeitlosen, starken Plot.“ Ein Kleinod!

.

.


03. Space Brothers

Autor und Zeichner: Chuya Koyama

Kodansha, seit Ende 2007.

327+ Kapitel in 34+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

.

.

Große Männer – als kleine Geister: Wer Branchen zeigt, in denen Pathos und Elite zählen (Medizin, Sport, Politik, Militär), stellt Profis oft als Ausnahme- oder Übermenschen dar. Oder ruft besonders hämisch: „Kuckt. Die kochen nur mit Wasser!“ Ingenieur und Autodesigner Mutta, Anfang 30, steht im Schatten des jüngeren Hibito: dem ersten Japaner, der 2025 für eine NASA-Mondlandung im Gespräch ist. Mutta hat Gespür für Stimmungen, Ambivalenzen. Doch im Versuch, taktisch raffiniert aufzutreten, macht er sich oft zum Trottel. Eignungs-Verhöre, Budget-Debatten, Assessment Centers, lustvolles Improvisieren… „Space Brothers“ zeigt Druck und Ethos bei der NASA. Viel Navigieren mit Vorgesetzten und Kollegen. Und, je näher die Brüder dem All kommen: das Wissen, dass jeder Fehltritt die Karriere kosten kann – und Menschenleben.

Ein Manga für berufstätige Männer… der Frauen wenig Raum bietet. Die einfältige, plumpe Mutter. Die 15-jährige russische Tänzerin Olga, verliebt in Hibito. Ein afroamerikanischer Astronaut wird als Gorilla vermarktet – ohne, dass sich jemand am Rassismus stößt. Vieles wird nur langsam, über Jahre hinweg enthüllt oder präzisiert. Dann aber: toll kitsch-, pathos-, und patriotismusfrei. Deshalb vertraue ich auch bei Misstönen wie Olga oder dem Gorilla-Vergleich auf die Zeit: Vieles, das „Space Brothers“ nur kurz streift, wirkt halbgar, skurril. Später wird es en detail erklärt – und stimmig.

Mutta ist ein Unikat (und Tölpel). Ich liebe, diesem Mann beim Entscheiden zuzusehen – in einer akribisch recherchierten, glaubwürdigen Erzählwelt. Ingenieurskunst, Gruppendynamik, Lern- und Organisationspsychologie – statt plump gefeiertes Heldentum.

.

.


02. Drei Wege

Autorin und Zeichnerin: Julia Zeijn

Avant Verlag, 2018.

184 Seiten, abgeschlossen.

.

.

100 Jahre Frauenwahlrecht: 1918 wird Ida (18) Hausmädchen einer bürgerlichen Familie, lernt Radfahren, stellt Weichen fürs Leben. 1968 will Marlies (18) eine Ausbildung im Buchhandel – obwohl sie eh bald unter die Haube soll. 2018, nach dem Abitur, schaut Selin (18) auf ihre Mutter (Influencerin und Öko-Bloggerin) und die ambitionierte beste Freundin (Studium in den USA) – und muss abwägen, wie viel Ruhe oder Sinnsuche sie sich noch leistet. Die Bleistift-Zeichnungen, vermeintlich kindlich, strotzen vor Berlin-Details und den Spezifika historischer Milieus. Statt vieler Farben liegt nur je ein Filter über jedem Erzählstrang. Ida: blasses Gelb; Marlies: Altrosa; Selin: kühles Blau, wie LCD-Screens. In einigen Montagen, Stadtansichten stehen Filter und Zeiten wie Mosaiksteine nebeneinander: Drei Frauen radeln zu drei Zeiten durch die selbe Straße, in einem Bild.

10, 20 Seiten mehr pro Handlungsstrang – und die vielen Nebenfiguren hätten Tiefe. Mich begeistert, dass ein deutschsprachiger Comic auf Weltniveau erzählt – nicht durch gefällig kunstfertige Zeichnungen oder hochdramatische Themen. Sondern, weil Zeijn drei Frauen und ihre Welt erkennbar liebt, versteht, grandios effektiv vermittelt. Schon Barabra Yelins Comics („Irmina“, „Der Sommer ihres Lebens“) machten Spaß – wirken aber oft recht lehrstückhaft, von-oben-herab. „Die arme Frau: Opfer ihrer Zeit und Umstände!“

„Drei Wege“ ist optimistischer. Viel mehr am Individuum interessiert als am „Typus“, „Fallbeispiel“. Hätten alle Figuren so viel Tiefe, wäre das mein Buch des Jahres.

.

.


01. Vinland Saga

Autor und Zeichner: Makoto Yukimura

Kodansha, seit Juli 2005.

155+ Kapitel in 21+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

.

.

Ein brutales Wikinger-Epos – über Pazifismus: Thorfinn Karlsefni, Bauernkind auf Island, erlebt, wie sein oft nachgiebiger, konfliktscheuer Vater von Söldner-Hauptmann Askeladd betrogen wird. Thorfinn weiß nicht, wer den Mord in Auftrag gab, versteckt sich auf Askeladds Schiff und wird im Gefolge erwachsen: Askeladd verspricht, sich einem ehrenvollen Duell zu stellen, sobald sich Thorfinn als Messerstecher und Kampfmaschine bewährt. Der akribisch recherchierte, prachtvolle Historien-Manga startete 2007 in einem Magazin für Schuljungs: Kapitel 1 wirkt, als wolle es nur List und Kaltschnäuzigkeit übermenschlich schneller Super-Vikinger feiern. Doch ab Band 3 lässt der Plot keine Zweifel: Gewalt löst nichts. Alle (oft: historisch verbürgten) Figuren, die in Skandinavien und England intrigieren, kämpfen, Krieg führen, haben seelische Schäden – und tragen sie immer weiter.

Seit Band 15, als Thorfinn Vertraute findet, Verantwortung für Schwächere übernimmt, wird das Epos bunter, launiger. Trotzdem hat jeder Konflikt auf allen Seiten nur Verlierer – und kluge Perspektivwechsel und Dialoge zeigen, warum Konzepte wie „Mitleid“, „Atheismus“, „Demokratie“, „Gewaltfreiheit“ im frühen elften Jahrhundert, zur Zeit Leif Eriksons, nicht greifen: Eine Geistes- und Mentalitätsgeschichte aller Mitglieder der Ständegesellschaft. Duelle, Allianzen und Survival-Drama wie in „The Walking Dead“. Nur eben: warmherziger. Getragen von Idealen!

Mittelalter-Kitsch liebt alte Rollenbilder. Das Recht das Stärkeren. Der wohlige Grusel, dass jede tapfere Magd oder „zu stolze“ Leibeigene jederzeit „geschändet“ werden kann. „Vinland Saga“ zeigt komplexe Männer und Frauen – die in einer komplexen Welt maximal klug, moralisch handeln wollen.

.

Töchter schreiben über Väter: Mareike Nieberding, Linn Ullmann, Elizabeth Garber bei Deutschlandfunk Kultur.

.

Für Deutschlandfunk Kultur las ich drei aktuelle Bücher, in denen Töchter über ihre Väter schreiben…

…und über ihre Schwierigkeiten, mit den alternden Männern zu sprechen.

.

Morgen – Donnerstag, 21. Juni 2018 – bin ich gegen 10.15 Uhr Studiogast in der „Lesart“, für ein ca. 6-Minuten-Gespräch mit Frank Meyer.

Der Audio-Link bleibt nur sechs Monate verfügbar.

Schon heute, hier im Blog: Thesen, Kurztexte und ein paar Links zum Themenfeld.

.

Ich las:

MAREIKE NIEBERDING: „Ach, Papa. Wie mein Vater und ich wieder zueinanderfanden“ (Suhrkamp Nova, Februar 2018)

LINN ULLMANN, „Die Unruhigen. Roman (!)“ (Luchterhand, Juni 2018. Original: Norwegen 2015)

ELIZABETH GARBER, „Implosion. A Memoir of an Architect’s Daughter“ (She Writes Press, 12. Juni 2018. nicht auf Deutsch)

.

Wie sprechen Töchter mit Vätern – und wie sprechen die Bücher darüber, wie schwer es ist, als Erwachsener mit wortkargen oder emotional kalten Männern neu ins Gespräch zu kommen? Den Generationskonflikt kannten Autor*innen der 68er-Generation: linke Töchter und Söhne, die ihre vom Krieg deformierten Väter (oft: Nazis) konfrontieren. Mir geht es um sanftere, jüngere Bücher.

Ich habe viele bleischwere Tochter-Vater-Lieblingsbücher: Liane Dirks schreibt in „Vier Arten, meinen Vater zu beerdigen“ über Missbrauch und Kolonialismus; Alison Bechdel erzählt im Comic „Fun Home“ vom Selbstmord ihres schwulen oder bisexuellen Vaters; auch Miriam Toews‘ „Mr. T, der Spatz und die Sorgen der Welt“ handelt vom Selbstmord des Vaters.

Stattdessen aber suchte ich nach aktuellen Büchern/Memoirs, die kleiner, intimer, alltäglicher sind: der Vater nicht als Monster oder lebenslanger Widersacher. Sondern als jemand, den die Welt überholt. und den man später, als Tochter, neu mitnehmen und einbinden will. Alle drei Bücher werden durch ihre Alltäglichkeit relevant: Die Autorinnen sprechen viel über Subjektivität, menschliche und literarische Versuche, Poetik: statt selbstbestimmt und autoritär aufzutreten (wie ihre Väter, in der Kindheit) wissen sie, dass ihr Erzählvorhaben auch scheitern kann.

Tastende Bücher, ohne Arroganz.

Ich suchte gezielt nach Töchtern, weil hier viel erzählt wird über neue Frauenbilder, Emanzipation… und eine ratlose ältere Männer-Generation, die sich neu erfinden sollte – doch meist einfach geschockt oder frustriert schweigt, verharrt. bei Vätern und Töchtern ist außerdem klar: der Vater kann kein 1-zu-1-Role-Model sein (wie in Vater-Sohn-Büchern):

Vor 30+ Jahren bestimmten diese Väter, wie Mädchen zu sein haben. Heute liegt die Macht, Verantwortung, Agency bei den Autorinnen, die als erwachsene Frauen abwägen müssen, wie sie über den Vater schreiben: Die Macht wandert von dem, der alles finanziert, normiert, wertet… zu der, die heute erzählt, normiert, wertet. Ich mag, wie macht- und schutzlos die Töchter sind, als Figuren, in der Kindheit… doch dass sie als Autor*innen ja ALLE Macht und Deutungshoheit über ihre Väter haben. Ich mag, dass alle Töchter versuchen, ihren Vätern etwas anzubieten, zurückzugeben etc.: „Du hast mir meine Kinderwelt gebaut. Jetzt bin ich erwachsen und nehme dich in meine… erwachsene, ganz eigene Welt mit.“ Spannend / dramatisch, wie schwer das ist – und wie vergeblich oft.

Die Bücher sind reizvoll, weil sie alltäglich, intim sind – und ich vieles gut mit der eigenen Familie/Kindheit abgleichen kann. Thema ist: Mein Vater baut mir eine Welt. an der ich mich reibe – und aus der ich raus wachse. Keiner der Väter in den Büchern meint es böse. Interessant, wie gesagt: wie Väter transportieren, wie Mädchen (später: Frauen) zu sein haben, was sich ziemt, wo sie sich in der Tochter sehen und, wo sie sich nicht sehen, weil sie verschiedene Geschlechter haben. Der Vater als Versorger, Richter, Autorität.

In Jugendbüchern kommt das kaum vor: Dort sind die Held*innen oft Waisen oder auf sich allein gestellt. Harper Lees „To kill a Mockingbird“ zeigt ein wunderbares, doch sehr idealisiertes Tochter-Vater-Gespann. Und, Überraschung: „Go set a Watchman“, Lees zuvor entstandenes, dunkleres, bittereres Buch, passt wunderbar in diese Memoir- und Nonfiction-Reihe über ambivalente, normierende Väter… und die Tochter, die da raus wächst.

.

.

Mareike Nieberdings „Ach, Papa“ war ursprünglich für den Herbst 2017 angekündigt – unter dem Titel „Als wir das Reden vergaßen“.

Mein Vater wurde im Sommer 2016 60 – und wünschte sich von allen Gästen der Feier persönliche Texte. Doch weil er selbst so wenig Persönliches erzählt, schrieb ich eine Liste mit 200 Fragen (Link). Von Nieberding, einer ZEIT-Journalistin, vier Jahre jünger als ich (*1987) erhoffte ich mir einen recht persönlichen, vielleicht symptomatisierenden Blick auf diese Generation deutscher Väter/Männer:.

Doch „Ach, Papa“ kriegte, zusammen mit dem neuen Titel, ein zartrosa Cover – und vermittelt eher Landkindheits-, Wohlfühl-, Sehnsucht-nach-Zuhause-Atmosphäre.

Nieberdings Vater (stolz, stoisch, freundlich, warm, brummig) studierte in Freiburg und lebt mit der Familie bei Oldenburg. Nieberding zieht nach Berlin, doch kehrt für einen Tochter-Vater-Roadtrip bis nach Freiburg zurück. Unterwegs spricht sie über Lebensentwürfe, Träume, Heimat, Geborgenheit, Familienkonzepte. Ihr Vater sagt recht wenig – klingt vernünftig, aber bleibt, als Figur, stoisch und blass. Die beiden mögen sich: auf der Buchpremiere im Januar stand der Vater stolz, mit feuchtem Blick im Publikum.

Doch mich enttäuschte das Buch. Ich verstehe, dass man bei einem noch lebendem Vater nicht jeden Widerspruch, Konflikt ausbreiten will – und ich verstehe, dass ein gelungenes Tochter-Vater-Buch kein großes Trauma braucht: Ein undramatischer 190-Seiten-Text über einen etwas knorrigen Papa? Passt. Nur war hier, bei beiden Generationen, viel zu viel Scheu: Ein Vater, der seine Tochter fast nichts fragt, nicht wertet, wenig will, tut, ausspricht. Und eine Tochter, die auf 190 Seiten jeden Abgrund, jede harte Frage umgeht:

Ein übervorsichtiges, lauwarmes, defensives Buch – in dem niemand unsympathisch oder schwierig ist, doch bei dem ich mich trotzdem unangenehm berührt fühlte: Weil zwei Menschen, denen es offenbar nicht viel gibt, sich öffentlich zueinander zu positionieren… in der Öffentlichkeit stehen, nervös, befangen und norddeutsch-schmallippig.

Zwei Amazon-Statements, denen ich zustimme:

„Ich selbst gehöre einer ganz anderen Generation an und vielleicht ist das der Grund, warum ich mich immer wieder fragte „was will sie denn, sie hat doch ein tolles Verhältnis zu ihrem Vater“. Tatsächlich fand ich Mareikes Problem eher als Luxusproblem und ich hätte nicht von Entfremdung gesprochen. Was mir dieses Buch aver gegeben hat, war der Denkanstoß mich mit meinem eigenen Vater und seiner Vergangenheit zu beschäftigen, so intensiv, wie ich es vielleicht noch nie gemacht habe.“

„Um sich ihrem Vater anzunähern, schickt Nieberding ihm zum einen E-Mail-Fragebögen und unternimmt mit ihm außerdem einen Kurzurlaub in den Schwarzwald. Diese Passagen handelt von zweien, die keine Übung mehr darin haben, miteinander alleine zu sein. Allerdings kam mir Mareike Nieberdings Erkenntnis dann wenig spektakulär vor: „Auch ich hätte fragen können – und ebenso gut hätte ich auch einfach mal erzählen können.“ Stimmt – statt immer nur zu warten, dass ihr tiefschürfende Fragen gestellt werden. Ohnehin blieb bei mir der Eindruck zurück, den Vater trotz aller privaten Details zu wenig kennengelernt zu haben – wie steht er denn eigentlich zu der Entfremdung? Hat die Autorin ihn das eigentlich gefragt?

Als öffentliche Aufarbeitung ihrer eigenen Vater-Tochter-Beziehung hat Mareike Nieberding natürlich sowohl alle Freiheiten als auch die Deutungshoheit. Angekündigt wurde das Buch allerdings auch damit, dass es erzählen würde „[…] wie man sich wieder nahekommt, wenn man sich schon fast verloren hat.“ Das mag auf die Autorin und ihren Vater zutreffen, aber aus „Ach, Papa“ lässt sich nur wenig allgemein ableiten.“

Ich will das Buch nicht als Neon-Journalismus etc. aussortieren. Doch tatsächlich las auch ich nur deshalb mit Gewinn weiter, weil ich bei jeder Aussage an meinen eigenen Vater denken musste. Und wusste: ich wäre beherzter, konfrontativer, lauter als Niebderding.

.

Linn Ullmanns „Die Unruhigen“ erzählt auf 410 Seiten von einem gescheiterten journalistischen, psychologischen, künstlerischen Projekt:

Als ihr Vater mit Anfang 80 erste Demenzerscheinungen zeigt, kauft Ullmann ein Diktiergerät, zieht in ein Haus nahe des Vater-Hauses auf der Insel Farö und verabredet sich mit ihm ein Frühjahr lang (2007) zu je zwei Stunden langen Interviews: Sie stellt Fragen – und gemeinsam wollen sie ein Buch über ihr Verhältnis – und sein Vermächtnis als Theater- und Filmregisseur – erarbeiten: diszipliniert, reflektiert, nüchtern.

Tatsächlich schätzte Ullmann ihren Vater falsch ein: Die Demenz ist weit fortgeschritten; die sechs Gespräche sind voller non sequiturs, ihr Vater fühlt sich hörbar unwohl. Sie bricht das Projekt ab – und beschließt Jahre später, einen Roman über ihre Kindheitssommer auf der Insel zu schreiben: Sie verbringt je einen Monat im Jahr bei ihm, lebt sonst bei ihrer Mutter, einer nervösen und einsamen Schauspielerin, in u.a. Amerika. Ullmanns Vater hat insgesamt neun Kinder, fünf Exfrauen, vier Häuser etc.

„Die Unruhigen“, ein Roman, vermischt Gesprächsprotokolle, skandinavischen Kindheits-Erinnerungs-Glanz im Stil von u.a. Tove Janssons „Sommerbuch“ (Empfehlung!), geschwätzige, detailversessene, oft viel zu lange Autofiktion wie bei Knausgard und viele, viele Reflektionen über die Natur des Erinnerns (u.a. mit massig Verweisen auf Proust): Ullmann findet die Tonaufnahmen ca. 2011 wieder – und montiert ein Erinnerungsbuch über die Unfähigkeit, ein kohärentes Erinnerungsbuch zu schreiben.

Mir wurde erst nach ca. 100 Seiten klar, dass Ullmann die Tochter von Ingmar Bergmann und Liv Ullmann ist: Das Buch ist auch ohne diese Promi-Ebene packend, übervoll. Einzelne Szenen dauern zu lang, oft sagt Ullmann die selben Dinge auf fünf verschiedene Arten: Das Buch wirkt zerquälter und schwerfälliger, als es sein müsste (insgesamt ist es weder besonders anklagend, noch deprimierend):

Eine sehr analytische Tochter zeichnet in teils ermüdenden, doch immer psychologischen, reifen, klugen Details, wie klein die Rolle war, die ihr im Leben des Regisseurs, Bestimmers, Pedanten zugeteilt wurde – und, wie schwer es oft war, sich selbst zu disziplinieren, anzupassen. Sehr gern gelesen, trotz der Längen!

.

Elizabeth Garbers „Implosion“ ist das Buch, das ich mir am dringendsten wünschte: stilistisch, erzählerisch etc. eine wunderbar runde Sache.

Woodie Garber, deutschstämmiger Architektensohn, studierte während der Rezession Architektur. Mit seiner zweiten Frau und drei Kindern baute er Mitte der 60er Jahre ein Le-Corbusier-haftes Glashaus in einem Vorort von Cincinatti, Ohio. Elizabeth bewundert ihren (bipolaren, despotischen, frauenfeindlichen, snobistischen) Vater, der mit Jahr zu Jahr mehr Druck aufbaut. Die erste Hälfte des Buchs zeigt die feinen, klug beobachteten Ambivalenzen, mit einem Vater aufzuwachsen, dessen Häuser, Werte, Geschmack etc. ALLES prägen.

Als Elizabeth ca. 14 ist, bedrängt er sie sexuell. Er bedroht und tyrannisiert die Brüder und die Mutter; und parallel zur US-Bürgerrechtsbewegung und -Politisierung Ende der 60er und Elizabeths eigenem Coming-of-Age setzt ein schmerzhafter, ambivalenter, komplexer Emanzipationsprozess ein. Elizabeth Garber hat jahrzehntelange Schreib- und Therapieerfahrung, ein tolles Gespür für Szenen, Widersprüche und relevante Fragen… und vermittelt in einfacher Sprache, ohne ein Wort zu viel, alle Schwierigkeiten, die ein autoritärer Vater mit sich bringt.

Nebenbei ist das Buch eine gute Einführung in den Appeal von Mid-Century Modernism und die Ideale, Sehnsüchte etc. der Männer, die sich damit von ihren eigenen Eltern absetzen wollten. Eine Memoir, halb (…Sally Draper in) „Mad Men“, halb „Der Eissturm“. Emotional erwachsen. Oft überraschend. Immens lesenswert.

„Überraschend“ vor allem, weil Elizabeth ihren Vater nicht aufgeben will. Und ich bis zur letzten Seite nicht wusste, ob ich sie für diese Versuche feiern sollte – oder denken „Der Mann ist toxisch: Lauf! Du schuldest ihm nichts!“

Im Verlag, der Garber veröffentlicht, „She Writes Press“, erscheinen seit 2013 Bücher von Autorinnen: oft Memoirs; manchmal spezifisch über den Vater, u.a. „Veronica’s Grave“ von Barbara Donsky und „The Sportscaster’s Daughter“ von Cindi Michael.

.

sieben aktuelle Bücher, die ins Themenfeld passen:

.

.

Carsten Hueck zu Nadja Spiegelmans „Was nie geschehen ist“: „Im Buch der Tochter spielt Art Spiegelman nun kaum eine Rolle, im Mittelpunkt steht der Lebensweg ihrer Mutter.“

,

mein Vater, ca. 1987.

Frauen im Science-Fiction-Comic [Gasteintrag ‚Binge Reader‘]

DSC01612

.

Ich bin kein Fan von „Paper Girls“: dem aktuell beliebtesten Science-Fiction-Comic in deutschsprachigen Buchblogs.

papergirls1_rgb-ed7f6afd

In bisher vier Sammelbänden stranden vier zwölfjährige Schülerinnen aus Cleveland, die 1988 auf Fahrrädern Zeitungen austragen, in einem Krieg unter Zeitreisenden. Portale und Flugsaurier, Soldaten und Verschwörungen.

Ich liebe die ausdrucksstarken, schlichten Zeichnungen Cliff Chiangs. Autor Brian K. Vaughan gehört seit fast zwanzig Jahren zu den fähigsten Comic-Erzählern. Doch er schrieb auch für „Lost“ – eine Serie, die ich erst mochte, der Figuren wegen…  doch schnell zu hassen lernte, als all diese Figuren zu immer flacheren Spielsteinen wurden. Weil sie nur flüchteten, rannten, Fallen entkamen: In tausend hektisch-öden Standard-Action-Szenarios blieb kaum Raum für Dialoge, komplexer als „Wir müssen zum Frachter! Schnell!“

„Paper Girls“ ist die selbe Sorte flach-naive Schnitzeljagd: Vier Heldinnen, bei denen ich nach fast 500 Seiten noch immer nur ein, zwei Charaktereigenschaften nennen kann, sind auf mehreren Zeitebenen einzig damit beschäftigt, zu laufen, nicht getrennt zu werden und Soldaten, Monstern, Robotern zu entkommen. Ein professioneller Comic? Ja. Doch als Story um Klassen schlechter als „Stranger Things“. Die Figurentiefe? Flacher als in „My Little Pony“.

Toll, vier junge Frauen in der Hauptrolle zu sehen. Doch das geht besser, tiefer!

.

Sabine Delorme bloggt als „Binge Reader“ [Buchblog, Link] und sammelt aktuell Gastbeiträge über Feminismus und Science-Fiction unter #womeninscifi

Es geht u.a. um:

Ich selbst bloggte auf „Binge Reader“ über Science-Fiction-Comics mit Frauen in der Hauptrolle (und manchmal: auch von Frauen gezeichnet und geschrieben).

Heute cross-poste ich den Eintrag noch einmal hier bei mir im Blog, mit ein paar zusätzlichen Bildern.

.

Frauen in SciFi-Comics: 7 Favoriten

 

Twin Spica | in 16 Sammelbänden abgeschlossen

Text und Zeichnungen: Kou Yagunima

9781939130945Die ersten „Harry Potter“-Bände? Als alle neu in Hogwarts sind – und jeden Tag überrumpelt, überrascht werden?

„Twin Spica“ erzählt von einer Schülerin im selben Alter, die Astronautin werden will. Alltag (und viel Sense of Wonder!) in der Akademie. Eine traurige Familiengeschichte. Etwas magischer Realismus. Und die Frage, welche Ziele sich Menschen setzen, die viel verloren haben. Verlust gegen Hoffnung. Zuversicht trotz Trauma. Wer die Optik von 70er-Trickserien wie „Heidi“ mag, findet hier eine emotional komplexe, viel erwachsenere Geschichten im selben Stil. Ich las bis Band 6 von 16. Und bin fasziniert, wie harmlos ein existenzieller, reifer Comic aussehen kann.

.
.

Dept. H | in 4 Sammelbänden abgeschlosen
Text und Zeichnungen: Matt Kindt
29978
Mias Vater ist Tiefseeforscher, Umweltaktivist – der Jacques Cousteau Südasiens. Mia forscht im All, nicht unter Wasser. Bis ihr Vater an Bord seiner Station ermordet wird: Jemand aus der kleinen Crew muss Täter sein; Mia will ihn vor Ort überführen. Doch die Station wird sabotiert… und damit zur Falle. Ein Kammerspiel mit unvergesslichen Figuren, viel Psychologie, trügerisch schlichten Zeichnungen, absurd warmherzigen Rückblenden und einer Spannungskurve wie in den größten Horror- und Thriller-Klassikern: technisch, menschlich, literarisch ist „Dept. H“ der reifste aktuelle Comic, den ich kenne.
.
.
.
.

Lazarus | bisher 5 Sammelbände und der recht nichtssagende Kurzgeschichten-Band „Lazarus X+66“

Text: Greg Rucka, Zeichnungen: Michael Lark
Lazarus_vol04-1
Konzerne regieren die Welt. Jedes große Familienunternehmen herrscht über ein Terrain, wie im Feudalismus. Die Bevölkerung lebt in zwei Gruppen: als wertloser „Waste“ oder als Dienerklasse, „Serf“. Und diplomatische Konflikte werden meist unter Elite-Kampfkräften der Clans ausgetragen. Manchmal durch Krieg, Terrorismus, Spionage. Oft aber in rituellen Duellen: Jede Familie hat einen „Lazarus“.
Clan Carlyle herrscht über die Südwestküste der ehemaligen USA. Tochter Forever Carlyle wurde ihr Leben lang als Lazarus trainiert. Machtspiele, Samurai-Drama, Biotech und tolle Nebenfiguren aus den unteren Klassen: Rucka ist mein Lieblings-Comicautor. „Lazarus“ sein durchgängig packendstes Werk.
.
.
.

Shade | 2 Sammelbände, dann das Crossover „Milk Wars“, dann die Reihe „Shade, the Changing Woman“
Text: Cecil Castellucci, Zeichnungen: Marley Zarcone
SHADE_CHANGING_WOMAN_1_5a29d9685ec3b3.90690476
Eine depressive Vogelfrau vom Planeten Meta stiehlt ein Artefakt, mit dem sie in den Körper des komatösen US-Schulmädchens Megan springt. Megan war hasste sich selbst – und ihre Nicht-Freunde und Mobbing-Opfer Megans fragen sich, warum sie plötzlich spricht wie ferngesteuert. „Shade“ bringt 90er-, Indie- und David-Lynch-Atmosphäre ins DC-Universum; fragt nach Gender, Identität, Körperbildern und Agency. Grandios koloriert, unverwechselbar gezeichnet.
Feministisch, komplex, verspielt, überraschend. Die originellen Bilder, Layouts und Wendungen machen so viel Lesefreude: ein Gegengewicht zu den düsteren Frauen-Leben.
.
,
,


Squirrel Girl | bisher 8 Sammelbände; besonders empfehlenswert ist der Sonderband „The unbeatable Squirrel Girl beats up the Marvel Universe“
Text: Ryan North, Zeichnungen: Erica Henderson
detail
Ich brauchte 100 Seiten, um den Tonfall zu verstehen: Eine Eichhörnchen-Superheldin Anfang 20, die im ersten Semester Computerlinguistik studiert – und sich die gute Laune nie verderben lässt? Sollen wir mit ihr lachen… oder über sie? Doch wer Doreen Green drei, vier Bände lang folgt – schrullige Dialoge, grimmiger Optimismus, zu viele hyper-theoretische, absurde Zeitreise- und Doppelgänger-Storylines, die immer fünf, sechs Seiten zu lang dauern, immer mehrere pedantische Gedankenspiel-Wendungen mehr als nötig nehmen – wird die Figur und ihren Blick nie vergessen. Ein unvergleichlicher Marvel-Comic, albern, kantig, schlau. Lernte Ryan North von Terry Pratchett?
.
.
.

Wandering Island | bisher 2 Sammelbände
Text und Zeichnungen: Kenji Tsuruta
29295
Mikura, eine junge Pilotin mit Wasserflugzeug, liefert an der japanischen Küste als privater Kurierdienst Pakete aus. Die selbe Prämisse wie in „Käptn‘ Balu und seine tollkühne Crew“ – doch erzählt in ruhigen, detaillierten Flug- und Landschaftsbildern. Auch Mikuras Großvater war Pilot: Sein Archiv sammelt Indizien, dass eine mechanische, schwimmende Insel vor der Küste treibt. Sind die Mentoren und Vorbilder in Mikuras Leben wirklich tot – oder verstecken sie sich in einem Steampunk-Exil? „Wandering Island“ zeigt eine absurd schlanke, oft nackte junge Frau, über Seekarten gebeugt. Trotz dem sexistischen Blick und arg dünnem Plot: große Zeichenkunst, tolle Atmosphäre!
.
.
.

Unstoppable Wasp | in 8 Kapiteln / 2 kurzen Sammelbänden abgeschlossen
Text: Jeremy Whitley, Zeichnungen: Elsa Charretier
portrait_incredible(7)
Mädchen und MINT-Fächer? Nadia Pym ist Tochter des verstorbenen Forschers und Avengers Hank Pym: Ant-Man. Die junge (und: lesbische?) Osteuropäerin erbt sein Labor – und fragt sich, weshalb im S.H.I.E.L.D.-Ranking der intelligentesten Menschen so wenige Frauen stehen. Oder Bobbi Morse als Super-Spionin bekannt ist, doch kaum als Wissenschaftlerin. Und, wie solche Probleme strukturell, institutionell, politisch lösbar sind. Ein schwungvoller, farbenfroher, optimistischer Comic für alle ab 11 mit einer idealistischen, hochbegabten, doch nie kitschig-perfekten Heldin.
.
.
.
.
.

5 Mainstream-Superheldinnen:

Thor. 11+ Sammelbände; von Jason Aaron (Text), Russell Dauterman u.a. (Zeichnungen):
detail (2)
2010 nannte ich „Green Lantern“ das „vielleicht letzte große triviale Epos im Comic“: eine wuchtige Space Opera, blutig, überbordend, warmherzig. Seit 2011 schreibt Jason Aaron „Thor“, im selben Stil: Erst geht es vier Sammelbände lang um Odins Sohn. Dann um eine geheimnisvolle Frau, die Thors Hammer übernimmt. Eine Reihe, die immer schneller, facettenreicher, melodramatischer wird. Allergrößte Oper!
.
.
Invincible Iron Man. Bisher 2+ Bände, dann das Crossover „The Search for Tony Stark“; von Brian Michael Bendis (Text), Stefano Caselli (Zeichnungen):
detail (3)
Tony Stark ist fort. Doch sein Bewusstsein hilft, als A.I.-Programm, der brillanten Schülerin Riri Williams beim Bau einer eigenen Iron-Man-Rüstung. Brian Michael Bendis, Erfinder von Jessica Jones, ist einer der wichtigsten (und: feministischsten) Marvel-Autoren. Mit „Invincible Iron Man“ und der (leider: viel schlechteren) parallelen Serie „Infamous Iron Man“ verabschiedet er sich aus dem Marvel-Universum und wechselt zu Konkurrenzverlag DC. Riris Hefte? Young-Adult-Spaß mit allen Figuren, die schon in den Iron-Man-Kinofilmen überzeugten (Pepper Potts etc.) – und Spider-Mans Tante May!
.
.
.
Runaways [Neustart]. Bisher ein Sammelband; von Rainbow Rowell (Text), Kris Anka (Zeichnungen)
236921
Ein Comic-Erfolg ab 2003, seit 2017 auch als TV-Serie: Fünf Jugendliche denken, ihre Eltern seien alte Geschäftsfreunde. Tatsächlich sind sie ein Schurken-Geheimbund. In Rainbow Rowells Neuauflage verging Zeit: Fast alle kriminellen Eltern sind besiegt, die Runaways gehen eigene Wege. Dann gelingt es zweien, eine verstorbene Freundin via Zeitreise in die Gegenwart zu retten. Start einer langsamen, dialoglastigen, gefühlvollen, oft „Buffy“-haften Young-Adult-Reihe über Freundschaft und Entfremdung. Vorwissen über die früheren „Runaways“-Hefte? Kein Muss.
,
,
,
Batwoman. Greg Rucka (Text), J.H. Williams III (Zeichnungen, ab Band 2 auch Text)
16000_900x1350
Kate Kane, Bruce Waynes lesbische, jüdische Cousine, wollte Elite-Soldatin werden. Jetzt kämpft sie gemeinsam mit ihrem Vater, einem Colonel, gegen meist übersinnliche und okkulte Bedrohungen in Gotham City. Eine unverwechselbare Frau in düster-märchenhaften Urban-Fantasy-Abenteuern, oft ebenso unverwechselbar gezeichnet, inszeniert. Die ersten fünf Sammelbände? Die beste DC-Serie seit 2011. Auch James Tynions „Detective Comics“, über Kate als Bat-Team-Chefin, machen Spaß.
,
,
,
Moon Girl. Bisher 5+ Sammelbände; Amy Reeder (Text), Brandon Montclare (Zeichnungen)
portrait_incredible
.
Ein Comic für Kinder ab 8 – über die begabteste Person im Marvel-Universum: eine schwarze Drittklässlerin in Midtown, mit liebevollen Eltern und einem bodenständigen Alltag. Lunella Lafayette lernt einen tumben Saurier kennen, versteckt ihn im geheimen Labor unter der Schule. Ich liebe, dass die Serie viel süßlicher, harmloser sein könnte – doch immer wieder komplizierte Abenteuer und Konflikte entwickelt; und dass Lunella oft atemberaubend arrogant, unterfordert, frustriert sein darf. Eine kindgerechte Kinder-Heldin – mit Profil und Abgründen.
.
.
.
.

6 Sci-Fi-Tipps, in denen Frauen zentral sind – doch nicht die einzige Hauptfigur:

Saga. Bisher 8+ Sammelbände; von Brian K. Vaughan (Text), Fiona Staples (Zeichnungen)
Saga_01-1
Eine Soldatin verliebt sich in einen Mann der gegnerischen Spezies. Die beiden zeugen ein Kind – und flüchten, vor beiden Nationen. Vaughans brutale, aber sehr zärtliche Weltraum-Odyssee zeigt markante, originelle Welten, Wesen; und liebt irre Cliffhanger, Zeitsprünge, dramatische Ironie. Der beste Comic des Jahrzehnts, mit vielen interessanten Frauenfiguren – einige auch queer und/oder trans.
,
.
.
Injection. Bisher 3+ Sammelbände; von Warren Ellis (Text), Declan Shalvey (Zeichnungen)
Injection_01-1
Fünf britische Genies – zwei Frauen, drei Männer – setzen eine künstliche Intelligenz in die Welt. Doch das Programm glaubt, wachsen zu können, indem es prüft, ob es Übersinnliches, fremde Dimensionen, okkulte Wesen gibt – und diese kontrollieren kann. Ein Mystery-Comic im Stil von „Akte X“, „Fringe“ oder „Torchwood“, mit Figuren, inspiriert von „Dr. Who“, James Bond und Sherlock Holmes. Autor Warren Ellis liebt Technologie, Literatur, Mythologie – und spielt hier kongenial mit britischen Pulp-Nationalmythen.
.
.
.
Invisible Republic. Bisher 3+ Sammelbände; von Gabriel Hardman (Text und Zeichnungen), Corinna Bechko (Zeichnungen)
InvisibleRepublic_vol1-1
Die Menschheit hat ein fremdes Sonnensystem besiedelt – doch der Mond Avalon wurde durch Bergbau, Korruption und einen Stellvertreterkrieg zur Militärdiktatur. Ein junger Partisane und seine Cousine wollen das Regime stürzen. Mit welchen Mitteln? Auf zwei Zeitebenen zeigt Hardman Geopolitik, Kolonialismus, linke Debatten; und fragt nach der Rolle von Whistleblowern und Presse. Ein realistischer, manchmal grauer Geheimtipp, der optisch an Osteuropa in den 70ern erinnert. Eine TV-Version? Kommt sicher bald. Perfekte Vorlage!
.
.
.
The Vision. In 2 Sammelbänden abgeschlossen; von Tom King (Text), Gabriel Hernandez Walta (Zeichnungen)
detail (4).jpg
Ein Android mit Sehnsucht nach Menschlichkeit baut sich eine Kleinfamilie, zieht in die Vorstadt… und erlebt, wie in einem magischen Norman-Rockwell-Herbst alles vor die Hunde geht: „The Vision“ beginnt als „domestic drama“ im satirischen Retro-Look. Doch in Band 2 tauchen auch andere Avengers, Victor Mancha, die Scarlet Witch auf – und aus einer „Mad Men“-artigen Parabel wird ein Helden-Thriller. Nerdig, menschlich, überraschend. Und, wie immer bei Tom King: voller Motivketten, formaler Spielchen und erzählerischer Tricks. Souverän!
.
.
.
Black Hammer. Bisher 3+ Sammelbände sowie mehrere Spin-Off-Comics; von Jeff Lemire (Text), (Zeichnungen)
focus@2x
Eine Gruppe Superhelden, wie wir sie aus den 50ern und 60ern kennen, dem „Golden“ und dem „Silver Age“ der Heldencomics, ist seit Jahrzehnten gestrandet – in einem künstlichen Retro-Dorf. Kanadier Jeff Lemire liebt Groschenheft-Klischees. Und ehrliche, tiefe Provinz-Melancholie. „Black Hammer“ ist ein neues, eigenes Erzähl-Universum, das klassische Figuren wie Mary Marvel, Lex Luthor und Martian Manhunter neu denkt. Liebevoll, morbide, intelligent.
.
.
.
Darth Vader. In 4 Sammelbänden und dem Crossover „Vader Down“ abgeschlossen; doch fortgesetzt in der (schwächeren) Serie „Star Wars: Doctor Aphra; von Kieron Gillen (Text), Salvador Larroca (Zeichnungen)
Dr. Aphra ist Archäologin (und lesbisch) – und hat keine Skrupel, fürs Imperium zu arbeiten. In klugen Polit- und Action-Dramen, die alle zwischen Episode IV und V spielen, kämpfen Vader und Aphra mit- und gegeneinander. Sie überlisten Rebellen. Verbündete. Und alle, die versuchen, sie zu verraten. Ein Comic voll zynischer Figuren – der jedoch selbst nie menschenfeindlich, respektlos wird. Sondern zeigt, wie im totalitären Imperium jeder leidet – unter jedem anderen.
.
.
.
.
.
,
,
,
.
15 Comics, auf die ich mich freue:

.

.

Hawkeye Kate

tolles Panel aus: „Hawkeye: Kate Bishop“, Vol. 2