Comics

“DuckTales” (2017): 50 Things I learned about Scrooge McDuck… by reading the original comics of Carl Barks & Don Rosa

.

.

.

  • the file names of all images in this post include the issue number or the name of the story they’re from.

.

.

.
.

50_Scrooge McDuck first appeared in the Donald Duck comic “Christmas on Bear Mountain” (1947):

.

  • Scrooge was an old miser modelled after Ebenezer Scrooge from Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol”…
  • So it’s fitting that his first story is set on Christmas.
  • Scrooge invites his nephew Donald  and his great-nephews Huey, Lewey and Louie to his mansion on Bear Mountain…
  • …but, as a secret test, dresses up as a bear to find out if Donald (and the kids) are brave and have strength of character.

.

49_In 1947, Donald looks a lot more duck-like, and Duckburg looks VERY Californian:

.

  • Why does Donald live in a house where he can barely reach his own door knob?
  • All duck characters are modelled after North American pekin ducks, but over the years, their necks get drawn shorter.

.

48_Scrooge LOVES the $-sign:

.

  • I particular like the money-green, $-covered undershirt he wears unter his frock…
  • …and the money-green, $-covered curtains in his office.
  • His frock is red, blue, green, sometimes black: It varies from comic to comic.
  • Apparently, it’s always the same piece of clothing, bought in 1902:

.

.

47_Scrooge’s first money bin was in the countryside:

.

  • Scrooge thought that no one would look inside, anyways: It’s near a farm, so people would think it was a corn silo.
  • Many early stories focus on Scrooge’s attempts to hide his wealth from the world…
  • …or find a safe place to stash away his “three cubic acres of money”.
  • In the story below, “Island in the Sky”, Scrogge wants to hide all his money on an asteroid:

.

.

46_Most of Scrooge’s coins are silver, not gold:

.

  • As a European reader, it’s weird to see all the Dollar Signs:
  • In Italian or Scandinavian “Onkel Dagobert” comics, the logo on his money bin says “DD” [for “Dagobert Duck”], and the gold coins are in a fictional (or outdated) currency called “Taler”: If they even have a sign on it, it’s usually a “T”.
  • [Every time Scrooge mentions his businesses, he talks about railroads. But what is a “fish house”, in 1950s Duckburg?]

.

45_A later money bin was housed in an office building on a regular street:

.

  • The Beagle Boys bought the empty lot next to the bin and drilled a hole to syphon out the coins.
  • Yet another later design shows a money bin up on a hill. When the Beagle Boys try to drill through the bottom, Donald floods the bin the wash them out…
  • …but then, sudden cold weather freezes up the water-and-coins-mix – and the money bin combusts.
  • For other Barks-designed money bins over the years, see the second picture below, by Don Rosa, after Carl Barks.

.

.

.

44_Carl Barks LOVES silhouettes

.

  • The visual storytelling is often straightforward, the panel layouts are simple…
  • …but there are some beautiful effects with black outlines. Particularly in the story below, set on an island near Hawaii:
  • “The Menehune Mystery”, 1953

.

.

43_Donald often ponders his masculinity: Is he brave?

.

  • The classic animated cartoons often show Donald as short-tempered and silly…
  • …and European comics depict him as lazy, incompetent or neglectful of his nephews…
  • So it’s fun to see a Donald Duck who’s at least competent enough to identify deerskin, or know what a curator is:

.

.

42_”Christmas on Bear Mountain” suggests that Scrooge doesn’t respect Donald because Donald lacks bravery:

.

  • In episode 2 of the current “DuckTales” cartoon (2017), Webby says that Donald Duck is “one of the most daring adventurers of all time”.
  • And even in the earliest Barks comics, we are supposed to be on Donald’s side.

.

41_Scrooge just wants to be “rich and lonely”:

.

  • Initially, the public doesn’t know about Scrooge’s wealth and he’s not recognized on the street.
  • Once people find out and ask him for favors, he’s annoyed.
  • But even though fame is not important to him, he wants to be the richest person/duck in the world.

.

.

40_Donald can’t publicly shame Scrooge for being stingy:

.

  • Aggressive “go away!” signs and traps have surrounded the hillside of his money bin since the earliest drawings.
  • I’m reminded of Ayn Rand’s cutthroat capitalism, and a conversation in the “Atlas Shrugged” movie:
    Paul Larkin: They say you’re intractable, you’re ruthless, your only goal is to make money.
    Henry Rearden: My only goal is to make money.
    Larkin: Yes, but you shouldn’t say it.

.

39_Donald clearly knows that Scrooge leads an unhappy, neurotic life:

.

  • I love how snarky Donald acts here: He sees the irony.
  • Many Barks comics show how Scrooge suffers, worries and gets paranoid because of his wealth. He seems sad or neurotic most of the time.

.

.

38_When it comes to happiness, Donald seems wiser than his uncle:

.

  • Some of these conversations run suprisingly deep!
  • Scrooge often seems uncultured, narrow-minded, and maybe traumatized from his childhood in Scotland:

.

.

37_There’s also THIS iconic, character-defining quote about Scrooge’s past:

.

  • “[I made my money] by being tougher than the toughies, and smarter than the smarties! And I made it square!”
  • The DuckTales 2013 remastered video game has a special “tougher than the toughies” mode / difficulty level. Video here: Link.
  • Scrooge also gives his “tougher than the toughies” speech in the first episode of “DuckTales” (2017) – but his housekeeper is not even listening. In the episode, he seems full of himself and out of touch with the present.

.

36_When Scrooge dives into his coins, he often uses the same catch-phrases and mantras:

.

  • “I like to dive around in my money like a porpoise! And burrow through it like a gopher! And toss it up and let it hit me on the head!”
  • He fills bath tubs with coins, too.
  • [His rival Flintheart Glomgold does the same.]

.

35_Other characters hurt if they dive into coins:

.

  • “Why didn’t you get hurt?” – “Well, I’ll admit – it’s a trick!”
  • No further details on the mechanics of this “trick”, though.

.

34_From the beginning, there are more than 30 different Beagle Boys.

.

  • So it has to be an organized gang – not just some group of siblings or close relatives.

.

33: This scene was a huge inspiration for “Raiders of the Lost Ark” / “Indiana Jones”

.

  • The Beagle Boys try to steal a Native American statue – but once they lift it, a boulder is let loose as a death trap.
  • After Barks inspired “Raiders of the Lost Ark”, “Raiders” inspired the archeological mysteries of “DuckTales”.
  • I think that’s why the logos for DuckTales and Indiana Jones are so similar.
  • (Red, orange, yellow was a trend for logos in the 1980s.)

.

.

.

32_Some panels favor naturalism and details:

.

  • In the above story, Scrooge hid all his money in a lake, but the Beagle Boys bought the land below and used termites to burst the dam.
  • Below, Scrooge uses an x-ray-machine to look through walls in his family’s castle in Scotland.
  • Barks liked aviation, deep-sea-exploration and gadgets, and I like how matter-of-factly all characters use newish technology like slide machines.

.

.

31_Barks doesn’t get too cartoon-y very often:

.

  • This is one of the most childish moments I found.
  • Later on, this Beagle Boy is carried along on a piece of string, like a balloon, so that he wouldn’t float away.
  • Below is a rather inspired moment: Donald spent days nailed inside a box. When he comes out, even his speech balloon is box-shaped:

.

.

30_Another (rather rare!) moment of surrealism and physical comedy:

.

  • I loved the scene below: Most comics would just show a 2D-tunnel snaking through the page. But Barks took the time to depict a spiral and convey some sense of perspective and depth.
  • Generally, the Beagle Boys do a lot of digging and mining. It gets boring quickly.

.

.

29_Wet feathers DO that?

.

  • This is the only time I saw a wet duck character looking poofy.
  • Overall, characters looked recognizable and on-model nearly all the time – there wasn’t much early installment weirdness (Link).
  • I liked that Scrooge seems to know which nephew is wich: He sometimes called them by names, individually.
  • (personally, I needed the 2017 reboot to properly tell them apart.)
  • Disney archivist Dave Smith: Huey is in red because red is the brightest “hue.” Dewey wears blue, the color of “dew,” a.k.a. water. That “leaves” Louie, the nephew wearing leaf green.

.

.

28_Few women, few different body shapes:

.

  • Most crowd scenes by Barks show men. Women are only seen if the gag or scene would not work with male characters: If they are mothers, dancers etc.
  • Italian and Scandinavian Duck comics often use crass and comical body shapes, so when I saw the two mannequins in the background, I thought:
  • Most of the Disney comics I read had TONS of these funny-looking carricature people in them.
  • The manniquins prove that Barks saw the visual appeal. I don’t know why he didn’t use them more often.
  • Is the anti-capitalist guy below modelled after some real-life person?
  • And: How awesome is that random background detail?

.

.

27_I only found one Barks story that MIGHT pass the Bechdel test:

.

  • Two female characters? With names? Who talk to each other? About something other than a man? [Bechdel Test, Link]
  • I want more Magica DeSpell, I haven’t seen Daisy Duck or Grandma Duck in a Barks story yet, and I personally like Brigitta McBridge.
  • Barks tells boy stories, and there is never much room for women – usually, they’re a distraction.

.

26_I love Goldie’s scrawny look:

.

  • Goldie had a dance hall during the Yukon gold rush. She still lives in Alaska, with her pet bear.
  • She has a makeover for Scrooge and CAN look more regal…
  • But it’s fun to see that time has not been kind to either Scrooge or her: Scrooge stories are often about regrets and mortality.

.

25_Italian sorceress Magica DeSpell is a master of disguises…

.

  • Magica is based on Gina Lollobrigida and Sophia Loren. I was surprised that she’s very, very poor and unkempt, and I think there might be some racist stereotypes against Italians in play.
  • I love how snarky and self-aware everyone acts in the below scene:

.

.

24_Many iconic elements were created by Barks, right away:

.

  • Magica is capable, dangerous, ambitious and snarky, and I enjoyed seeing her wreaking havoc.
  • Apparently, her pet raven Poe is her bewitched brother – but I have not seen that relationship explored in detail before.
  • Below: the first appearence of Magica’s cabin near Mt. Vesuvius, drawn by Barks… and a recreation by Don Rosa, 40 years later.
  • “Ogres for Rent” is inspiring and funny.Barks is original. Don Rosa is, too often, just pedanitc.

.

.

23_Barks is HORRIBLE at depicting cultures:

.

  • Here’s a kind, obese and dim-witted Hawaiian guy… surrounded by invisible, fairy-like beings that helped the Ducks during an Hawaiian adventure.
  • These characters are based on actual myth – they’re called Menehune (Link).
  • Barks gets a LOT of credit for incorporating myths and legends into his storytelling. But I’m appaled by the shallowness, the stereotypes and the one-dimensional roles that these ethnic and “savage” characters often play.
  • Below: The city of Atlantis, and Bark’s AWESOME idea that Atlanteans milk whales…
  • Also: an Atlantean teacher/academic. The cap and the glasses are just lazy storytelling, and the character design bores/annoys me.

.

.

22_Often, all members of a minority look identical:

.

  • True: Huey, Dewey and Loie look identical, too. But it’s strangely… sad to see all these tribes and cultures when, most of the time, you can’t see ANY diversity in age, any women etc.
  • Barks often just draws the same character model, without additional details, again and again. They literally all look the same.

.

21_DuckTales (1987) used quite a lot of his design ideas:

.

  • The aliens in the 1950s comic book look lazy. The 1980s alien doesn’t look original – but still much better.
  • Often, Bark seems to have good ideas for characters – and just lacks the motivation to play with them, diversify etc.

.

20_Armadillo-like stone people who cause earthquakes?

.

  • Some wear bow-ties. Some wear ties. All seem to be male. But at least there are both children and different colors.
  • And (I never saw this episode!) they made it into the 1987 cartoon intact. Cute!

.

.

19_Barks loves the Space Age:

.

  • I like all these rocket designs, and I like the particularly retro design of the “outdated” spaceship that Scrooge bought second-hand.
  • There’s an effortless and very charming sense of wonder in these stories!
  • Below is a story that, matter-of-factly and without context, says that Duckburg had “advanced MUCH farther than other cities in the world” (maybe because of Gyro Gearloose?). I love the idea of a (retro-)futuristic Duckburg – but sadly, I  have not see this mentioned ever again.
  • In 2000, the “Superman” comic books had a storyline where villain Brainiac unleashed a “Y2K virus” to Metropolis – the city was turned into a literal “city of tomorrow”, with flying cars and futuristic buildings. It lasted a while, but sadly, story- or design-wise, nothing too exciting came out of it.

.

.

.

18_Hewey, Duwey and Luie are earnest… but lack personality:

.

  • Nothing sets them apart, and they’re not all that interesting together: I like that they’re not as bratty and mean-spirited towards Donald as they are in the European books, and they’re not as docile and wide-eyed as they’re in “DuckTales” (1987). But I didn’t love them, and I don’t think Barks loves them, either.
  • Below is ONE nice and charming touch: To speak with more authority, one of the siblings climbs on top of the others.

.

.

17_The Junior Woodchucks are all-mighty:

.

  • Barks created the scouting organization and their all-knowing book. Sometimes, the book is used for trivia or exposition… but in one adventure set in Greece, the siblings suddenly (and with no in-story explanation) become INSANELY pedantic.
  • Below, they use an axe to transform an iceberg into a viking longship.
  • And look at these Junior Woodchuck Homing ROCKETS. What could go wrong?

.

.

.

16_Super-Hero comics had a silly “Silver Age”. Barks is a child of that era, too:

.

  • Above, tiny Native-American-like aliens are climbing a rope from their barren home asteroid to a nearby planet that’s full of fruit.
  • Below, the nephews instantly learn their language… by consulting their Junior Woodchuck book.
  • Plus: “They kneel like the American Savages kneeled to Columbus”. Sigh. #colonialism
  • Here’s more about the silliness of “Silver Age”-superhero stories: Link

.

.

15_Flintheart Glomgold is an inefficiant foil to Scrooge:

.

  • They are too similar, and the pedantic and vulgar way they measure their figurative dicks gets tired fast.
  • Flintheart lives in South Africa and has a money bin that sports the Pound sign instead of the dollar sign.
  • Because of the tensions over Apartheid in the late 1980s, “DuckTales” (1987) made Flintheart a Scot.
  • Below, in “Christmas on Bear Mountain”, Scrooge looks like Flintheart himself.
  • In the new “DuckTales” reboot (2017), Flintheart looks plumper and much more distinct.

.

.

14_How fictional is the Duck universe?

.

  • The above panel brings tons of problems:
  • It’s Flintheart’s second appearance, and for some reason (old age?), Scrooge had forgotten about him and needs a long time to recognize his biggst rival. In another story, Donald is asked by Scrooge to collect a debt at a specific address, and he needs to walk down the front lawn and ring before he understands that it’s his own address. For comedic reasons, both Scrooge and Donald have some tedious and out-of-character “Too dumb to live” and “Idiot Ball” moments.
    .
  • A bigger problem, above and below: There are real-world locales in the Duck universe. There are entire fictional nations. And there are shallow parodies, like the “Vampire State Bulding” or “Gemstonia”.
  • Often, Barks shows us the worst of both worlds: One-dimensional invented cultures (that could be much deeper with some additional effort)… and real-world spaces that feel shoddily researched.
  • [Later on, Italian Disney artists often told GREAT time-travel stories where Mickey Mouse travelled through European/Italian history.]

.

.

13_Are ethnic strangers caricatures?

.

  • I HATE that all the characters above come from the same comic, drawn by Barks, and live in the same region: There’s a rather naturalistic Tibetan or Nepalese academic… and there are yellow Himalaya duck-people who, to me, look super-offensive.
  • For the “DuckTales” (1987) episode based on this story, “Trala-La”, the characters were re-designed (Link).
  • Below: a sheik with a typical dog nose and stereotypical clothes… and, in the same comic, savage bush men.

.

.

12_Dog-like humanoids… meet naturalistic humans:

.

  • NOTHING about the camel-riding guy above speaks “Duck comic” to me.
  • It’s grating to see that over-simple character design often makes characters seem simpler/stupider than they are: Imagine the scene below, but with more human-like and serious-looking characters. It would be MUCH more dramatic, and less comedic.

.

.

11_Scrooge is well-travelled, and sometimes, Barks shows his research.

.

  • Is that actual Bengali in these speech bubbles?
  • And why is Scooge making that snarky joke “I learned it when I sold road maps to Marco Polo? In a different story above, he says – much more enthusiastically: “It’s ancient Cathay. I learned it when I was a yak buyer in Tibet.”
  • I still love Scrooge’s curiosity, and his enthusiasm to understand different cultures (to make deals with them and exploit them – but still.)
  • Below: the most naturalistic (and bustiest) woman I saw in a Duck comic by Barks… and some Thai dancers whose design I like… but who look too identical to me: Make these extras individuals!

.

.

.

10_Barks understood Globalization:

.

  • In 1957’s “The City of Golden Roofs”, both Scrooge and Donald become salesmen and try to make big money. They are both assigned Indochina, the   only untapped market, and when Scrooge tries to sell a giant oven, it starts out like the old “selling fridges to an eskimo” joke.
  • Surprisingly, Scrooge doesn’t succeed – while Donald is WILDLY successful… because enough people globally love tapes with contemporary bongo/calypso music.

.

.

.

09_Some Scrooge schemes are inspired. Some are just childish:

.

  • Above: Scrooge changes all his money to bills and cans them – like spinach. For the canning process, he uses robots so that no employees steel from him. Wonderful, silly, inventive idea.
  • Below: The money bin’s burglarly system backfires when Scrooge activates the cannon. The cannon fires… through several buildings… and the cannon ball bounces back when it “hits a stack of mattresses in a rubber mattress factory”. Sorry: No. Just no. (I like the art, though!)

.

.

08_Was Barks pro-capitalism? It’s hard to tell:

.

  • I LOVE that a corporation like Disney tells all these stories about the dangers, problems and paradoxes of wealth, capitalism, exploitation.
  • It seems to be a running gag that whenever Scrooge offers a job to Donald or the nephews, he offers them 30 cents per hour. (Sometimes per day.)

.

.

07_Longer Barks stories often feel like “The Simpsons”:

.

  • About 50 “big” stories by Barks run between 20 and 30 pages. They never get boring, because all too often, they start with a premise, take a weird turn in the middle and end in a completely different locale and with different problems: They very much feel like a later-season-episode of “The Simpson”, where the weirdness that starts out the episode has little connection to the weirdness that later propels the plot.
  • This often feels humdrum or careless – but it’s also exciting, suprising, remarkably entertaining: Why are the Ducks camouflaged as fish? Really: You never saw that coming 5 pages earlier, and it won’t matter 5 pages later. But it’s fun while it lasts!

.

06_If you understand colonialism, MANY Barks stories will make you angry:

.

  • “Africa is nobody’s friend?” Really?
  • In the story below, Scrooge gifts his giant oven/stove to a king and his palace. The oven melts the gold plating of the palace roof, so Scrooge steals the liquid gold and runs away. I love the drawing of the impressive elephants – but I hate how the story ends with celebrating Scrooge’s success: He robbed these people, and we’re supposed to like him for it.

.

.

05_I thought that I read Carl Barks in 1990. I did not:

.

  • Above: Carl Barks’ “Lost in the Andes!”, 1949. Below: Don Rosa’s sequel “Return to Plain Awful”, 1989.
  • The sequel was serialized in Germany’s Micky Maus [“Zurück ins Land der viereckigen Eier”, 1990].
  • So from age 7 to age 34, I thought that I knew Barks and his flaws and quirks…
  • …when really, they were Don Rosa’s flaws and quirks: pedantic storytelling, thick inking, reference-heavy jokes for fans.
  • When I finally read the original “Lost in the Andes” today, I did not love it. But I see how it is a great story for 1949, on a literary and on an artistic level. “Return to Plain Awful” isn’t that much of an achievement for comics of 1989, though. Sorry: I loved discovering and reading Barks. I’m much less lenient with Rosa’s stories, published in the 80s and 90s: In many ways, they look MORE dated and stiffer than Barks’ originals.

.

.

04_Reading Rosa is fun AFTER reading Barks, though:

.

  • Now that I have read that much Barks, I think I will read Don Rosa’s “The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck” (German: “Onkel Dagobert: Sein Leben, seine Milliarden”). I dislike both “Tintin” and “Asterix” – because I grew up with dads of my friends who said that THESE were the comics that could actually teach you about the world. I didn’t enjoy them as a kid, and I still can’t say if they were too didactic, or the wrong kind of didactic, or even not didactic enough. I just never wanted to learn through “Tintin” or “Asterix”.
  • Reading Don Rosa, I feel like it speaks to the same generation and the same attitude towards comics: They’re dense, stiff, overwrought, gray, trying too hard… and BOY, CAN YOU LEARN A LOT HERE.
  • I’m not sure if I want to. But I can see how this is the perfect gift to every Tintin- and Asterix-loving dad I know:

.

.

03_Scrooge as Citizen Kane?

.

  • For years, I thought that Scrooge predated “Citizen Kane” (and Ayn Rand’s hypercapitalist books).
  • Don Rosa used the similarities for the above hommage in his character-defining and award-winning 12-part story “The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck”. It’s fun – but I really wish that a Disney duck had inspired Orson Welles, not the other way around.

.

02_Carl Barks retired from drawing Scrooge comics in 1967:

.

  • …but he kept on painting his hero in the 70s and 80s.
  • Many of these paintings are used or re-staged in the 2017 “DuckTales” series. It’ll be interesting to see who painted them in-universe: Who’s the artist that Scrooge hired, and is he similar to Carl Barks?
  • Don Rosa decided/estimated that Scrooge was born in 1867 and died in 1967, aged 100. Rosa’s stories are set during this historical time-frame. He wrote an episode of “DuckTales” (1987), but did not enjoy that the show was set in the 80s: To him, Scrooge McDuck is dead.
  • The 2017 show makes use of Rosa’s “Family Tree” (based on Barks), and we might see some little-seen characters later in season 1.

.

.

01_The new DuckTales is VERY good!

.

  • I was nervous because Webby and the nephews seemed aggressive and too hipster-y (or “Gravity Falls”-like) in the trailers, but…
  • …wow: I love the soundtrack, I enjoy most of the animation, I LOVE the pace, and I think there’s a great balance between humor, adventure and character-driven moments.
  • I have a hard time understanding Donald. Launchpad seems one-dimensional. I don’t know why Scrooge lives in a mansion and not in his money bin.
  • But really: After seeing the first two episodes, I know that I want to watch the rest, and that I can recommend this to kids and grown-ups.
  • (I also like that Darkwing Duck will show up, and that “TaleSpin”‘s Cape Suzette and “Goof Troops” Spoonerville have been mentioned.)

.

.

.

I did read Carl Barks’:

Christmas on Bear Mountain [1947], The Old Castle’s Secret [1948], Lost in the Andes! [1949], A Financial Fable [1951], Only a Poor Old Man [1952], The Golden Helmet [1952], The Gilded Man [1952], Back to the Klondike [1953], The Menehune Mystery [1953], The Secret of Atlantis [1954], Tralla La [1954], The Fabulous Philosopher’s Stone [1955], The Golden Fleecing [1955], Land Beneath the Ground! [1956], The Second-Richest Duck [1956], City of Golden Roofs [1957], The Golden River [1958], The Money Champ [1959], Island in the Sky [1960], North of the Yukon [1965], Horsing Around with History [1994].

I also read Don Rosa’s The Life & Times of Scrooge McDuck Companion [collection, 2006] and Return to Plain Awful [1989, I read this as a child in the German Micky Maus-Magazin, 1990]

I also enjoyed an Italian meta-story that I read in German as a child: Der Mann hinter den Ducks [1992] by Rudy Salvagnini & Giorgio Cavazzano [German version published in: Lustiges Taschenbuch 196]

.

Stories by Carl Barks that were adapted into DuckTales [1987] episodes [found here]:

  • “Back to the Klondike” “Back to the Klondike”
  • “Land Beneath the Ground!” “Earthquack”
  • “Micro-Ducks from Outer Space” “Microducks from Outer Space”
  • “The Lemming with the Locket” “Scrooge’s Pet”
  • “The Lost Crown of Genghis Khan!” “The Lost Crown of Genghis Khan”
  • “Hound of the Whiskervilles” “The Curse of Castle McDuck”
  • “The Giant Robot Robbers” “Robot Robbers”
  • “The Golden Fleecing”
  • “The Horseradish Story” “Down and Out in Duckburg”
  • “The Status Seeker”
  • “The Unsafe Safe” “The Unbreakable Bin”
  • “Tralla La” “The Land of Trala-la”
  • also, “Terror of the Beagle Boys” inspired parts of “Super DuckTales”

.

Bonus: Webby’s “Wall of Crazy” from the DuckTales (2017) pilot episode, shown on Reddit [Link to r/Ducktales]

.

.

“DuckTales”: neue Episoden nach 30 Jahren.
Familie, Humor, Schatzsuche: Disney adaptiert die Comics von Carl Barks und Don Rosa neu fürs TV. Kindgerecht – oder für alte Fans?
Warum leben Tick, Trick und Track bei ihrem Onkel Donald? Warum ist Donalds eigene Bezugsperson in der Familie Duck sein Onkel Dagobert? Zum ersten Mal will Disney solche Fragen im großen Stil beantworten – in “DuckTales”, einer Neuauflage der Trickserie von 1987. Am 12. August zeigte der Disney-Sender XD Episode 1 und 2 im US-TV, ein Deutschlandstart ist für 2018 geplant. Bisher glückt der Neustart – auch in vielen radikaleren Ideen und Entscheidungen.
Seit 1938 zeichnete und schrieb Carl Barks für Disney; ab 1943 wurden seine Donald-Duck-Comics länger und komplexer: oft 30 Seiten voller Schatzsuchen und Abenteuer. 1947 erfand Barks den vereinsamten und menschenfeindlichen Milliardär Scrooge McDuck, für ein Weihnachtscomic mit Charles-Dickens- und Citizen-Kane-Motiven. Dagobert verkleidet sich heimlich, weil er Donald und den Neffen nur Geschenke überlassen will, falls sie Mut gegen Bären beweisen. Dann bricht ein echter Bär in die Villa ein, und erschreckt auch Dagobert im Bären-Kostüm. Für Carl Barks bleibt Donald Duck noch 20 Jahre lang meist die Hauptfigur. Doch Barks harscher, exzentrischer und oft tragisch geiziger Dagobert wird (besonders auch durch europäische Comics aus Italien und Skandinavien) weltbekannt.
“Jäger des verlorenen Schatzes”, Teil eins der “Indiana Jones”-Reihe, übernimmt 1981 eine Barks-Szene, in der die Panzerknacker eine indianische Statue auf einem Podest verschieben – und damit eine Steinkugel ins Rollen bringen, als Todesfalle für Grabräuber. Sechs Jahre später schaut der Disney-Konzern auf “Indiana Jones”, für seine bis dahin teuerste und langlebigste Trickserie: Bei “DuckTales” (1987) heuert Donald Duck bei der Marine an. Tick, Trick und Track leben in der Villa Onkel Dagoberts, zusammen mit Nicky, der Tochter der Haushälterin und Bruchpilot Quack. Viele Figuren, die Barks erfand, hatten damals große Rollen: Hexe Gundel Gaukeley, Erfinder Daniel Düsentrieb. Bis 1990 erzählten etwa 15 von 100 “DuckTales”-Folgen alte Barks-Comics neu.
1967 ging Carl Barks in den Ruhestand. Er starb erst 2000, mit 99 Jahren. Vor allem in den 70er Jahren zeichnete er große Dagobert-Ölgemälde, und seit den 80er Jahren versucht Zeichner und Barks-Fan Don Rosa, aus den Details, die Barks in Comics oft eher humorvoll hinwirft, eine große Lebensgeschichte von Dagobert Duck zu rekonstruieren: “Onkel Dagobert: Sein Leben, seine Milliarden”. Für Don Rosa wurde Duck 1867 in Schottland geboren und starb 1967 in Entenhausen. Historische Abenteuer, oft in einem sehr konkreten geschichtlichen Rahmen: der Goldrausch am Yukon River in Alaska, Cowboy-Abenteuer in Indonesien, doch wie bei Barks auch Reisen zu Fantasie-Zivilisationen wie dem Land der viereckigen Eier, versteckt in den Anden.
Die Comics von Barks sind schwungvoll, albern, oft kapitalismuskritisch und mitreißend. Don Rosa wirkt pedantischer, nervöser, überfachtet: Abenteuer- und Männercomics fast ohne interessante Frauen, teuer gesammelt oft von Männern jener Generation, die mir als Kind, 1990, auch “Asterix” und “Tim und Struppi” gaben und raunten “Lies! Da kannst du noch was lernen!”. Deutschlehrer-Comics, Bildungsbürger-Comics, Pedanten-Comics, in Deutschland atemlos erfolgreich älteren Herren, die “Duck” mit “u” aussprechen: Donaldisten.
“DuckTales” (1987) blieb eine Kinderserie: oft etwas schleppend erzählt, zu simple Lösungen, kaum Psychologie. Tick, Trick und Track bleiben schlimm gutmütig und passiv. Nicky ist so jung, rosa, naiv und unwichtig wie keine andere Disney-Serienfigur nach ihr. Als 2017 erste Trailer für den “DuckTales”-Neustart veröffentlicht wurden, waren Fans nervös: Nicky ist hier ein hyperkompetentes Nerd-Mädchen mit Geheimagenten-Tick. Sie bewegt sich durch Dagoberts Villa wie in “Mission: Impossible”. Tick, Trick und Track haben klare Persönlichkeiten, aber wirken übertrieben aggressiv: Tick (rot) trumpft durch Wissen auf, Trick (blau) ist nassforsch und liebt Abenteuer, und Track (grün) wird von Fans mit Slytherin-Figuren aus “Harry Potter” verglichen: ambitioniert, aber verschlagen.
Die große Angst der Fans: Klingt, witzelt, frotzelt und erzählt “DuckTales” 2017 wie jede andere US-Trickserie? Stülpt Disney das Strickmuster gesucht hipper Konzepte wie “Gravity Falls” über die Barks-Figuren? Nein. Die flächigen, an alte Comics erinnernden Hintergründe und Farben der neuen Serie sind schroffer als die warmen, liebevollen Details im Original. Die Neuauflage erzählt dreimal so schnell. Doch bisher auf höchstem Niveau: warmherzig, mitreißend, überraschend – eine Kinderserie fürs größte denkbare Publikum. Und überall in Dagoberts Villa hängen die alten Barks-Ölgemälde! Ein Problem bleibt nur Donald Duck. Toll, dass er dieses Mal selbst bei Dagobert einziehen darf. Schlimm aber, dass man seine typische Enten-Schnatterstimme kaum versteht. Donald liefert zwanzig handlungstragende Sätze oder Pointen pro Episode. Bei zwei Dritteln verstehe ich nur “Quack!” Sobald die Serie erzählen wird, wo Donalds Eltern sind oder warum die Neffen von Donalds Schwester in seiner Obhut aufwuchsen, wird das anstrengend und holprig.
“DuckTales” läuft erst ab 2018 in deutscher Synchronisation auf dem Bezahl-Sender Disney XD.

Die besten Comics & Graphic Novels 2016: meine Empfehlungen bei Deutschlandradio Kultur

Deutschlandradio Kultur - Comic-Empfehlungen 2016, Stefan Mesch.PNG

.

bei Deutschlandradio Kultur empfehle ich meine 20 Comics des Jahres:

.

schon 2015 stellte ich 20 aktuelle Reihen vor, hier (Link).

.

.

20. Black Magick
Autor: Greg Rucka, Zeichnerin: Nicola Scott
Image Comics, Oktober 2015 bis Februar 2016.
5+ Hefte in 1+ Sammelbänden, wird Mitte 2017 fortgesetzt.

20 black magick.png

Wer nie ein aktuelles US-Comic las, findet im Mystery-Thriller “Black Magick” einen simplen, geradlinigen Einstieg: Greg Rucka ist mein Lieblings-Comicautor, Nicola Scott eine der beliebtesten Zeichnerinnen. “Black Magick” zeigt Rowan Black, Ermittlerin in Portland, Oregon und Mitglied eines geheimen heidnischen Kults: Rowan ist eine Hexe. Sie hat okkulte Kräfte, wird in eine Geiselnahme verwickelt, muss Ritualmorde aufklären – ohne, sich vor Kollegen zu enttarnen.

Eine etwas altbackene Idee, in Band 1 noch nicht anspruchsvoller erzählt als in TV-Einerlei wie “Charmed” oder “Constantine”. Auch Rowans Vokuhila-Frisur lässt viele Szenen gestrig wirken. Doch Rucka ist Experte für Polizeiarbeit, liebt feministische, komplexe Ensembles, und Nicola Scott hat ein Auge für Lichtstimmung und Grusel. 2016 waren beide mit einer (leider steifen) Neuauflage von “Wonder Woman” ausgelastet. Doch 2017 geht “Black Magick” weiter.

Bisher kein dichter, raffinierter Comic. Aber ein einladender! Wer Rucka kennt, weiß: Seine Reihen werden schnell tiefer, klüger, dunkler.

.

19. Arcadia
Autor: Alex Paknadel, Zeichner: Eric Scott Pfeiffer
Boom! Studios, Mai 2015 bis Februar 2016.
8 Hefte in einem Sammelband, abgeschlossen.

19-arcadia

“The Matrix, but better”, lobten Kritiker dieses Polit- und Cyberpunk-Drama über eine Familie, zerrissen zwischen der Kunstwelt Arcadia und der verwüsteten Erde: Ein Virus tötete sieben Milliarden Menschen – doch das Bewusstsein von vier Milliarden davon konnte in ein Netzwerk übertragen werden. Dort lebt die Oberschicht wie in einem grenzenlos bizarren Videospiel, mit Superkräften und allen Gestaltungsmöglichkeiten. Arbeiter dagegen haben nicht einmal genügend Rechenleistung, um sich Gesichter und Haut animieren zu lassen.

Lee Pepper sah seine Familie sterben; und bewacht seitdem ein Rechenzentrum für Arcadia-Daten in Russland. Während diplomatischer Machtspiele droht die lebendige Minderheit, “The Meat”, Arcadia den Stecker zu ziehen. Das Netzwerk aber hat eigene Druckmittel – und Lee und seine digitalisierte Frau, Tochter, Sohn stehen zwischen den Fronten. Leider sind die Zeichnungen von Eric Scott Pfeiffer freudlos, karg: Grandios versponnene Ideenwelten von Autor Alex Paknadel werden sinnlos nüchtern aufgemalt. Figuren und Konzept faszinierten mich wochenlang. Doch ein Lesespaß ist dieser holprige, graustichige Comic selten.

Ich hoffe, der Autor findet bessere Zeichner. Oder aus “Arcadia” wird eine elegante TV-Reihe: Herz, Talent, Ideen? Alles hier, im Überfluss. Jetzt fehlen noch Farbe, und liebevolle Details.

.

18. The Violent
Autor: Ed Brisson, Zeichner: Adam Gorham
Image Comics, Dezember 2015 bis Juli 2016.
5 Hefte in einem Sammelband, in sich geschlossen – aber könnte fortgesetzt werden.

18-the-violent

Viele der besten Comics wollen beim Erzählen immer auch beweisen, was Comics leisten können – als eigene Kunstform. “The Violent” dagegen könnte auch ein Film sein, ein düsterer TV-Mehrteiler, Theaterstück oder sozialrealistischer Roman. Mason und Becky haben eine dreijährige Tochter, leben an der Armutsgrenze und tun alles, um nicht weiter abzurutschen. Becky war drogensüchtig, Mason saß im Gefängnis. Nichts soll je wieder schief gehen. Natürlich geht alles schief, sofort.

Ed Brisson zeigt ein beklemmend banales Drama um einen Mann auf Bewährung, der alle Risiken eingeht, um seiner großen Liebe zu beweisen: Wir schaffen das. Zeichner Adam Gorham hält viele nichtssagende Straßen und Wohnungen Vancouvers sympathisch nichtssagend fest. Ein Comic, der an keiner Stelle allergrößte Kunst sein will. Doch der gerade deshalb überzeugt:

Einfach, packend, ohne künstlerische Eitelkeiten, Schrullen. Ein großer, kleiner Wurf!

.

17. Monstress
Autorin: Marjorie Liu, Zeichnerin: Sana Takeda
Image Comics, seit November 2015.
8+ Hefte, bisher ein Sammelband, wird fortgesetzt.

17-monstress

Eine recht konventionelle Fantasy-Saga. Mit Kostümdesign und Architektur, so kunstvoll, dass alle Stärken der Reihe daneben zu Schwächen werden: Figuren? Plot? Solide. Doch erst die vielen Details (Zeichnerin: Sana Takeda) machen “Monstress” lesenswert. Einzelgängerin Maika trägt ein Monster in sich. Zwei reiche Hochkulturen führen Krieg. Beide halten sich für moralisch überlegen, aber sind zu jedem Tiefschlag fähig. Während Maikas Gegner für sich entscheiden: “Der Zweck heiligt die Mittel”, versucht die Außenseiterin, auch die schwächsten, taktisch unwichtigsten Leben zu schützen.

Ich brauchte gut 100 Seiten, um die Geschichte unter den barocken Steampunk- und Jugendstil-Klischees ernst zu nehmen. Zu viele Ideen hier wirken altbekannt. Der Rest zu oft verzweifelt möchtegern-originell. Tolle Kostüme und Architektur allein werden nicht entscheiden können, ob sich die Reihe lohnt: Wie klug, wie bitter werden Maikas Zwickmühlen weiter gedacht?

Politisch, psychologisch, grandios detailverliebt – oder doch nur Schauwerte, Kitsch, Effekte? Ich schwanke.

.

16. Prez
Autor: Mark Russell, Zeichner: Ben Caldwell
DC Comics, Juni bis Dezember 2015.
Als zwölfteilige Heftreihe geplant, doch nach sechs Heften (in einem Sammelband) abgesetzt; sehr gute Kritiken, deshalb steht die Möglichkeit einer Fortsetzung im Raum.

16-prez

Ein Teenager als US-Präsident: 1973 zeigte ein albernes DC-Comic im “Richie Rich”-Stil fünf kurze Hefte lang, wie ein frecher Schüler das Establishment düpiert. 2015 gab es ein Remake über die junge Fast-Food-Angestellte Beth Ross, die via Twitter versehentlich zum Star wird, dann durch parteipolitische Intrigen Präsidentin. Trotz bester Kritiken las ich die Reihe erst im November, nach Trumps Wahlsieg – und war bestürzt, begeistert, fassungslos: der Comic der Stunde, schon wieder abgesetzt, wegen schlechter Verkaufszahlen.

“Prez” nutzt Klischees über die Generation Y, setzt raffinierte Spitzen gegen die Macht von Konzernen, US-Außenpolitik, Erregungs- und Populismus-Dynamiken im Netz – fast alles klüger, bissiger, subversiver als die besten taz-Artikel. Doch besonders Menschen über 40 fühlen sich wohl: So frisch und jugendlich die Reihe wirkt, ihr Blick erinnert an Satiriker der Generation X, Douglas Coupland, “Die Simpsons”. Auch charmant – doch etwas harmloser: Autor Mark Russels kapitalismuskritische “Familie Feuerstein”-Neuauflage von 2016.

Abgründig, schmerzhaft, unvergesslich: Ich kenne kaum dichtere, smartere Satire.

.

15. Action Comics
Autor: Dan Jurgens; wechselnde Zeichner, v.a. Patrick Zircher und Tyler Kirkham
DC Comics, erscheint seit Juni 2016 zweimal im Monat; Heft 1 heißt “Action Comics 957”.
14+ Hefte in 3+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt. Parallel lesen: die Reihen “Superman”, “Trinity” und “Superwoman”.

15-superman

Immer wieder landen langjährige Heldencomics in erzählerischen Sackgassen – und räumen auf, indem ein komplizierter Zwischenfall (Zeitschleifen, Dimensionslöcher, parallele Welten) neue, simplere Zustände schaffen soll. 2011 hieß das: Superman und seine große Liebe Lois Lane werden ersetzt, durch jüngere Versionen, in einer neuen Welt. Jene Doppelgänger waren nie verheiratet, sind schroffer und pragmatischer; ein neuer Lex Luthor ist eher Antiheld als Schurke. 2015 strandete der ursprünglichere Superman in dieser neuen Gegenwart – in Dan Jurgens Reihe “Lois & Clark”: Er hat jetzt einen Sohn im Grundschulalter und lebt mit seiner Lois heimlich auf einer Farm.

2016, im nicht lesenswerten “The Final Days of Superman” starb der jüngere Superman. Seitdem übernimmt die ältere Version die Hauptrolle. In vier verknüpften, oft exzellenten Heftreihen – “Action Comics”, “Superman”, “Superwoman” und “Trinity” – wird dieses Durcheinander durchdacht, von allen Seiten. Es gibt zwei Lois Lanes. Kann man Lex Luthor trauen? Ein Fremder ohne Kräfte behauptet, Clark Kent zu sein. Supermans Sohn will selbst Held werden. Zu viele ermüdende Kämpfe, mittelmäßige Zeichnungen. Doch tolle Figurenarbeit, Rätsel, Ensembles und Intrigen.

Wirres Chaos? Nein: Ein Helden-Mosaik, so stimmig, herzlich, menschlich wie seit Jahrzehnten nicht mehr.

.

14. Harrow County
Autor: Cullen Bunn, Zeichner: meist Tyler Crook
Dark Horse Comics, seit Mai 2015.
18+ Hefte in 4+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

14-harrow-county

Provinz und Außenseitertum, Pubertät und das Erwachen von Zauberkräften, Feminismus und Hexerei – all das passt zeitlos gut zusammen, und wird aktuell z.B. im feministischen Hexen-Comic “Sabrina” souverän erzählt. “Harrow County” dagegen ist eine Klasse für sich: Statt ältere Comic-Käufer anzusprechen, können Ton, Blick, Zeichnungen hier auch Zwölf- bis Achtzehnjährige erreichen. Toll kindlich-zeitloses Design, toll jugendliche Ängste, toll erwachsene Psychologie.

In Band 1 wird Emmy klar, dass sie die Wiedergeburt einer Hexe ist – und am 18. Geburtstag geopfert werden soll. Band 2 bis 4 werden, trotz schlimmer Ausgangslage, immer warmherziger, differenzierter, heimeliger: Wie findet man seine Rolle – am Ort, an dem man leben muss oder will? Was kann man der Gemeinschaft geben – doch was dürfen Familie und Nachbarn auf keinen Fall verlangen? Ein Grusel- und Coming-of-Age-Märchen über Heimat, Armut, Rassismus, weibliche Selbstverwirklichung während der Weltwirtschaftskrise.

Schaurige Nostalgie, meisterhaft schlicht gezeichnet und koloriert. Einfach – aber niemals kindisch!

.

13. Detective Comics
Autor: James Tynion IV, Zeichner: meist Eddie Barrows oder Alvaro Martinez
DC Comics, seit Juni 2016 zweimal im Monat; Heft 1 heißt “Detective Comics 934”.
13+ Hefte in 2+ Sammelbänden (und einem Crossover-Band namens “Night of the Monster Men”, der übersprungen werden kann), wird fortgesetzt.

13-detective-comics

Kate Kane ist Batwoman. Tim Drake war Robin. Cassandra Cain und Stephanie Brown kämpften als Batgirl. Wer nur die Batman-Filme kennt, ist überrascht, wie viele Unterstützer*innen Bruce Wayne im Comic um sich schart – eigensinnige Stimmen in Gotham City, mit interessanten Konflikten, Weltanschauungen, Dynamik. Weil Batman selbst meist wortkarg, kalt, paranoid bleibt, leuchten solche Konstrastfiguren. Doch in den großen monatlichen Heftreihen, “Batman” und “Detective Comics”, werden sie meist ignoriert, und ihre eigenen Serien (Ausnahme: “Batwoman” und Stephanie Browns “Batgirl”) bleiben zu oft zweitklassig, nebensächlich.

Autor James Tynion liebt die “Bat-Family”, gab vielen Figuren schon in “Batman Eternal” eine bessere Bühne. Sein Neustart bei “Detective Comics” ist ein Fest, ein Schachspiel, ein Charakter-Drama, in dem nicht nur Bruce glänzen darf, sondern endlich auch die vielen heimlichen oder unbekannteren Helden.

Große Auftritte – und ein Miteinander, das ich mir als Fan seit fast zehn Jahren wünsche!

.

12. The Fix
Autor: Nick Spencer, Zeichner: Steve Lieber
Image Comics, seit April 2016.
6+ Hefte in mindestens 2 Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

12-the-fix

Bitter wie “Fight Club”, und zynischer, unverschämter als jede Hochstapler- oder Buddy-Cop-Komödie, die ich kenne: Roy und Mac sind die lustlosesten, nachlässigsten Polizisten der Welt. Nebenher schmuggeln sie Drogen, überfallen Rentner. Doch auch das bemerkenswert schlampig, lapidar. Immer wieder sterben Menschen. Besonders tragisch, dringlich, spannend wird das nie. Fressen oder gefressen werden? Leben und leben lassen? Egal: Wozu groß reflektieren?

“The Fix” warf mich um. Weil Krimis die Ermittler oft als Idealisten zeigen, die Gauner als virtuose, ehrenvolle Künstler. Roy und Mac sind Stümper, die einfach keinen Bock haben, sich Mühe zu machen mit anderen Menschen – doch die dafür von Autor Nick Spencer nie besonders in die Ecke gedrängt oder bestraft werden: “The Fix” fragt nicht nach Moral, Verpflichtung. Sondern zeigt, wie man arbeitet – sobald man jeden Ehrgeiz verloren hat.

Krimi? Nein. Ein aggressiv lässiges Portrait zweier Nihilisten, denen ganz Los Angeles am Arsch vorbei geht.

.

11. Nailbiter
Autor: Joshua Williamson, Zeichner: Mike Henderson
Image Comics, seit Mai 2014.
27+ Hefte in 5+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

11-nailbiter

Geniale Autorinnen und Autoren? Unbezahlbar! Doch was ist mit den nüchtern kompetenten Genre-Handwerkern, Story-Ingenieuren, Fließband-Erzählern, Routiniers? Seit 25 Heften liebe ich die simple, packende Erzählweise von Joshua Williamson – an dessen Arbeit nichts besonders tief, markant, klug, ambitioniert wirkt. Doch bei dem alles wunderbar spannend, kompetent vor sich hin schnurrt: knallige Cliffhanger, schnippische Dialoge, klare Figuren.

Es geht um Buckaroo, einen kleinen Ort im regnerischen Oregon, aus dessen Bevölkerung aus unerklärten Gründen immer neue Serienmörder hervortreten. Ein FBI-Ermittler, ein weiblicher Sheriff und ihr Ex-Freund, der als Killer “Nailbiter” überführt wurde, stolpern durch immer blutigeren, absurderen, surrealen Irrsinn. “Akte X”, mit schnelleren Antworten. “Twin Peaks”, doch ohne jeden Anspruch, Kunst zu sein. Ein glatte, souveräne Reihe – ohne “Das Schweigen der Lämmer”-Ambitionen.

Viele Psycho-Thriller scheitern, weil sie schwülstige Thesen zur Natur des Menschen suchen. “Nailbiter” hält den Ball viel flacher. Doch trifft dabei fast jedes Mal!

.

10. Gute Nacht, Punpun
Autor und Zeichner: Inio Asano.
Shogagukan, 2007 bis 2013.
147 monatliche Kapitel, gesammelt in 13 Sammelbänden, abgeschlossen (2016 auf Deutsch).

10-gute-nacht-punpun

Wir kennen die Klischees: junge Männer, die sich über Monate ins Zimmer sperren. Schülerinnen in Uniform – fetischisiert, aber angefeindet. Japans Jugend, zerfleischt oder deformiert durch Prüderie, Erfolgsdruck, “toxic masculinity”.

Inio Asano zeichnet toll fotorealistische Hintergründe – doch tragisch hässliche, rotznasige Kinder. Deshalb wirkt “Punpun” die ersten drei, vier Bände lang wie eine patzig parodistische Mischung aus Rotz und Zuckerwatte: die Grundschulzeit eines Außenseiters, seine Tagträume, eine große Liebe. Die mittleren Bände zeigen Einsamkeit auf Mittel- und Oberschule, und sind betörend klug, hart, melancholisch. Im letzten Drittel sind Verlierer Punpun und seine Flamme Aiko am Ende – ruiniert von schlimmen Eltern, Pädagogen, dem System. Asanos Comic ist ein dunkler, epischer Bildungs- und Fehlbildungs-Roman, an vielen Stellen grell oder sentimental. Aber auf jeder Seite: dringlich, packend, wahr.

Ach so – und während hier fast jeder sonst konventionelle Manga-Körper hat, sieht sich Punpun selbst als läppisches Cartoon-Vögelchen.

.

9. Wonder Woman: The True Amazon
Autorin und Zeichnerin: Jill Thompson
DC Comics, September 2016
als Buch erschienene Graphic Novel, 128 Seiten; hat ein recht offenes Ende: Fortsetzung sehr wahrscheinlich.

09-wonder-woman-true

2002 bis 2006 schrieb Greg Rucka moderne, sehr politische “Wonder Woman”-Comics. 2011 bis 2014 schuf Brian Azzarello ein blutiges, aber originelles Fantasy-Epos über Wonder Womans Krisen mit Zeus und Hera. Wer klagt, es gäbe kaum gute Geschichten über die Amazonen-Prinzessin, irrt. Was bisher aber schmerzlich fehlte: Bücher für Kinder im Grundschulalter.

Jill Thompson zeigt in fast naiven Aquarellen, wie Diana als verwöhnte, hochmütige junge Thronerbin um die Bewunderung der Amazonen aus dem Hofstaat ihrer Mutter kämpft – doch an Stallmeisterin Alethea scheitert. 120 Seiten lang glauben wir, zu lesen, wie aus Diana eine Heldin, Diplomatin und “True Amazon” wird. Tatsächlich aber nimmt die Geschichte, wie in einem archaischen Märchen, eine existenzielle, überraschend kraftvolle Wendung. Als Kind hätte mich das Buch über Jahre begeistert und schockiert. Noch heute, mit 33, kann ich die Fortsetzung nicht erwarten.

Harmlose Bilder. Doch die allergrößten Fragen, Themen, Konflikte.

.

8. The Vision
Autor: Tom King, Zeichner: Gabriel Hernandez Walta
Marvel Comics, November 2015 bis November 2016.
12 Hefte in zwei Sammelbänden, abgeschlossen.

08-the-vision

Viele Marvel-Helden haben seit den 40er, 50er, 60er Jahren monatliche Auftritte in einer oder mehreren Heftreihen – und deshalb heute absurd barocke Vorgeschichten. Die Kunst der zwölfteiligen, abgeschlossenen Reihe “The Vision”? Für Band 1 (Heft 1 bis 6) spielt das Vorleben der Figur keine Rolle. Und in Band 2 (Heft 7 bis 12), sobald wir den melancholischen Roboter, sein Umfeld, alle akuten Konflikte verstehen, spannt Autor Tom King dann doch plötzlich große Bögen durch Jahrzehnte Marvel- und “Avengers”-Historie.

The Vision ist ein Kunstmensch, der sich spontan eine eigene Familie konstruiert, in die Vorstadt zieht, Alltag im “Mad Men”- oder Norman-Rockwell-Stil durchleben will. Sein herbstliches Idyll zerbricht – und was mit alten, simplen Roboter-Fragen wie “Haben Androiden-Kinder echte Liebe, Androiden-Nachbarn echten Respekt verdient?” beginnt, wird in Band 2 zu einem überraschend reifen Liebes-Drama (und: Superhelden-Duell).

Autor Tom King tut gern besonders tiefgründig, avantgardistisch. Oft gaukelt er Komplexität eher vor – durch Zeitsprünge, Montagen. Hier aber wirklich: Treffer!

.

7. Billy Bat
Autor und Zeichner: Naoki Urazawa
Kodansha, Oktober 2008 bis August 2016.
165 monatliche Kapitel, gesammelt in 20 Sammelbänden, abgeschlossen (auch auf Deutsch fast vollständig).

07-billy-bat

Rätsel-Serien wie “Lost” beantworten eine Frage, doch werfen dabei zwei neue auf – und lange vor dem Finale haben viele Fans alle Geduld verloren. Der Historien-Thriller “Billy Bat” zeigt eine geheimnisvolle Fledermaus, die über Jahrhunderte immer neuen Menschen immer Neues bedeutet – als Totem und Symbol, als Comic-Held und Maskottchen. Und als verborgene Stimme im Kopf, die u.a. das Attentat auf John F. Kennedy vorherzusagen scheint. Naoki Urazawa erzählt eine Kulturgeschichte von Zeichenkunst und Comic, von Groschenheften, Vergnügungsparks, Perfektionisten wie Walt Disney. “Billy Bat” fragt, was eine Figur bedeuten kann, über Generationen und Grenzen hinweg. Und, wo sich Comic-Kultur und Kulturimperialismus überschneiden – besonders zwischen Japan und den USA.

Ein warmherziges, überraschendes Geflecht aus liebevollen, meist klugen japanischen und amerikanischen Leben: Künstler und Strategen, Zyniker und Fans, Kapitalisten, Idealisten, Kinder, Kindsköpfe… und viele ältere Männer, die zurück schauen auf die großen Umwälzungen des 20. Jahrhunderts.

Schwer und verkopft? Nein: “Billy Bat” erzählt ein Riesen-Epos – in überraschenden, optimistischen Häppchen. (Nur bitte nächstes Mal: mehr Frauen!)

.

6. Injection
Autor: Warren Ellis, Zeichner: Declan Shalvey
Image Comics, seit Mai 2015, nach jeweils 5 Heften längere Pause.
10+ Hefte in 2+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

06-injection

Oft schreiben Comics schon schwarze Zahlen, sobald 5.000 Menschen ein Heft kauften. Deshalb können sie kantiger, seltsamer erzählen als Filme. Leider stammt Warren Ellis’ Verständnis von “kantig und seltsam” aus den 80er oder 90er Jahren: Paganismus, Cyberpunk, Hexerei, Verschwörungen, experimentelle Drogen… kein Ellis-Thema ist so crazy, mutig, originell, wie Ellis selbst zu glauben scheint – und darum war Band 1 von “Injection” ein zwar kluger, sympathischer globaler Ensemble-Fantasy-Techno-Thriller… aber eben: kein restlos origineller, gewitzter.

Die Reihe zeigt fünf brilliante (und großteils queere, bisexuelle) Forscher und Kollegen, die eine Erfindung – die Injection – in die Welt entließen, doch heute mit zunehmend monströsen Folgen ringen. Band 2 stellt Vivek in den Mittelpunkt, Millionär, Snob, Detektiv oder Exorzist (?) in Manhattan. Eine hochbegabte Sherlock-Holmes-Figur, bei der ich zum ersten Mal seit Jahren dachte: “Ja! Hier zeigt ein mindestens kongenialer Autor Methoden und Einfallsreichtum eines echten Genies.”

Ellis’ Versatzstücke, Puzzleteile sind oft nah am Klischee. Doch Ellis’ Gesamtbild und die Erzählweisen hier? Einzigartig. Unerhört originell!

.

5. Die Stadt, in der es mich nicht gibt
Text und Zeichnungen: Kei Sanbe
Kadokawa, Juni 2012 bis März 2016.
44 monatliche Kapitel, gesammelt in 8 Sammelbänden, abgeschlossen (auch bald auf Deutsch). Fünfteiliger Epilog im Dezember 2016 abgeschlossen.

05-die-stadt-in-der-es-mich-nicht-gibt

“Vertraute Fremde”, ein Mainstream-Bestseller von Jiro Taniguchi, folgte einem Mann über 50, plötzlich zurück im Körper seines 14jährigen Ich. Kei Sanbe zeigt ein ähnlich melancholisches Zeitreise- und Kindheits-Drama – aber als Krimi: Pizzabote Satoru, Ende 20, wird in der Zeit zurück geworfen, oft nach kleineren Unfällen oder Verletzungen, und hat meist wenige Minuten Zeit, sie zu verhindern. Als seine Mutter ermordet wird, erlebt er einen drastischeren Zeitsprung: Er ist zurück im kalten Hokkaido, im Winter seines zehnten Lebensjahrs, über Monate gestrandet. Eine Mitschülerin wurde damals ermordet; der Täter wurde nie gefasst.

Lange wirken die Zeichnungen zu schlicht, naiv. Band 1 dreht sich banal im Kreis. Erst spät wird klar: Hier wird eine Mutter-Sohn-Geschichte über Courage, Vertrauen, soziales Engagement gezeigt, mit vielen starken, komplexen Frauen, Wärme, Lebensweisheit und einem raffinierten Katz-und-Maus-Spiel durch mehrere Zeitschleifen und -stränge. Ich hoffe, Autor (oder Autorin?) Kei Sanbe wird noch weiter über die verzweigenden Lebensläufe und schweren Entscheidungen der Figuren erzählen.

Simple Grundidee – doch endlos interessante Abzweigungen, Chancen, Varianten. Ab Band 2 wird das zum kleinen Wohlfühl-Meisterwerk.

.

4. Darth Vader
Autor: Kieron Gillen, Zeichner: Salvador Larroca
Marvel Comics, Februar 2014 bis Oktober 2016.
26 Hefte (und das gelungene Crossover “Vader Down”), gesammelt in 4 (+1) Sammelbänden, wird mit der Spin-Off-Reihe “Doctor Aphra” fortgesetzt.

04-darth-vader

Seit 2014 erzählen “Star Wars”-Romane und -Comics neue, offizielle Geschichten mit den alten Figuren. Jason Aarons Heftreihe “Star Wars” blieb hölzern. Doch Kieron Gillens “Darth Vader” wurde zum unerwarteten Highlight (…auch einen Blick wert: die Reihen “Han Solo” und “Poe Dameron”). Zeichner Salvador Larroca liebt Blaupausen, filigrane Technik; Autor Gillen herben Sarkasmus, dramatische Ironie, Realpolitik.

Dr. Aphra, eine gerissene Archäologin, kam so gut an, dass sie Ende 2016 ihre eigene Reihe erhielt. Auch die blutrünstigen Droiden BT-1 und 0-0-0 fanden Fans. Doch trotz zahlloser Szenen, die nur die Niedertracht, Kaltschnäuzigkeit aller Figuren ausstellen, bleibt schwarzer Humor kein Selbstzweck: Wie lebt, laviert, paktiert man als wichtiges, aber unbeliebtes Zahnrad in einem totalitären System?

Statt Vader zu vermenschlichen oder zu feiern, zeigen fünf kluge, knallige Bände, wie autoritäre Despoten allen schaden – den Machtlosen, der Welt, sich selbst.

.

3. The Fade Out
Autor: Ed Brubaker, Zeichner: Sean Phillips
Image Comics, August 2014 bis Januar 2016.
12 Hefte, gesammelt in 3 Sammelbänden, abgeschlossen.

03-the-fade-out

Ed Brubaker ist großer Krimi-Liebhaber und -Experte, und will in seinen Comics oft Stimmungen und Ton einer vergessenen Ära oder Vorlage treffen. Zwei Bände lang wirkt “The Fade Out” wie eine solche Hommage – auf den Film Noir der späten 40er Jahre, “Sunset Boulevard” und Raymond Chandler, auf bittere Verlierer im Sündenbabel Hollywood, die spät begreifen, dass sie für immer Spielfiguren bleiben zwischen Studiobossen, Mafiosi, Femmes fatales.

Dass Brubaker hier nicht nur aufwärmt, spielt, wird im finalen Band 3 beglückend offensichtlich: Was als guter Comic für Nostalgiker begann, wächst zu einem Stück Kunst, das wirklich jeder mit Gewinn lesen kann. Denn statt Figuren nur als Kanonenfutter hin und her zu schieben, zeigt Brubaker die großen Archetypen der McCarthy-Ära in einer Tiefe, Wärme, Farbigkeit, auf die ich nicht vorbereitet war. Ein Denkmal an mutige, gebrochene Menschen im LA der Studio-Ära.

Gewann den Eisner Award 2016. Freut jeden, der alte Krimis mag. Und verführt jeden, der Krimis nie sehr mochte!

.

2. Invisible Republic
Text: Corinna Bechko und Gabriel Hardman, Zeichnungen: Gabriel Hardman
Image Comics, seit März 2015.
13+ monatliche Hefte in 2+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

02-invisible-republic

Verwaschene Farben. Ein passiver, hasenfüßiger Reporter ohne Esprit, Geist, Witz. Die arg pompöse Grundidee: Revolution auf einer fernen Kolonie der Erde, und eine Gegenrevolution, 40 Jahre später. Straßenschluchten, Nieselregen, brutalistische Betonbauten – als hätte man “Blade Runner” ohne großes Budget in einer Hertie-Filiale in Stuttgart gefilmt, im November 1980. “Invisible Republic” startet freudlos. Nie wirkte epische Science-Fiction prosaischer.

Doch meine Gewissheit, hier etwas ganz Besonderes, Einmaliges zu lesen, wächst: In jeder Geschichte, die auf historisch realen Freiheits- oder Klassenkämpfen fußt, schwingt Pathos oder linke Heldenverehrung, Parteilichkeit, Patriotismus. “Invisible Republic” kann das umschiffen – durch das besondere Setting: Wären all diese Partisanen und Agitatoren, Rebellen, Linksterroristen und Whistleblower in Prag, auf Kuba oder in Ost-Berlin, zu viele Menschen würden beim Lesen säuseln: “Prag! Kuba! Ost-Berlin! Schon auch eine schöne, hoffnungsvolle Zeit!”

Der blutige Freiheitskampf einer Kolonie. Und 40 Jahre später: das Ende einer Diktatur. So analytisch, pathosfrei, reflektiert erzählt, wie bei einer Erden-Nation niemals möglich.

.

1. Panter
Autor und Zeichner: Brecht Evens.
Deutsch bei Reprodukt.
120 Seiten, abgeschlossen.

01-panter

Sollen wir das putzig finden? Christine ist traurig, weil ihre Katze starb – und entdeckt plötzlich einen neuen besten Freund: ein wilder, farbenfroher, charismatischer Panther springt aus ihrer Kinderzimmmer-Kommode und überredet sie, zu albern, zu kuscheln und zu flirten. Tier und Mensch, Alt und Jung, Groß und Klein – so innig wie Otto und Benjamin Blümchen, Calvin und Hobbes, Pete und das Schmunzelmonster.

Was aber wollen diese aggressiv drolligen Gestalten eigentlich von Kindern? Welche Balus wünschen sich einen Mogli – und wozu? “Panter” ist eine viel zu bunte, kuschelige, munter-bezaubernd-manipulative Graphic Novel über ein Kind, das umworben wird – von einem kunter-tupfig-lustig-bunten, allerliebsten… Raubtier.

Freundschaft? Nein. Der Belgier Brecht Evens zeigt die Dynamiken von Grooming, Missbrauch, sexueller Gewalt.

.

und:

Gefeierte US-Reihen wie “Saga”, “Lazarus”, “Ms. Marvel” und “Southern Bastards” veröffentlichten auch 2016 neue Hefte und Sammelbände, auf gewohnt hohem Niveau. Auch der Manga “I am Hero” überzeugt seit Jahren.

Batman v Superman: Buchtipps, Comic-Tipps, empfohlene Graphic Novels

batman vs. superman, graphic-novel-empfehlungen, buchtipps

.

Am 22. März spreche ich bei Deutschlandradio Kultur über Batman versus Superman:

Im Magazin ‘Lesart’, kurz nach 10 Uhr – auch zum Nachhören auf der Website.

.

Heute: Comics zu Batman, Superman, der Justice League und Wonder Woman.

Klassiker und Geheimtipps, aktuelle Bestseller – und Ideen für Neueinsteiger.

.

drei überraschend gute Listicles/Klickstrecken zum Einstieg:

.

DC- (und Marvel-)Comics erscheinen meist als monatliche Serien. Ein Heft hat 20 bis 30 Seiten; und einige Monate später erscheinen die Handlungsbögen als Sammelband/Trade Paperback/”Graphic Novel” noch einmal gebunden – meist etwa sechs Hefte. Solche 8 bis ca. 20 Euro teuren Bände stehen oft (halbwegs) für sich allein und erzählen eine (recht) geschlossene Geschichte.

Die “ganze” Geschichte versteht man erst, wenn man alle denkbaren Heftreihen parallel liest – über 50 pro Monat. Doch niemand hat diesen Komplett-Überblick, und weil die Reihen und ihre Sammelbände oft überraschend schwanken (z.B. auch, weil Zeichner*innen und Autor*innen oft wechseln), will/kann ich keine Aussagen machen wie “‘Wonder Woman’ ist eine gute Serie. Lest die ‘Wonder Woman’-Sammelbände!”

Band 1 bis 6 sind sehr gut. Band 7 und 8 nicht mehr.

Viele der folgenden Empfehlungen haben Vorgänger- und Nachfolge-Bände und -Kapitel. Nicht alles erklärt sich sofort, und fast jede Geschichte hat diverse Vorgeschichten und Verweise auf frühere Verwicklungen. Neueinsteiger werden manchmal rätseln. Schlingern. Stolpern. Das gehört dazu – und macht oft Spaß. Im Notfall gibt es Fan-Seiten. Und sehr ausführliche Wikipedia- und TV-Tropes-Einträge zu allen Figuren und bisherigen Plots.

Ist der jeweilige Heft-Autor klug, sind auch Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman klug, sympathisch, überraschend komplex. Bei schlechten Autoren wird es schnell platt, brutal und plakativ.

Mitunter aber werden diese Figuren meisterhaft erzählt.

Hier sind Klassiker, Neuerscheinungen und persönliche Highlights:

.

batman vs Superman banner 1

Es gibt gute Kinder-Comics wie “Superman Family Adventures”. Gute Jugend-Trickserien wie “Young Justice”. Guten Comedy-All-Ages-Quatsch wie “Teen Titans Go”, “Tiny Titans” und “Little Gotham”. Und es gibt – wenige – Graphic Novels und Bildbände, die man mit Neun-, Zehn-, Elfjährigen lesen kann. Einfache, in sich geschlossene Geschichten, in denen Helden vorgestellt und stimmig inszeniert werden. Meine Favoriten:

.

1 – DC Helden

Superman Batman DC Helden

[Link] …von Paul Dini, Zeichnungen (nein: Gemälde!) von Alex Ross:

Fünf großformatige, kurze, bildlastige Helden-Portraits als wunderbarer Sammelband. Je eine – recht menschliche, gefühlvolle – Begegnung mit Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Captain Marvel/Shazam, dazu ein Abenteuer der Justice League und eine Handvoll weiterer Helden-Kurzbiografien. Ein Bilderbuch. Ein Coffee Table Book. Ein Buch zum Verschenken – und Staunen. [Hier die US-Ausgabe.]

.

2 – Trinity

superman batman trinity

[Link] …von Matt Wagner:

Eine recht kurze, etwas simple/kindische Geschichte über die ersten Begegnungen von Superman, Wonder Woman und Batman. 50er-Jahre-Atmosphäre – charmant, für Kinder und Kindsköpfe. Im Gegensatz zu Tipp 1 kein Buch, für das ich viel Geld ausgeben würde.

.

3 – Superman for all Seasons …und Batman: The Long Halloween

Superman Batman Superman for all Seasons

Superman: Link

Batman: Link

…von Jeph Loeb, Zeichnungen von Tim Sale:

Atmosphäre! Details! Charakter-Szenen! Jeph Loeb, später Autor bei der zunehmend schrecklichen TV-Serie “Heroes”, ist manchmal überdeutlich, langsam, dumpf-vorgestrig. Doch diese beiden abgeschlossenen Geschichten aus den Anfangsjahren von Superman und Batman reißen mit… und rühren. Keine Vorkenntnisse nötig.

.

batman vs Superman banner 2

Landei gegen Milliardär. Alien gegen Mensch. Kraft gegen List. Licht gegen Schatten. Superman und Batman haben viel gemeinsam – doch entscheidende Unterschiede. Drei Comics, die solche Unterschiede und die komplizierte Freundschaft der beiden Helden genauer beleuchten – mal psychologisch, mal nur als große Keilerei:

.

4 – Superman/Batman: Supergirl

Batman v Superman, Supergirl

[Link] …von Jeph Loeb, Zeichnungen von Michael Turner:

Eine Jugendliche strandet in einer Rettungskapsel in Gotham City… und sagt, sie sei Supermans Cousine. Clark Kent ist hingerissen. Bruce Wayne misstrauisch. Eine simple, aber sehr schmissige Mainstream-Geschichte, die sich viel Zeit nimmt, die Unterschiede zwischen Bruce und Clark zu beleuchten. Ein Minuspunkt: Supergirl sieht aus wie Paris Hilton – die Zeichnungen wirken schäbig, oversexed. Und obwohl die von Jeph Loeb begonnene “Superman/Batman”-Heftreihe zwölf Sammelbände füllt… ist das hier der einzige (halb-)gute.

.

5 – The Dark Knight Returns

Batman v Superman, Dark Knight Returns

[Link] …von Frank Miller, Zeichnungen von Klaus Janson

Ein düsterer, medienkritischer, energisch gezeichneter Klassiker von 1986: Batman als alternder, einsamer Kämpfer. Superman als tumber amerikanischer Hurrapatriot, eine Marionette der neoliberalen Regierung. Bombenhagel, Straßenschlachten, Punks, Slums, zynische Talkshows. Autor Frank Miller ist heute Islamhasser/Rechtspopulist. Sein Batman ist ein Wutbürger, der drischt und knurrt. Ich mochte den Comic – und kann verstehen, warum er als Klassiker gilt. Doch ich glaube, “Meisterwerk” jubeln hier nur Sechzehnjährige, die glauben, alles über dumme Medien, dumme Wähler, die scheinbar gar-so-dumme Welt verstanden zu haben: Sozialkritik auf dem Niveau der “Robocop”-Fime. [Seit Herbst 2015 erscheint eine (weitere) Fortsetzung, “The Dark Knight 3: The Master Race”.]

.

6 – JLA: Tower of Babel

Batman v Superman, Tower of Babel

[Link] …von Mark Waid, Zeichnungen von Howard Porter:

Die “JLA”-Comics ab 1997 waren große Bestseller und sind bis heute absurd beliebt. Ich las die Reihe 2008 – und bereits damals schien der Tonfall gestrig: simple Figuren (jeder hat nur ein, zwei Charakterzüge), unterkomplexe Debatten. Der einflussreichste Band zeigt, wie Batmans Erzfeind Ra’s al Ghul alle Helden erfolgreich attackiert. Bis Batman klar wird: R’as benutzt geheime Strategien, die Batman selbst erarbeitet hat – um im Notfall all seine Freunde vernichten zu können. Batmans Paranoia wird zur Gefahr fürs Team. [Ein wichtiger Moment. Doch die Idee ist besser als ihre flaue Umsetzung.]

.

batman vs Superman banner 3

Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, The Flash, Green Lantern, Aquaman und andere Helden sind – schon seit 1960 – die Justice Leage: ein Superheldenteam mit komplizierter Geschichte und, Seite für Seite: zu vielen Köchen, Kräften, Baustellen, Erzählfäden. Justice-League-Comics sind selten gelungen. Denn auf 20 monatlichen Seiten ist Platz, drei, vier Figuren zu beleuchten. Doch keine sieben und mehr. Und alle Gegner. Im schlimmsten Fall sind “Justice League”-Comics ein fades, flaches Durcheinander. Im besten Fall: ein überfrachtet überambitioniertes, wahnwitziges, tolles Durcheinander. Highlights… mit viel zu vielen Helden. Zu vielen Bällen, wild und wirr jongliert:

.

7 – Injustice: Gods among us, Jahr 1

Batman v Superman, Injustice - Gods Among Us

[Link] …von Tom Taylor und wechselnden Zeichnern.

Als der Joker Metropolis zerstört, verliert Superman alle Beherrschung – und sein Vertrauen in die Welt: Er wird Despot und sorgt für Frieden durch Überwachung und Kontrolle. Batman, Green Arrow und viele überraschende Figuren wie Harley Quinn versuchen, Superman ins Gewissen zu reden. Doch im Lauf von fünf Jahren schaukelt sich der Konflikt immer weiter hoch. Jahr 1 (von 5) ist wundervoll – eine intelligente, düstere, politische Was-wäre-wenn-Geschichte, von Tom Taylor überraschend witzig, warmherzig und liebevoll erzählt. Ab Jahr 3 wechselt der Autor, und die Schachzüge, Tricks zwischen Batmans und Supermans Gefolge werden recht beliebig. Trotzdem: die unterhaltsamste und klügste Team-Reihe der letzten Jahre!

.

8 – Justice League: The Injustice League

Batman v Superman, Injustice League

[Link] …von Geoff Johns und wechselnden Zeichnern, u.a. Doug Mahnke:

Seit dem DC-Neustart von 2011 gehört Geoff Johns’ “Justice League” zu den größten Publikumserfolgen. Doch erst Band 6 nimmt sich viel Zeit für Figurenentwicklung, Mit- und Gegeneinander, Grundsatzdebatten: Lex Luthor ist (nach den Ereignissen des nicht-lesenswerten Crossovers “Forever Evil”) Teil der Liga und inszeniert sich als Retter.  Schon in Band 7 wurde mir alles wieder… zu haudrauf. Doch hätte ich mit 13 “Injustice League” gelesen, ich hätte wochenlang nachgedacht – über diese geheimnisvollen, verwirrenden Helden, und ihre komplizierten Konflikte.

.

9 – Smallville

Batman v Superman, Smallville

[Link] …von Bryan Q. Miller, wechselnde Zeichner:

Auch hier: Ein überraschend liebevolles, witziges, charakterstarkes Mainstream-Helden-Epos. Die “Smallville”-TV-Serie habe ich nie verfolgt. Egal. Nicht nötig! Ich mag, wie viel Zeit sich Miller für Wortwitz und schöne Freundschafts- und Romantik-Momente lässt und las die ersten sechs Sammelbände (Tiefpunkt: Band 2, Highligh: Band 5), doch verlor später, kurz vor Ende der Reihe, das Interesse: Statt Lois, Clark, Lex Luthor tauchen bald alle denkbaren DC-Helden und -Schurken auf – viel zu wahllos, viel zu schnell. Eine Parallelwelt zu den gängigen DC-Reihen… die sich zu schnell an diese gängigen Reihen annähert. Nein: anbiedert.

.

batman vs Superman banner 4

Seit 2011 erschienen leider kaum noch gute Superman-Comics. Batman-Reihen dagegen werden beliebter – und haben die besseren Zeichner und Autoren. Die Serien “Detective Comics” und “The Dark Knight” blieben holprig; auch “Batman & Robin” hat immer wieder Mühe. Doch Scotts Synders Projekte – “Batman”, “Batman Eternal”, “Batman & Robin Eternal” – sowie “Batgirl”, “Batwoman” und “Gotham Academy” zeigen: Nie geschah so viel Interessantes in Gotham, so schnell, für so viele interessante Figuren. Mich stört nur, dass Bruce Wayne immer plumper als Genie und Übermensch gezeigt wird: Muss er über alles triumphieren? Immer?

.

10 – Batman: The Court of Owls

Batman v Superman, Court of the Owls

[Link] …von Scott Snyder, Zeichnungen von Greg Capullo:

Ein Blockbuster – dramatisch, düster, voller Superlative, High-Tech-Waffen, überlebensgroßen Heldentaten und wahnsinnigen Super-Super-Superschurken: Band 1 und 2 erzählen den Kampf Batmans gegen einen Geheimbund mitten in Gotham City. Band 3, 6 und 7 drehen sich um den Joker – und langweilten mich: viel Nervenkitzel, viel Blut, aber kein stimmiges Ende. Band 4 und 5 sind besonders einsteigerfreundlich: Sie zeigen die Zeit, in der Bruce Wayne zu Batman wird – und seine ersten Abenteuer in Gotham. Deshalb: 1, 2, 4, 5. Oder 4, 5, 1, 2. Und: nicht zu lange nachdenken, warum Bruce Wayne in jedem Sammelband ca. drei Gespräche über bahnbrechenden High-Tech-Gadget-Prototypen-Unsinn führen muss. #sinnlosesuperlative #sinnloseshightech

.

11 – Batman: Superheavy

Batman v Superman, Batman Superheavy

[Link] …von Scott Snyder, Zeichnungen von Greg Capullo:

Band 8 derselben Reihe stellt alles auf den Kopf. Commissioner Gordon rasiert sich den Schnurrbart ab, geht trainieren und wird zu Batman, in einer Roboter-Rüstung [im Stil von ‘Iron Man’]. Die Idee ist hanebüchen, sympathisch frech und irritierend – und ich dachte lange: Wenn ich alle anderen Batman-Comics vorher lese/aufarbeite, die Vorgeschichte hierzu sehr gut kenne, überrumpelt mich das weniger. Doch es überrumpelt so oder so. Deshalb: Einfach los! Ohne Googeln, Vorbereitungen, lange Recherche: ein seltsames, frisches, originelles Kapitel.

.

12 – Batman Eternal

Batman v Superman, Batman Eternal

[Link] …von u.a. Scott Snyder, James Tynion IV und wechselnden Zeichnern:

Seit 2006 versucht DC immer wieder wöchentliche Heftreihen. Doch bisher überzeugte mich nur die erste, “52”. “Batman Eternal” zeigt eine (schein-)komplexe, überfrachtete Verschwörung, die sich durch alle Figurengruppen Gothams zieht. Solide Dialoge, viel Abwechslung, oft überraschend gut gezeichnet: ein Mainstream-Batman-Comic, der alle Aspekte von Batmans Welt anreißt… aber kaum etwas überzeugend auserzählt. Für fünf, sechs Hefte am Stück fühle ich mich immer blendend unterhalten. Dann denke ich wieder: eine Aufzählung, Reihung, Gebetsmühle – Namedropping, Anspielungen, Cameos. Drei Schritte seitwärts. Zwei zurück. Macht süchtig – wie eine nicht-sehr-gute, aber rasante Soap.

.

batman vs Superman banner 5

Batman und Superman hatten mehrere TV-Serien und Kinofilme. Ihre Städte, Gegner, Liebes- und Vorgeschichten sind bekannt. Wonder Woman ist genauso alt – doch immer wieder wird ihr Hintergrund verändert: eine tolle Figur – der oft die tollen Autoren fehlen. Anders als Superman aber, mit dem sie ab 2012 liiert war, hat sie auch in den letzten Jahren gute Geschichten. Für Einsteiger, nur zwischendurch: Band 3 von “Sensation Comics” – charmante, kurze Episoden. Die drei maßgeblichen “Wonder Woman”-Autoren und Sammelband-Reihen:

.

13 – Wonder Woman (New 52, Band 1 bis 6)

Batman v Superman, Wonder Woman

[Link: 6 Bände] …von Brian Azzarello, Zeichnungen von Cliff Chiang:

Diana muss eine junge Schwangere beschützen – vor dem Zorn der Götter, sechs Sammelbände lang. Simple, aber stilsichere Zeichnungen. Kluge, schnippische Dialoge und Figuren. Nur Wendungen hat diese Odyssee durch London und die antike Unterwelt fast keine; und zwischen den pompösen griechischen Gottheiten wirkt Diana zu oft wie eine machtlose, zufällige Randfigur. Ich kenne keine zweite Mainstream-Comicreihe aus den letzten Jahren, die 30 Hefte lang auf gleichbleibend hohem Niveau eine schlüssige, anspruchsvolle Geschichte erzählte. Respekt! Doch der letzte Funke… fehlt.

.

14 – Wonder Woman (1987)

Batman v Superman, Wonder Woman Perez

[Link] …von George Perez (Text und Zeichnungen):

Ein Klassiker – zeitlos, aber unfassbar achzigerjahrig. In bisher vier Sammelbänden (mehr Material muss noch neu aufgelegt werden) erzählt George Perez die Anfänge, ersten Schritte von Diana jenseits ihrer Amazonen-Heimat. Alles ist überfrachtet, pomadisiert, verschnörkelt, barock. Und trotzdem so charmant, sich-selbst-und-seine-Figuren-ernst-nehmend, dass man bis heute mit Genuss lesen kann.

.

15 – Wonder Woman, “Identity Crisis”, “Infinite Crisis”

Batman v Superman, Identity Crisis

[Link] …von Greg Rucka (meinem Lieblings-Comicautor), Geoff Johns und vielen anderen:

Seit 2003 war Wonder Woman vor allem Diplomatin. Doch musste trotzdem hin und wieder in den Hades steigen, oder eine Medusa duellieren. Eine moderne, kultivierte Frau – in archaischen Rollen, tragischen globalen und persönlichen Konflikten. Rucka schrieb zur selben Zeit auch “Superman”-Comics, und beide Reihen mündeten in einem (großartigen) Justice-League-Crossover, “Identity Crisis” und, 2006, einem Knall namens “Infinite Crisis”. Ich habe hier [Link, Punkt: ‘Identity Crisis, 2005’] aufgeschrieben, in welcher Reihenfolge diese fünf bis ca. 15 Bände am meisten Spaß machen.

.

batman vs Superman banner 6

Einige Reihen unterhalten, interessieren, begeistern mich seit einer Weile – haben aber noch keinen Abschluss. Vier Tipps, zu denen ich mir noch kein abschließendes Urteil bilden kann. Schade, dass diese Bände nicht schon jetzt, zum Filmstart, komplett in Buchläden bereit liegen:

.

16 – Superman: Earth One

Batman v Superman, Earth One

[Link] …von J. Michael Straczynski, Zeichnungen von Shane Davis (Band 1 und 2) und Ardian Syaf (Band 3):

Die “Earth One”-Buchreihe erzählt abgeschlossene Geschichten in einer neuen, alternativen Realität. Weil Clark Kent auf dem Cover von Band 1 einen Hoodie trägt, rechneten Zyniker mit einem “‘Twilight-Clark’, ‘Emo-Clark’, ‘Boygroup-Clark'” – doch tatsächlich ist “Earth One” eine konventionelle, souveräne Origin Story. Wer Superman mag, wird diese Parallelwelt-Version gerne akzeptieren. Wer nichts über Superman weiß, findet sich sofort zurecht. Nicht progressiv. Aber angenehm professionell, besonders im Vergleich zu vielen monströs schlechten Superman-Sammelbänden der letzten Jahre. [“Batman: Earth One” ist ebenfalls solider, zugänglicher Mainstream – doch langweilte mich schneller. Grant Morrisons”Wonder Woman: Earth One” erscheint im April 2016 – aber hat furchtbare erste Kritiken.]

.

17 – Superman: American Alien

batman v superman, superman american alien

[Link] …von Max Landis; der Zeichner wechselt mit jedem Heft/Kapitel:

Max Landis, Sohn von Horror-Regisseur John Landis, ist ein sympathischer Nerd und Schwätzer, der u.a. 2012 ein unterhaltsam polemisches Video drehte über die “Death and Return of Superman”-Storyline Anfang der 90er Jahre. Seitdem schreibt er gelegentlich für DC – mit Respekt vor den Figuren, Talent und Lust, Erwartungen zu überrumpeln. Von sieben Heften “Superman: American Alien” sind bislang fünf erschienen. Alle haben einen anderen Zeichenstil und eine radikal andere Grundstimmung – aber alle machen Spaß. Mich stört nur, dass in jedem Heft zwei, drei Figuren genauso selbstverliebt und langatmig palavern… wie Landis selbst. Max? Dein Lex Luthor klingt wie jemand, der Youtube-Videos über Heldencomics dreht.

.

18 – The Legend of Wonder Woman

Batman v Superman, Legend of Wonder Woman

[Link] …von Renae de Liz, Zeichnungen von Ray Dillon:

Manchmal sind Comics halbkompetent geschrieben, erzählt – doch laugen mich nach wenigen Seiten aus: Figuren aus “The Walking Dead” sagen zu viele Dinge dreimal. Ihre Sprechblasen sind überfüllt, die Dialoge hölzern. Auch “The Legend of Wonder Woman” krankt an solchen unpräzisen, öden Geschwätzigkeiten. Alle Frauen hier sehen aus wie Disney-Prinzessinnen. Doch kindgerecht ist die Geschichte über Dianas erste Jahre als Kriegerin und Diplomatin trotzdem nicht: Kein Kind hätte Nerven für so langatmiges Geblubber. Solide Geschichte. Aber: uff. Kürzt diese Paraphrasen!

.

19 – Lois and Clark

batman vs Superman lois clark

[Link] …von Dan Jurgens, Zeichnungen von Lee Weeks:

Altmodische Zeichnungen, altmodische Rollenbilder, ein altmodischer – und deutlich älterer – Superman, glücklich verheiratet mit Lois Lane, Vater eines Sohnes: Zwischen 1986 und 2011 erlebten alle DC-Figuren wichtige Entwicklungen. Doch seit 2011, mit dem Neustart-Slogan “The New 52”, sind viele dieser Geschichten hinfällig/nie passiert. Lois und Clark waren (in der Realität der Comics seit 2011, auch rückwirkend) nie ein Liebespaar – und leben heute in den Reihen “Superman” und “Action Comics” spröde nebeneinander her. Autor Dan Jurgens aber bringt ihre alten Versionen, das Liebespaar von 86 bis 2011, in die New-52-Realität. Geschichten im alten Stil – in der kühleren, schrofferen Erzählgegenwart. Simpel, aber mit viel Herz. Mich stört nur, wie verhältnismäßig schwach Lois Lane agiert – als Provinz-Mutti statt Pulitzer-Journalistin.

.

.

Es gibt zwei Dutzend weitere aktuelle Heftreihen/Sammelbände, die auf den Kinofilm einstimmen könnten: “Aquaman” und “Cyborg”, “Superman/Wonder Woman”, “Batman/Superman”, “Superman”, “Action Comics”, etliche “Batman”-, Team- und “Justice League”-Reihen… doch nichts davon las ich seit 2011 mit besonderer Freude. Tom Taylors “Earth 2” hatte zwei Sammelbände lang sehr gute Kritiken (1) (2), doch der konventionelle Zeichenstil stieß mich ab.

 

Batman vs. Superman: The Greatest BattlesIm Dezember 2015 erschien der Sammelband “Batman vs. Superman: The Greatest Battles” – eine solide Auswahl und, wie alle DC-Themen-Sammelbände, grundsätzlich empfehlenswert. Persönlich werde ich schnell müde beim Lesen solcher Comic-Anthologien: Die alten Comics, 40er bis 70er Jahre, sind kindisch und träge. Und die Kapitel, die man neueren Story-Arcs entrissen hat, wirken wie Stückwerk, zusammenhanglos: Ich lese das – und möchte jedes Mal ganze Sammelbände öffnen. Statt von Fragment zu Fragment, Episode zu Episode zu springen. Trotzdem: vorsichtige Empfehlung – zumal nur Szenen ab 1986 nachgedruckt wurden.

..

Die besten Mangas: 50 Empfehlungen

Die besten Manga

Seit Anfang Februar habe ich über 500 Manga-Reihen angelesen.

Aktuelles – aber auch sehr viele Klassiker, vor allem für erwachsene Männer und Frauen.

Ein Drittel erschien auf Deutsch. Der Rest auf Englisch – zum Teil online, als Fan-Übersetzung.

.

Für Deutschlandradio Kultur stelle am 8. März 2016 im Literaturmagazin Lesart sechs aktuelle Favoriten vor: Serien, die 2016 auch auf dem deutschen Buchmarkt eine Rolle spielen.

.

Heute im Blog: 50 Mangas, die mir bei der Recherche auffielen oder schon länger auf meiner “bald lesen!”-Liste stehen.

15 Titel, die ich las und empfehlen kann.

42 Titel, die ich angelesen habe und auf die ich mich freue.

.

gelesen und gemocht – ein Ranking:

.

15: “Pluto” von Naoki Urasawa

Pluto

“Eine ideale Welt, in der Menschen und Roboter friedlich koexistieren. Doch plötzlich macht jemand Jagd auf die sieben großen Roboter. Interpol setzt den in Düsseldorf ermittelnden Inspektor Gesicht auf den äußerst komplexen Fall an – bis Gesicht erkennt, dass er selbst zu den Gejagten gehört. PLUTO ist eine Neuinterpretation einer klassischen “Astro Boy”-Geschichte: futuristische Spannung für Erwachsene.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • toll gezeichnet; doch etwas hölzern, trocken, umständlich und sentimental:
  • Ich mag keine Roboter-Helden, so lange sie dauernd um die Pinocchio-Sinnfrage kreisen: “Bin ich, obwohl nur Maschine, ein richtiger Junge?”
  • “Pluto” ist düsterer und wirkt auf den ersten Blick philosophisch, gesellschaftskritisch. Doch so gern ich es las: Es stapft in ALLE befürchteten Roboter-Kitschfallen und -Klischees.

.

14: “Ooku – the Inner Chambers” von Fumi Yoshinaga [nicht auf Deutsch]

Ooku

“In Edo period Japan, a strange new disease called the Red Pox has begun to prey on the country’s men. Within eighty years of the first outbreak, the male population has fallen by seventy-five percent. Women have taken on all the roles traditionally granted to men, even that of the Shogun. The men, precious providers of life, are carefully protected. And the most beautiful of the men are sent to serve in the Shogun’s Inner Chamber…” [US-Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • ein stilsicherer, sehr sprach- und dialoglastiger Alternate-History-Manga über ein Kaiserreich, von Frauen regiert und die komplexen Gender Politics, sobald Männer überall fehlen.
  • Ich liebte Band 1 – doch mit Band 2 beginnt eine viel zu lange Rückblende und zu viele Figuren verheddern sich an zu vielen Fronten: Nur Band 1 kann ich, für sich allein, sehr empfehlen. Ob die komplette Buchreihe die Kurve kriegt, weiß ich noch nicht.

.

13: “Young Bride’s Story” von Kaoru Mori

Young Brides Story

“Die Seidenstraße im späten 19. Jahrhundert: Die zwanzigjährige Amira wird von ihrem Clan zu einer Familie jenseits der Berge geschickt, damit sie deren zwölfjährigen Sohn Karluk heiratet. Nach der Hochzeit fügt sich Amira schnell in ihre neue Familie ein. Doch dann beschließt ihr Clan, sie zurückzufordern, da sie mit Amira andere Pläne haben…” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • ruhiger, warmherziger, toll gezeichneter Historien-Manga über Haushaltsführung, Heiratsbräuche und Hirten-Großfamilien, meist kindgerecht, oft sehr gut gelaunt und gefühlvoll. Amira ist eine tolle Hauptfigur, und die Dynamik mit ihrem (keuschen) 12jährigen Ehemann macht Spaß.
  • die Reihe gerät aus den Fugen, weil Amira zwar Hauptfigur bleibt, doch ab Band 3 oft über komplette Sammelbände hinweg andere Bräute an ganz anderen Orten im Mittelpunkt stehen: eine verzweifelte Nomaden-Witwe, ungehobelte Zwillingsbräute am Aralsee, eine melancholische reiche Frau in Persien. Die albernen Zwillingsbraut-Bände, 4 und 5, waren unerträglich.

.

12: “Homunculus” von Hideo Yamamoto

Homunculus

“Gibt es ihn vielleicht doch, den Homunculus: den kleinen Mann im Kopf eines jeden Menschen, der – so glaubte man früher – Geschicke und Gefühle steuert? Der Medizinstudent Manabu Ito bietet dem Arbeitslosen Susumu 700.000 Yen – wenn Susumu ihm ein Loch in den Schädel bohren darf. Eine Trepanie.” [Klapptentext, gekürzt]

  • Band 1 las ich mit Schüttelfrost und Gänsehaut, atemlos:
  • am besten, man weiß sonst nichts über die weitere Handlung.
  • Band 2 war konventioneller, küchenpsychologisch. Ich weiß nicht, ob ich je weiterlesen will. Für sich allein ist Band 1 ein wunderbarer, toll gezeichneter kleiner Alptraum.

.

11: “The Nao of Brown” Glyn Dillon [deutsch: “Das Nao in Brown”]

nao of brown

“Nao Brown schlägt sich als Illustratorin durchs Leben und ist auf der Suche nach der großen Liebe. Zudem leidet sie unter einer Zwangsstörung. Als sie endlich dem Mann ihrer Träume begegnet, muss sie feststellen, dass Träume sehr seltsam sein können.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • Graphic Novel aus Großbritannien über eine junge Halbjapanerin auf der Suche nach sich selbst: toll gezeichnet und viel sperriger, psychologischer, als der kitschige Klappentext vermuten lässt.

.

10: “Twin Spica” von Kou Yaginuma

Twin Spica (Japan)

.
Twin Spica, Volume: 01[mehr] Asumis Mutter starb 2010 – als die Lion, das erste Space-Shuttle Japans, auf ihre Heimatstadt stürzte. Trotzdem will Asumi Astronautin werden; unterstützt von ihrem depressiven Vater – und dem Geist eines verglühten Lion-Astronauten.

„Twin Spica“ wirkt simpel und süßlich. Die kleine, kindliche Asumi sieht aus wie Heidi, jede Figur hat ein rührseliges Trauma, kurz dachte ich: für Zehnjährige, höchstens – oder Fans vom „kleinen Prinz“. Doch Leitmotive, Bildsprache, Psychologie und Stimmungen werden so geschickt verwebt… mit jedem Band (ich kenne sechs von 16) wird diese zarte Coming-of-Age-Geschichte trauriger, ernster, klüger, subtiler.

Mut zum Melodrama: das Kitschig-Schönste, das ich seit Jahren las. Hach!

.

9: “Gute Nacht, Punpun” von Inio Asano

punpun

“Aiko kommt in Punpuns Klasse, und Punpun in die Pubertät. Sein Vater ist gewalttätig, seine Mutter psychisch labil, Punpun selbst sieht sich als kümmerliches, vogelartiges Wesen. Er will Astronom werden und entflieht in Fantasiereisen dem Elternhaus. Von ca. zwölf bis Anfang 20 durchlebt er mit seinen Klassenkameraden typische Coming-of-Age-Probleme: erwachende Sexualität, emotionale Verwirrung, Einsamkeit.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • Ein Schuljunge, der sich so sehr verachtet, dass er sich selbst als kümmerlichen Vogel sieht…
  • …wird von (zum Teil sehr albernen, überzeichneten) Figuren herumgestoßen, missverstanden, erschreckt oder verletzt. Für eine Weile bleibt das selbstbezogen-süßlich:
  • Asanos Landschaften, Hintergründe, Perspektiven und sein erzählerisches Timing sind großartig – doch mir missfallen die rotznasigen, sommersprossigen, zahnlückigen Alfred-E.-Neumann-artigen Kinderfiguren, und ich hasste Asanos Graphic Novel “Solanin”: Dort führten Rotzlöffel-Studenten unsympathisch flache, selbstbezogene Generations-Gespräche im Stil des Neon Magazins.
  • “Punpun” will keine solche Generations-Erfahrung zeigen, kein jammerlappiges, möglichst allgemeingültiges Jungs-Buch sein über Scheiß-Mädchen, die nicht zurückrufen: Punpun wird vom 08/15-Außenseiter schnell zum pathologisch gestörten Einzelgänger… und kämpft 13 Bände lang mit Depressionen, Scham, Gewaltphantasien und Sprachlosigkeit. Je kantiger (und weniger generationenhaft, gewollt allgemeingültig) die Figur wird, desto besser wird das Buch.
  • Nur ganz am Ende kippt der Plot ins Melodramatische, die Ereignisse überschlagen sich, plötzlich wirken alle Figuren schwer gestört, und alles brennt. Ohne Band 1, ohne Band 11, 12, 13 wäre “Punpun” der vielleicht beste Manga, den ich kenne. Asano hilft mir, Japan zu sehen – in großartigen Zeichnungen. Und, Japan zu verstehen – in komplexen Figuren, absurden Szenen. Wer Banana Yoshimoto mag oder Haruki Murakamis “Naokos Lächeln” und “IQ84”: lesen!

.

8: “Vertraute Fremde” von Jiro Taniguchi (ich mochte auch “Der spazierende Mann” und “Von der Natur des Menschen”)

vertraute fremde

“Hiroshi Nakahara besucht das Grab seiner Mutter, fällt in eine Art Ohnmacht – und findet sich in seinem Körper als 14-jähriger wieder. Er beginnt, das Leben als Teenager in den 1960er Jahren zu führen, mit dem Wissensstand des Erwachsenen. Er will herausfinden, was nicht stimmte im scheinbar harmonischen Elternhaus: Im Sommer 1963 verließ sein Vater die Familie, ohne Ankündigung.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • simpel, nostalgisch, mit einer wunderbaren Grundidee:
  • Ich empfehle den Manga vor allem Neu- und Weniglesern. Er ist geradlinig, übersichtlich, die detaillierten Zeichnungen zeigen das ländliche Japan…
  • …doch an vielen Stellen – vor allem auch: sexuell – wünschte ich mir mehr Tiefgang, kritische Fragen, Figurenentwicklung. Und: wie absurd, dass es eine Verfilmung gibt – in der Japan keine Rolle spielt.

.

7: “Honey & Clover” von Chica Umino

honey clover

“Die Kunststudenten Yuta, Takumi und Shinobu wohnen in einem kleinen, schäbigen Apartmenthaus und leben von der Hand in den Mund. Ihr Leben wird auf den Kopf gestellt, als ihnen ihr Dozent Hagumi vorstellt. Das kindliche Mädchen [eine Künstlerin] verzaubert Yuta auf den ersten Blick. Doch auch Shinobu findet Gefallen an ihr. Takumi ist in die Architektin Rika verliebt, die ihren verstorbenen Ehemann nicht vergessen kann.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • drei Jungs, zwei Mädchen, alle auf der selben Kunsthochschule und gut befreundet:
  • ein Manga über zwei, drei Jahre als Student, während denen Freundschaften wachsen und sterben, Selbstbilder bröckeln, erste Karriere-Ideen entstehen, Menschen sich neu erfinden.
  • “Honey and Clover” zeigt trinkfreudige, alberne, sehr extrovertierte Figuren…
  • …und bremst den Cliquen-Spaß immer wieder ab: eine melancholische, überraschend tiefgehende Reihe mit ähnlichen Themen/Fragen wie “Scott Pilgrim”, aber noch mehr Herz. Romantisch, aber melodrama-frei. Lebensfroh, aber mit glaubwürdigen, oft unglücklichen Freunden. Simpel gezeichnet, aber sehr souverän erzählt. Empfohlen ab ca. 12. Und: für jeden, der kreative Studiengänge kennt.

.

6: “Die Stadt, in der es mich nicht gibt” von Kei Sanbe

Stadt in der es mich nicht gibt

“Satoru Fujinuma wird unerwartet in die Vergangenheit geschickt – für jeweils wenige Minuten und so oft, wie es nötig ist, um Verbrechen zu verhindern. Er hat sich mit diesem Lebensstil abgefunden. Doch plötzlich erlebt Satoru eine extreme Wiederholung: Er wird in seine Zeit als Grundschüler zurückgeschickt. Damals wurden Kinder aus seiner Klasse entführt und umgebracht. Schafft er es, die Entführungen zu verhindern?” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • Der Zeichenstil (wenige Details, seltsame Augen, Lippen, Kopfformen) wirkt lieblos…
  • …und dem kompletten ersten Band fehlt Schwung.
  • Ab Band 2 aber gewinnen Figuren und Geschichte so viel Farbe, Tiefgang, dass ich mir sicher war: Das kann auch über 30 Bände hinweg glänzend funktionieren. Ein schlichtes, aber eindrückliches Setting, ein überzeugend eskalierender Krimi-Plot, ein Autor, der an jeder Stelle GANZ genau zu wissen scheint, was er tut. Und: fünf, zehn Figuren, die simpel wirken, doch sehr schnell liebenswürdig, schlagfertig, immer komplexer werden. Grundschülerinnen, Teenager, Mütter, die ich SO noch nie gelesen habe, in Mangas.
  • Mit anderem Zeichenstil wäre die Reihe Publikumsliebling, Crowdpleaser, ein perfektes Geschenk.
  • Update, 2017: der Epilog – Band 9 – ist nicht nötig… aber schön: eine gute Reihe mit stimmigem Ende.

.

5: “Sakamichi no Apollon” (Kids on the Slope) von Yuki Kodama [nicht auf Deutsch]

Sakamichi no Apollon (Japan)

.
Sakamichi No Apollon: 10 (Bonus Track)[mehr] Oft brauchen Manga-Reihen eine Weile, um Stimmung und Ton zu treffen: Die Eröffnung bleibt meist unbeholfen. Überfrachtet.

Bei „Kids on the Slope“ (englischer Titel der Anime-Adaption) war ich nicht sicher, ob ich in einer schwulen Romanze stecke, einer Pennäler-Komödie im Retro-Look oder mitten im Kampf zweier ungleicher Schüler – ein verzärtelter Nerd, ein bettelarmer Raufbold – um das selbe Mädchen. Alle (männlichen) Figuren spielen in einer Jazzband. Doch Jazz-Exkurse bleiben nebensächlich.

Nein. „Sakamichi no Apollon“ (nur als Fan-Übersetzung online lesbar) ist die Geschichte einer (lebenslangen?) Freundschaft. Die späten 60er Jahre in der japanischen Provinz. Enge Rollenbilder. Armut. Der Mut, von etwas zu träumen. Zu jemandem zu stehen – behutsam inszeniert im simplen Retro-Zeichenstil.

Ein langsames, zärtliches, schlichtes Coming-of-Age – oft witzig und zum Heulen schön. Ohne große Abgründe, Effekte, Pomp.

.

4: “Billy Bat” von Naoki Urasawa

Billy Bat

“USA, 1949: Kevin Yamagata, Amerikaner japanischer onHerkunft, ist Schöpfer der Comic-Reihe »Billy Bat«. Hauptcharakter ist eine Fledermaus, der Comic ein Stil-Mix aus klassischen Disney- und Noir-/Detektivcomics. Plötzlich erfährt Kevin, dass es die Fledermaus-Figur in Japan schon lange geben soll. Hat er »Billy Bat« gar nicht selbst erfunden? Kevin reist nach Japan, um sich für den “Ideenklau” zu entschuldigen. Doch er gerät in einen Strudel dramatischer Ereignisse, die [das komplette 20. Jahrhundert] auf den Kopf stellen.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • Verschwörungen. Religion. Selbstverwirklichung. Kreativität. Schicksal. Quantenmechanik:
  • Ein literarischer, fesselnder Manga mit über 20 Hauptfiguren, Zeitsprüngen (und -Reisen?) durchs 20. Jahrhundert bis in die Gegenwart und Flashbacks bis in die Steinzeit, ambitioniert wie z.B. “Lost” – doch viel klarer, flüssiger.
  • Ein Riesen-Panorama über das schwierige Verhältnis zwischen den USA und Japan, Kulturimperialismus, Walt Disney, Verschwörungstheorien wie das JFK-Attentat oder 9/11… mit sehr menschlichen, oft scheiternden Figuren (viele Immigranten, biracial Characters)…
  • …und einer sprechenden Fledermaus-Zeichnung – ein Totem, ein Avatar? – die versucht, die Geschichte der Menschheit… aufzuhalten? Zu stören? Neu zu schreiben? Der Thriller braucht zwei, drei Bände, um in Fahrt zu kommen. Nicht alle Storylines funktionieren sofort. Doch ich kenne keine zweite SO ambitionierte, souveräne und eigensinnige Riesen-Geschichte. Allergrößtes Kino!
  • Update, 2017: das Ende wirkt etwas überstürzt, ich hätte die Figuren (vor allem Kevin Yamagata) gern noch länger begleitet. Trotzdem: runde Sache!

.

3: “I am a Hero” von Kengo Hanazawa

I am a Hero (Japan)

“Der Mangazeichner-Assistent Hideo führt kein glückliches Leben. Ihm fehlt es an Selbstbewusstsein und Motivation, außerdem ist er paranoid und schizophren. Die Ermutigungsversuche seiner Freundin, seinen eigenen Manga zu zeichnen, schlagen auch nicht an. Immer, wenn es schwierig wird, flüchtet Hideo aus der Realität und sucht Rat bei seinem imaginären Freund. Mit der Zeit werden seine Wahnvorstellungen immer schlimmer. Er sieht eine Frau, die überfahren wird und mit gebrochenem Genick aufsteht und weitergeht. Doch handelt es sich wirklich um Wahnvorstellungen…?” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

[mehr] Die ersten 200 Seiten sind hart: Ein misogyner, phlegmatischer, recht dumpfer Manga-Assistent steckt im Alltag fest – und redet unsympathischen Stuss. Die nächsten 200 Seiten, Band 2, sind wirr: Passanten beißen sich gegenseitig, Zombies überrennen Tokio, alles bricht zusammen. Noch in Band 3 war mir nicht klar, ob ich einen Zombie-Thriller lese, über eine Zombie-Komödie und -Parodie lachen soll oder nur die Fehler einer verpeilten, passiven, selbstmitleidigen Hauptfigur zählen: eine Art „Girls“ oder „Louie“, ein Woody-Allen-Film… mit Zombies?

„I am a Hero“ ist langsam. Oft hässlich, unsympathisch, grotesk. Alle Figuren sind überfordert und distanziert. Nichts gelingt. Man schwimmt bis zu 800 Seiten am Stück mit neurotischen, fremden Menschen in stillen, bedrohlichen, verwirrenden Szenen – in denen jederzeit alles eskalieren kann.

Fotorealistisch gezeichnet. An vielen Stellen zum Schreien spannend. Ein toller Blick auf Alltagskultur, Moral, Ethos, Sexismus, Twenty- und Thirtysomething-Defekte, Versagensängste in Japan. Ein Freund las die ersten Bände und sagte: „Ich sehe da nichts als Trash.“

Ich sehe: eine unerträgliche Figur in einer unerträglichen Geschichte – die mich begeistert, überfordert, angeekelt und beglückt hat wie keine andere Erzählung seit Jahren. Vergleichbar vielleicht mit „Geister“ von Lars von Trier. Aber eben: schleppend, langsam, viel richtungsloser.

Ich bin in Band 16. Ein Ende/Finale ist langsam absehbar (noch zwei, drei Jahre?).

Falls es auf diesem Niveau endet, ist es ein Meisterwerk.

Update, 2017: Es endet leider recht abrupt und antiklimatisch: Ich empfehle, nur bis einschließlich Band 19 zu lesen, und dann abzuwarten. Vielleicht wird die Reihe irgendwann fortgesetzt?

.

2: “Bakuman” von Tsugumi Ohba (Text) und Takeshi Obata (Zeichnungen)

Bakuman

“Er hat Talent, ist fleißig und will es schaffen: Mittelschüler Moritaka will Shonen-Mangas zeichnen.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • Ein Schuljungen-Manga über Schuljungen, die alles tun, um einen erfolgreichen Manga fürs Schuljungen-Publikum zu schreiben. Beginnt durchwachsen/überfrachtet, wird aber ab ca. Band 3 dicht, warm, sympathisch, lehrreich und spannend.
  • Man lernt viel über die Arbeitsbedingungen von Genre-Autor*innen, die Arbeit in Verlagen, den Alltag als Künstler. Mashiro zeichnet, Schulfreund Akito schreibt… und ihre Freundschaft/Arbeitsdynamik wird intelligent und liebevoll beleuchtet.
  • Seitenlang geht es – ausführlich, aber immer plausibel und überraschend nuanciert – um Konzeptentwicklung und Zielgruppen, Erwartungen, Handwerk, Serien-Dramaturgie.
  • nicht überzeugend: die passiven, viel zu verunsicherten Frauenfiguren.

.

1: “Yotsuba&!” von Kiyohiko Azuma

Yotsuba

“Die Familie Ayase lebt in einer kleinen und ruhigen Vorstadtgegend. Bis Yotsuba mit ihrem allein erziehenden Vater ins Nachbarhaus zieht. Das Mädchen mit den grünen Haaren bringt die drei Ayase-Töchter mit seiner unschuldig-chaotischen und neugierigen Art in peinliche, komische und verwirrende Situationen. Und ist so liebenswert, dass ihr niemand lange böse sein kann…” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • toll für Kinder, toll für Eltern, toll selbst für Menschen, die nie einen Manga lasen:
  • für Fans von “Calvin & Hobbes”, vielleicht auch Astrid Lindgren.
  • Band 1 wirkt etwas steif, banal… doch sehr schnell überzeugen mich die harmlosen, warmherzigen, charmanten Alltags-Episoden über ein energisches fünfjähriges Mädchen, ihre konventionelleren Nachbarn und ihren Vater, einen entspannten Übersetzer.
  • Die bisher 12/13 Bände sind auch einzeln/kapitelweise gut lesbar und verständlich – und empfehlen sich auch als Kinder-Gutenachtgeschichte oder Lesebuch für ca. Zweitklässler. Menschlich, klug beobachtet, kitsch-frei.

.

.

angelesen, gutes Gefühl (kein Ranking):

.

16: “Nausicäa aus dem Tal der Winde” von Hayao Miyazaki

nausicaa

“Set in the far future, the Earth is radically changed by ecological disaster. Strange human kingdoms survive at the edge of the Sea of Corruption, a poisonous fungal forest. Nausicaa, a gentle young princess, has a telepathic bond with the giant mutated insects of this dystopia. Her task is to negotiate peace between kingdoms battling over the last of the world’s natural resources.” [US-Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • Ich liebe den Film von 1984
  • …weil er eine simple Geschichte erzählt, in einer wunderbar komplexen Welt.
  • Diese – toll designte, klug konstruierte – Welt noch einmal ausführlich kennen lernen und verstehen, im Manga? Unbedingt, ja!

.

17: “Inside Mari” von Shuzo Oshimi

Inside Mari

“Isao Komori is a recluse shut-in. He is in love with a young schoolgirl he sees when he goes to the convenience store to buy food. One day, he suddenly finds himself in the body of Mari Yoshizaki, the very girl he is so fond of stalking. The story deconstructs body swap stories by showing that an actual body swap would probably be utterly terrifying to the victims.” [TV-Tropes-Text, gekürzt]

  • Körpertausch – in psychologisch, kafkaesk… und feministisch?
  • Die Anspannung und Angst der Figuren ist schon auf wenigen Seiten SO greifbar: Ich freue mich auf ein Stück japanischen Alltag. Und viele existenzielle, groteske “Outer Limits”-Momente.
  • Update, 2017: komplett gelesen. Warmherzig, gesellschaftskritisch, solide erzählt.

.

18: “FLCL” von Hajime Ueda

flcl

“Naota is a lonely boy in a lonely town living a quiet life amidst utter chaos. His brother left to play baseball in America, and now the brother’s ex-girlfriend won’t leave Naota alone. Then, from beyond the stars drops an impish defender sent forth to stop alien robots from destroying the Earth.” [US-Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • Der Plot klingt zweitklassig. Die Hauptfigur lässt mich kalt…
  • …doch ich liebe “Neon Genesis Evangelion” und hoffe, “FLCL” ist ähnlich experimentell, mitreißend, überraschend, hässlich, gefühlvoll.
  • falls nicht: auch “Serial Experiments Lain” (1998, Serie) macht mir Hoffnungen.

.

19: “Ghost in the Shell” von Masamune Shirow

ghost in the shell

“Major Kusanagi is charged to track down the craftiest and most dangerous terrorists and cybercriminals, including ghost hackers.” [US-Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • 1999, kurz nach “Matrix”, langweilte mich die Film-Version
  • …und hier, beim Blättern, irritieren mich die Ballonbrüste und der viele Slapstick.
  • Rüstungen, Waffen, Maschinen und Gebäude aber sind so liebevoll gestaltet, und die Erzählwelt wirkt so politisch… ich verpasse etwas, falls ich das nicht endlich lese.

.

20: “Biomega” von Tsutomu Nihei

biomega

“Zouichi and Fuyu, an Artificial Intelligence integrated into his motorcycle, are looking for humans immune to N5S infection, a disease that turns humans into undead disfigured “Drones”. Zouichi wants to find Yion Green, an immortal 17-year-old girl. But then, Yion is kidnapped.” [TV-Tropes-Text, gekürzt]

  • Auch hier klingt die Geschichte abgedroschen…
  • …doch die Cyberpunk/’Mad Max’-Welt ist toll gezeichnet…
  • …und statt Krawall zählen oft kleinere Szenen, zwischenmenschliche Momente.

.

21: “Desert Punk” von Masatoshi Usune

Desert Punk

“After a nuclear holocaust, Japan, like many other countries, has been reduced to a desert. Seventeen-year-old Kanta Mizuno, nicknamed Desert Punk, works as a mercenary for the Handyman Guild between his occasional obsession with big boobs and sex, and, later, his training of an apprentice named Kosuna. Despite his flaws, he is highly professional, accomplishing his task no matter the cost.” [TV-Tropes-Text, gekürzt]

  • eine gute Balance zwischen Humor, Survival, Action und Psychologie:
  • glaubwürdige Figuren, sehr atmosphärische Endzeit-Welt
  • …könnte auch auf Tatooine spielen.

.

22: “A Girl by the Sea” / “Mädchen am Strand” von Inio Asano

Girl by the Sea

“Koume lebt in einer kleinen Stadt am Meer. Ihr introvertierter Freund Keisuke ist in Koume verliebt. Ihre Körper finden zueinander, noch bevor es die Gefühle tun. Je mehr Zeit sie heimlich miteinander verbringen, desto größer wird der Abstand zwischen ihnen.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • Wie immer bei Asano: puppenhafte, hässliche Figuren…
  • …in hyperdetaillierten, großartigen Sets und Szenenbildern.
  • Ein kurzer Manga, griffiger als “Punpun” – aber vielleicht zu süßlich?

.

23: “Beck”, Sakuishi Harold

beck

“Shy 14-year-old Yukio Tanaka’s life is changed forever when he meets rocker Ryusuke Minami – an unpredictable 16-year-old with a cool dog named Beck.”[US-Klappentext]

  • Gemächlicher und etwas schicht gestrickter Jungs-Manga über eine Newcomer-Band.
  • Viel Raum für schräge Nebenfiguren und Humor. Wirkt flach, aber sympathisch.

.

24: “Umimachi Diary” von Akimi Yoshida

umimachi diary

“Three sisters live in Kamakura. A letter tells them that their father has died – a father they hadn’t seen since he divorced and left home 15 years ago. Despite feeling indifferent about him, Yoshino, the middle of the three, and Chika, the youngest, go to Yamagata to attend his funeral on oldest sister Sachi’s request. There, they meet Suzu, their young and reliable half sister.”

.

25: “Kakukaku Shikajika” von Akiko Higashamura

kakukaku

“Akiko is in her third year of high school. Through her friend Futami, she starts going to an art class led by Kenzou Hidaka, an intimidating teacher who spends much of his time yelling at his students and keeping them focused on drawing. Akiko is initially confused by the behavior of the teacher and her fellow students in the class, but she keeps going regardless, eventually becoming the manga author she is today.” [Mangafox-Text, gekürzt]

  • autobiografischer Manga der “Princess Jellyfish”-Autorin: Kunst, Provinz, eine Schülerin und ihr schwieriger Mentor.
  • Ich bin – wie schon bei “Princess Jellyfish” – unsicher, ob die Balance zwischen Humor und Gefühl stimmt: Die Figuren wirken eher albern, die stilleren Momente zu sentimental. Trotzdem: Neugier.
  • Update, 2017: komplett gelesen. Der erste Band startet recht holprig… doch ich werde diese Figuren NIE vergessen. Eine wunderbare, differenzierte Künstlerinnen-Autobiografie.

.

26: “Mermaid Saga” von Rumiko Takahashi

mermaid saga

“Eating the flesh of a mermaid can give one eternal life. Yuuta, a poor fisherman, didn’t believe the tales. But 500 years later, he is physically no older. He has grown weary of his lonely existence, and seeks the one creature that might be able to restore his mortality — a mermaid. In the first of the linked stories, he meets a new immortal (the first he’s met in his life) — a beautiful 15-year-old named Mana. The two travel together, in search of a cure that may not even exist. The other tales are divided among Yuuta’s reminiscences of his past adventures over the centuries, and their new adventures in their quest for mermaids. Created by Rumiko Takahashi, famous for Ranma ½ and InuYasha, but far darker in tone: the terrible things that happen when humans try and seek immortality.” [TV-Tropes-Text, gekürzt]

  • “Ranma” war mir zu kindisch, “InuYasha” zu pathetisch-folkloristisch; auch Takahashis 80er-Jahre-Frisuren stoßen mich ab. Vielleicht ist “Mermaid Saga” Märchen- und “Highlander”-Kitsch. Doch die düstere Grundfrage und die Hauptfiguren sind mir erstmal sympathisch.

.

27: “Bambino! Secondo” von Tetsuji Sekiya

bambino secondo

“Shogo Ban is a college student who works as a part-time chef in a small Italian restaurant in his hometown. When his boss sends him to try working in Trattoria Baccanale, a top-class restaurant in Tokyo, Ban is determined to survive the harsh work environment. Bambino! is a 14 volume Seinen cooking manga written and focuses heavily on slice of life drama. It was completed in 2009 and has produced a sequel called Bambino! Secondo – which takes place after the opening of Trattoria Legare (Baccanale’s second store).” [TV-Tropes-Text, gekürzt]

  • Volume 1, “Bambino”, legte ich weg…
  • …doch in Volume 2, “Bambino Secondo”, sind die Figuren erwachsener und die Zeichnungen besser: ein Koch- und Unternehmer-Manga, der eine kreative Hauptfigur vor interessante Probleme, Herausforderungen stellt.
  • Update, 2017: Ich las die ersten vier Bände, und hatte Spaß. Die Figuren sind übertrieben angespannt und garstig. Aber das Milieu wird sehr detail- und abwechslungsreich erklärt.

.

28: “Bartender” von Araki Joh

bartender

“Ryu Sasakura works at Eden Hall, a small cocktail bar in the Chiba area of Tokyo. He helps troubled customers resolve their often highly emotional problems. If you ever wanted to know the history of drinks, or the chemistry of making an excellent drink-this is a must read.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • simple Zeichungen, sympathische Figuren, gut recherchiert:
  • ein junger Barkeeper hilft Gästen, neue Hoffnung zu schöpfen.

.

29: “Shigurui” von Takayuki Yamaguchi

shigurui

“Two samurai who once belonged are determined to kill each other. The series contains very little dialogue. Thanks to the stunning artwork, it seems all the more brutal.” [TV-Tropes-Text, gekürzt]

  • Die Figuren wirken oft wie geschnitzt: bizarre Marionetten oder Holzwesen. Alles ist toll gezeichnet, aber operettenhaft, barock – und dadurch unfreiwillig komisch.
  • Mich freut, dass ich mich hier auf einen ganz anderen Stil, fremdes Charakterdesign einlassen muss. Aber dreimal pro Seite denke ich “Künstler? Ist DAS dein Ernst?!”
  • Update, 2017: Ich las Band 1, doch mir ist es zu… eindimensional und fast pornografisch, in seiner Fixierung auf Muskeln, Körper, Blut, Gewalt. Keine Erzählwelt, in der ich länger bleiben will.

.

30: “Blade of the Immortal” von Hiroaki Samura

Blade of the Immortal

“Manji, a ronin warrior of feudal Japan, has been cursed with immortality. To rid himself of this curse and end his life of misery, he must slay one thousand evil men! His quest begins when a young girl seeks his help in taking revenge on her parents’ killers.”

  • skizzenhaft, minimalistisch, hastige Striche:
  • ein dynamischer, aber etwas simpler Historien-Fantasy-Manga. Ich habe Angst, dass das Genre ähnlich verstaubt und altmännerhaft ist wie bei uns der Western.

.

31: “Vagabond” von Takehiko Inoue

vagabond

“Shinmen Takezo is destined to become the legendary sword-saint, Miyamoto Musashi–perhaps the most renowned samurai of all time. For now, Takezo is a cold-hearted killer. The journey of a wild young brute who strives to reach enlightenment by way of the sword.” [US-Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • noch skizzenhafter, noch schroffer als “Blade of the Immortal”:
  • Ein Samurai-Klassiker mit viel Dreck, Hunger, Armut, Bauern.
  • prosaisch erzählt, vielleicht zu nüchtern

.

32: “Berserk” von Kentaro Miura

Kentaro Miura, Berserk

Guts is the Black Swordsman, a feared warrior and bearer of a gigantic sword. His flesh is marked with The Brand, an unholy symbol that draws the forces of darkness to him and dooms him as their sacrifice. But Guts won’t take his fate lying down. Accompanied by Puck the Elf, more an annoyance than a companion, Guts follows a dark path.” [US-Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • Der Plot klingt unglaublich abgeschmackt, die menschlichen Figuren machen mich wütend: engelsgleiche, pausbäckige Kitsch-Kinder, bierbäuchige Könige, schrankgroße Ritter. Klischees, Klischees.
  • Aber: Die Gebäude, Schlachten, Kathedralen, Monster, Landschaften sind SO originell, detailverliebt entworfen und SO wirkungsvoll inszeniert… auf jeder dritten Seite bin ich hingerissen (vor allem in späteren Bänden).
  • Wird diese Geschichte nur halb so kunstvoll erzählt wie gezeichnet: ein Muss.

.

33: “Scary Lessons” von Emi Ishakawa

Scary Lessons

Schulmädchen machen Fehler – und müssen dafür bezahlen: “Scary Lessons” ist eine Kurzgeschichten-Reihe für ca. Zwölfjährige, in der Alltagsprobleme plötzlich ins Surreale kippen. Horror-Episoden, jugendfrei und etwas pädagogisch, überraschend packend, charmant und altersgerecht – auch in Deutschland erfolgreich. [Text von mir]

  • mich freut an der Reihe besonders, dass sie im harmlosen, konventionellen Shojo-Mädchenmanga-Stil gezeichnet ist: ein vermeintlicher Allerweltscomic – bei dem auf jeder Seite fast ALLES eskalieren kann. Oft etwas albern. Aber zu empfehlen für jeden, der dunkle Märchen mag… und noch zu jung ist für Stephen King.

.

34: “Welcome to the N.H.K.” von Tatsuhiko Takimoto

welcome to the NHK

“Twenty-two-year-old Satou, a college dropout, has stumbled upon an incredible conspiracy created by the Japanese Broadcasting Company, N.H.K. But despite fighting the good fight, Satou has become an unemployed hikikomori—a shut-in who has withdrawn from the world. One day, he meets Misaki, a mysterious young girl who invites him to join her special “project.” Slowly, Satou comes out of his reclusive shell, and his hilarious journey begins, filled with mistaken identity, Lolita complexes—and an ultimate quest to create the greatest hentai game ever!” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

  • unsympathisch simple Zeichnungen…
  • …doch sympathisch komplizierte, widerborstige Figuren:
  • Eine Geschichte über jugendliche Verlierer, die glauben, einer Verschwörung auf der Spur zu sein. Ich hoffe, die Frauenfiguren sind genauso komplex wie die (sexistischen) Jungs.

.

35: “Team Medical Dragon” von Taro Nogizaka

team medical dragon

“Asada Ryutaro is a genius surgeon who’s methods have made him a bit of a renegade in the eyes of Japanese doctors. The manga exposes the “illness” of Japanese hospitals and how their system is not designed to care for the patient.” [US-Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • dialoglastige und etwas steife, aber überraschend erwachsene Chirurgen-Soap:
  • Das wirkt gut recherchiert, die Figuren glaubwürdig und mit viel Respekt beleuchtet…
  • …nur zeichnerisch sieht alles viel zu gleich aus, über Hunderte Seiten hinweg.

.

36: “Ice Blade”, Tsutomu Takahashi

ice blade

“Icy cool homicide cop Ky against the Kunashi Island Smuggling Operation: A modern-day James Bond, Ky constantly encounters mystery and adventure. Each story contains a murder, a mystery and suspicious characters. In this first story, Ky and his partner Mack work against a deadline to prevent the detonation of a nuclear device.” [US-Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • trashige, aber elegant stilisierte 90er-Jahre-Thriller-Episoden:
  • Ernst nehmen kann (…und soll) ich das nicht. Markig, over-the-top, prollig-schick. Japans Manga-Äquivalent der Til-Schweiger-“Tatorte”?

.

37: “Cyborg 009” von Shotaro Ishinomori

cyborg 009

“The Black Ghost organization kidnapped nine ordinary humans and performed experiments on them, turning them into superpowered cyborgs. After they escaped, they were given codenames (001-009) and now fight the Black Ghost organization. […] Through 2012 to 2014, a finale titled “Conclusion: God’s War” was published, adapted from Ishinomori’s drafts of a final arc. It was written by his son, Jo Onodera, and illustrated by Masato Hayase and Sugar Sato, who were assistants of Ishinomori. This officially ended the Cyborg 009 manga.” [TV-Tropes-Text, gekürzt.]

  • simpler, aber liebenswerter Manga (1964 bis 86)…
  • …an dem mich vor allem diese letzten Bände/Kapitel von 2012 bis 14 interessieren.

.

38: “Golgo 13” von Takao Sato

golgo 13

“Golgo 13, the world’s greatest assassin for hire, never fails a job.”

  • nihilistischer, überraschend trash-freier Auftragsmörder- und Agenten-Thriller ab 1969…
  • …mit viel Politik und Zeitgeist: besonders die aktuelleren Bände machen mir Lust.

.

39: “Sanctuary” von Sho Fumimura

Sanctuary

“A political and Yakuza drama/thriller for grown-ups, originally published from 1990 to 1995. Akira Hojo is a charming and ruthless thirty-something leader of a small Yakuza society. Chiaki Asami is the trusted advisor of a member of the Japanese Diet who takes advantage of opportunity to steal his superior’s seat and use it to launch a campaign to reform Japanese politics. Little do most know that Asami’s opportunity was arranged by Hojo.” [TV-Tropes-Text, gekürzt]

  • Will super-seriös, tiefgründig, politisch und erwachsen wirken…
  • …doch bringt mich eher zum Augenrollen/Lachen. Gangster- und Politiker-Klischees, unterhaltsam, aber sehr selbstverliebt.

.

40: “Tokyo Tribes” von Santa Inoue

Tokyo Tribe

“A bitter rivalry between two of Tokyo’s gangs explodes into all-out warfare. A hard-hitting tale of Tokyo street thugs battling it out in the concrete sprawl of Japan’s capital.” [US-Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • 1993 war ich 10, und las Videospiel-Magazine:
  • Ich bin begeistert/gerührt, diese (etwas kindliche, idealistisch-futuristische) Atmosphäre in einem Manga über traurige junge Kleingangster und Hiphopper zu finden.
  • Fantasievoll, schlicht, urban: eine Jungs-Geschichte, deren Optik mich überrascht und fesselt.

.

41: “Planetes”, Makoto Yukimura

Planetes

“Haunted by a space flight accident that claimed his wife, Yuri finds a job cleaning space debris from Earth’s orbit. Planetes follows the lives of Yuri and his fellow debris-men as they work and ruminate at the edge of the great empyrean sea.” [US-Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • Ich las Band 1 und mochte in den ersten Kapiteln die charmanten Figuren, den leichten Tonfall und die “Gravity”-Atmosphäre: Astronauten-Alltag mit viel Sense of Wonder und Auge für Details.
  • Trotzdem wirkt die Erzählwelt auf mich zu simpel und vage (z.B. die Besiedlung des Mondes und die Terrorzellen dort): Auch “Vinland Saga”, der Wikinger-Manga vom selben Autor, hat große Fans. Doch beide Reihen wirken auf mich, als wären sie für Zwölfjährige erdacht, nicht für Erwachsene:
  • In den entscheidenden Momenten zu seicht, harmlos, glatt?

.

42: “Dawn of the Arcana” von Rei Toma

dawn of the arcana

“A medieval fantasy. A princess with a mysterious power. Princess Nakaba of Senan is forced to marry Prince Caesar of the enemy country Belquat. With only her attendant Loki at her side, Nakaba must find a way to cope with her hostile surroundings, her fake marriage…and a mysterious power!” [US-Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • Ein Mädchen-Manga, recht lieblos gezeichnet…
  • …aber mit einer interessanten Hauptfigur in einer komplexen Lage:
  • Vielleicht eine Empfehlung für Leser*innen der (durchwachsenen) “Selection”-Romane. Diplomatie, Selbstbehauptung, Überlebenskampf in bodenlangen Kleidern.

.

43: “UQ Holder” von Ken Akamatsu

UQ Holder

“Negi Springfield, the boy wizard of the hit manga Negima!, won many battles. Now [in 2080], Negi’s grandson, a little boy name Touta, dreams of leaving his quiet village and heading to the City. But first he must defeat his teacher: the immortal vampire Evangeline!” [US-Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • Ein Shonen-Fantasy-Mainstream-Manga mit Magie und vielen Kämpfen, aber sehr soliden Figuren, viel World Building und Liebe zum Detail:
  • Sobald ich Lust habe, mich mal wieder länger in einer komplizierten Fantasy-Welt für Kinder zu verlieren, ist das hier meine erste Wahl. Autor Ken Akamatsu ist 2016 auch Ehrengast der Leipziger Manga-Comic-Convention.
  • [Fragt sich noch: Kann ich das lesen/verstehen, ohne, vorher “Negima!” zu kennen?]

.

44: “Onepunch-Man” von Yusuke Murata

onepunch-man

“Saitama is an unemployed salaryman turned part-time superhero who is so powerful he can defeat any adversary in one hit. He’s not very pleased about this, since it means he has no more challenges left in his life. But despite this, Saitama continues to follow his (now utterly mundane) dream, encountering Mutants, Cyborgs, Ninjas, Humanoid Aliens, Supernatural Martial Arts masters, Psychics, corrupt Super Teams, Kaiju, Sea Monsters and just about everything else you can imagine along the way.” [TV-Tropes-Text, gekürzt]

  • Originell, albern, fantasievoll: der größte Erfolg der letzten Jahre…
  • die Anime-Serie noch deutlich mehr als Webcomic und Manga.
  • Ich mag die Grund-Idee, aber bin auf lange Sicht skeptisch: “Dragonball” begann als sympathisch respektlose Parodie… und wurde schnell zu einer faden endlos-Prügelei. Auch bei “One Punch Man” sehe ich in späteren Kapitel nur noch Muskel-Mutanten, die Städte verdampfen lassen und Beleidigungen brüllen. Hat das Geist und Herz? Ich bin nicht sicher.

.

45: “Mokke” von Takatoshi Kumakura

mokke

“High-school student Shizuru can see ghosts, her little sister Mizuki can be haunted by them. They were placed with their grandparents in the countryside of Japan, since their grandfather knows all about the spiritual beings. The spirits that the two girls encounter are generally based on Japanese folk tales and usually not malignant, although often very obnoxious and persistent.” [TV-Tropes-Text, gekürzt]

  • Kinder- und Alltags-Episoden im “Totoro”-Stil: Coming of Age, aber etwas hölzern und verplappert. Ich weiß nicht, ob das genug Schwung aufnimmt… oder harmlos dahin dümpelt.

.

46: “Song of the Long March” von Xia Da [China]

Song of the Long March

Choukakou (also known as Chang Ge Xing, Chang Ge’s Journey or Song of the Long March) is an ongoing manhua series by Xia Da. It tells the story of Li Chang Ge, a young Chinese princess plotting revenge against the man who killed her family: Li Shimin, Emperor Taizong of Tang.” [TV-Tropes-Text]

  • Toll gezeichnete, aber recht konventionell erzählte chinesische Historien-Action-Reihe. Bei chinesischen Titeln denke ich noch immer zuerst: “Schnell zu Wikipedia. Nachlesen, ob die historischen Bezüge stimmen. Propaganda? Geschichtsklitterung?”

.

47: “Tsukikage Baby” von Yuki Kodama

Tsukikage Baby

“A small provincial town wants to preserve a traditional performance art called Owara. Hotaruko, a transfer student from Tokyo, forms a bond with a local girl, Hikaru.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

  • Ich liebte Kodamas “Sakamichi no Apollon”
  • …doch das hier beginnt sehr steif und trocken: müdes Mädchen strauchelt durch Volkstänze, nervöser Junge starrt sie dabei an.

.

48: “Princess Jellyfish” von Akiko Higashimura

princess jellyfish

“Tsukimi, an extremely shy and self-deprecating 18 year old illustrator, has been fascinated by jellyfish. To her, they’re everything she isn’t – beautiful and graceful. Then, she meets a fashionable girl…” [TV-Tropes-Text, gekürzt]

  • Eine feministische, aber etwas schrille und dick aufgetragene Comedy über ein hässliches Entlein, das in der Modebranche für Aufsehen sorgt.
  • Ich liebte “Ugly Betty”, die US-Version von “Y soy Betty La Fea”/”Verliebt in Berlin”…
  • …aber am Jellyfish-Manga stößt mich der viele Gonk (die Grimassen) ab.

.

49: “Innocent” von Shinichi Sakamoto

innocent

“During the last days of the french monarchy, the Sanson family, appointed as the royal executioners by the king, are struggling with the reluctance of the eldest son, Charles-Henri Sanson, to succeed his father. Over time, the series also begins to focus on his sister, the cold, morbid and rebellious Marie Joseph as she struggles to navigate the patriarchal society of the time to become an executioner herself, and her eventual entanglement with Marie Antoinette.” [TV-Tropes-Text, gekürzt]

  • Stilisiert, morbide, oft im Stil von Modezeichnungen und (Emo-)Album-Covern:
  • Auf den ersten Blick erscheint “Innocent” toll eigenwillig… doch schnell denke ich: “DAS ist das Maximum an Eigenwilligkeit? Brustwarzen, schwarze Kerzen, gepuderte Perücken, ‘Interview mit einem Vampir’-Kitsch?”

.

50: “Monster” von Naoki Urasawa

monster urasawa

“In 1986, Japanese neurosurgeon Kenzo Tenma was living in Germany. But one day, the guilt of primarily attending to the wealthy patients and leaving poorer people in need of his skills drives him to first operate on a child who was hurt in the murder of his adoptive parents rather than the mayor of Dusseldorf. As a result, the child lives, the mayor dies in the hands of less talented surgeons, and Tenma is demoted by his superiors and dumped by his fiancee. Suddenly, the hospital directors that demoted Tenma die in very mysterious circumstances. The killer is the same boy he operated on nine years ago, now a young adult.” [TV-Tropes-Text, gekürzt]

  • extrem einfluss- und erfolgreicher Krimi-/Thriller-Manga, der mir immer ein Stück zu grau, leblos, möchtegern-tiefgründig erschien…
  • …doch Urasawas “Billy Bat” ist SO gut, dass auch das melancholische “Monster” noch einen Blick verdient.

.

…und sieben ganz neue Reihen:

“Oldman” von Chang Sheng [Taiwan]

Oldman

“A trickster oldman, a female warrior with an artificial limb, a mad scientist and a girl who is amazing at archery fight an evil queen and her kingdom.” [Fan-Text von hier, gekürzt]

  • Ich mag das naturalistische Setting: kein Fantasy-Königreich, sondern grauer Alltag an einem recht glanzlosen, beklemmenden Königshof.

.

“Usemo No Yado” von Hozumi

usemo no yado

“There is an inn that you can visit where you’ll find old things you thought were lost forever.”

  • Kurzgeschichten im Stil von “Fantasy Island”: wechselnde Figuren finden Glück, Mut, Hoffnung in der Land-Idylle.

.

“Legend of Galactic Heroes” von Fujisaki Ryuu

Legend of the galactic Heroes

“A 110-episode Space Opera originally released to home video plus a huge series of novels written by Yoshiki Tanaka that spawned the franchise: In the 36th century, humanity has split into two superpowers engaged in a decades-long war. Young noble Reinhard von Müsel fights for the Galactic Empire, whose government is based on 19th century Prussia. Yang Wen-li, an easygoing historian, fights for the opposing Free Planets Alliance: a government which resembles a crumbling, bloated 20th century democracy. In 2015 a new manga adaptation of the novels started in Weekly Young Jump[TV-Tropes-Text, gekürzt]

  • liebevolles Setting, liebevolles Figurendesign und eine riesige Erzählwelt: vieles wirkt bekannt oder abgedroschen – aber handwerklich ist dieser Reboot auf hohem Niveau.

.

“Ayeshah’s Secret” von Zhang Jin (Taiwan)

Ayeshahs Secret

“A young girl whose mother died giving birth to her. A wicked stepmother and three brothers with whom she shares no blood ties. Secrets woven with betrayal, terror, deceit, love, death and vengeance…”

  • trashige, vielleicht auch misogyne Vampir- und Gequälte-Jungfrauen-Geschichte – interessant inszeniert: Wird hier mit Models gearbeitet? Oder nur mit CGI-Sets und -Figuren? Ich kenne nichts Vergleichbares, optisch.

.

“Akagi Familia” von Tatsuya Nakanishi

Akagi Familia

“Set in a town ruled by the Oscar Family mafia, a girl named Lisa arrives looking for a man named Akagi Yuuichirou. It turns out Akagi is a local laundryman who is horrible at his job.”

  • “Leon, der Profi” trifft “One Piece”?
  • Ein Waisenmädchen und ein etwas trotteliger Wäscher in einer 30er-Jahre-Metropole:
  • Akagi ist ein Auftragskiller im Ruhestand, und Lisa will sich von ihm ausbilden lassen.
  • Standard-Shonen-Action-Märchen, recht sentimental – aber ich mag, dass die Hauptfigur ein Mädchen ist, kein Junge.

.

“Gunjou ni Siren” von Mikan Momokuri

gounji no siren

“Two cousins, both left-handed and passionate about becoming their school’s best pitcher.”

  • Baseball-Drama, das mehr Zeit im Kopf der angespannten Hauptfigur verbringt als auf dem Platz: Ich lese kaum Sport-Manga… aber hoffe hier auf interessante Freund- und Feindschaften.
  • [eine andere Sport-Manga-Empfehlung: das Kletter-Drama “Gaku”)

.

“Good Night World” Okabe Uru

good night world

“A broken family, trying to save a virtual family in an online game.”

  • ein Steampunk-Fantasy-Welt als Virtual-Reality-Spiel…
  • …und eine Familie in Trauer, die als Heldenfiguren im Spiel viel besser zurecht kommt als in der Realität: ein doppelbödiger Action-Manga mit vielen Kämpfen, aber Raum für Gefühl.

.

Serien:

.

Filme:

.

deutsche Mangaka:

Ich mag den satirischen Kurz-Manga “Generation Praktikum” von Kristina Gehrmann, http://sumikai.com/online-manga/generation-praktikum-kristina-gehrmann-119642/3/

…und bin neugierig auf “Das Liberi-Projekt” der deutschen Zeichnerin Tamasaburo.

.

in Korea: Manhua-Empfehlungen, Nickstember.com

.

Mangas Deutschlandradio Kultur

Graphic Novels des Jahres: 20 Empfehlungen

Stefan Mesch schreibt über Literatur und Comics, u.a. bei ZEIT Online, Deutschlandradio Kultur, der Freitag und im Berliner Tagesspiegel. Mehr hier: Link

.

20. Rasputin (USA)

Rasputin (USA)

Autor: Alexander Grecian, Zeichner: Riley Rossmo
Image Comics, Oktober 2014 bis November 2015.
10 Hefte in zwei Sammelbänden, abgeschlossen.

.

Phil Gelatts „Petrograd“ erzählte 2011 das Mordkomplott gegen Rasputin – als melancholischen Agententhriller. Die monatliche „Rasputin“-Serie von Alex Grecian ist ähnlich atmosphärisch, politisch, blutig-existenziell.

Der Mönch und Wunderheiler, charismatisch und monströs, allein zwischen Zar und Klerus. Volk und Armee. Spionen und Revolution. Detailverliebt. Komplex. Viele Zeit-, Erzählebenen und Wendepunkte, toll inszeniert.

Ich bin nicht sicher, ob die Reihe zu früh endete: Nach fünf Heften verlässt Rasputin – unsterblich, aber gescheitert – den Palast, zusammen mit den Zarenkindern Alexei und Anastasia. Was als historisch-biografische Comic-Spielerei begann, wird zum Jahrhundert-Panorama:

Macht, Mord, Magie vom JFK-Attentat bis in die Gegenwart. Oft langsam. Manchmal träge. Und nach 10 Heften: plötzlich vorbei. Schade!

Ein Fantasy-Psychogramm: eigensinnig, gemütvoll, klug menschlich, überraschend.

.

19. Alex + Ada (USA)

Alex + Ada (USA)

Autor: Jonathan Luna, Zeichnerin: Sarah Vaughn
Image Comics, November 2013 bis Juni 2015.
15 Hefte in drei Sammelbänden, abgeschlossen.

.

2013, in Spike Jonzes Kinofilm „her“, verliebt sich Theodore – einsamer Hasenfuß und Angestellter – in seine digitale Assistentin, das Betriebssystem Samantha. Ein Trottel, eklig fixiert auf eine körperlose künstliche Intelligenz. Die Satire macht Spaß, bleibt aber sehr didaktisch. Ein Film wie zwei Stunden Ethik-Unterricht für Dreizehnjährige.

Auch „Alex + Ada“ zeigt einen recht unsympathischen Single: Alex’ reiche, verwitwete Großmutter hat Spaß am Leben, seit sie sich einen gehorsamen Sex-Androiden ins Haus holte. Also schenkt sie Alex ein eigenes Modell, Ada. Via illegalem Jailbreak wird aus dem Apparat eine (recht bieder-flache) Persönlichkeit: Pinocchio mit Indie-Fransenpony.

Als Liebesgeschichte: gruseliger Stuss. Als Diskussion um Menschlichkeit und Technik: sympathisch, aber zu einfach, seicht. Als creepy Psychogramm eines Verlierers, der seine Projektionsfläche missbraucht: faszinierend! Die klinisch-faden Zeichnungen passen zu den kalten Figuren. Ist das ein kluger, gut gemachter Comic? Ich zweifle.

Doch er wirft tolle Fragen auf, zu Autonomie, Narzissmus, Konsum, Sehnsucht – und Maschinen, die uns „erkennen“.

.

18. Dich hatte ich mir anders vorgestellt… (Frankreich)

Dich hatte ich mir anders vorgestellt... (Frankreich)

Autor und Zeichner: Fabien Toulmé
Deutsch bei Avant, Oktober 2015. Original: Frankreich 2014.
Graphic Novel, 248 Seiten, abgeschlossen.

.

Ich liebe Guy Delisles saloppe, autobiografische Graphic Novels: Seit 2000 erzählt er vom Reisen, Älterwerden und seinen Problemen und Versäumnissen als Vater. Fabien Toulmé reiste selbst zehn Jahre um die Welt, heiratete eine Brasilianerin, zog zurück nach Frankreich – und hadert: Denn eine Tochter ist gesund. Die andere hat das Down-Syndrom.

„Dich hatte ich mir anders vorgestellt“ ist der egozentrische, naive, selbstmitleidige und träge Bericht eines Mannes, der wenig über Behinderung weiß: ehrlich und verletzlich – aber an vielen Stellen unbeholfen bis dumm. Im selben Stil schrieb Nobelpreisträger Kenzaburo Oe 1964 in „Eine persönliche Erfahrung“ über Wut, Enttäuschung, Ekel und Hilflosigkeit als Vater eines geistig behinderten Sohnes.

Ich mag, wie angreifbar sich diese Bücher machen, wie unsympathisch und überfordert Toulmé erzählt. Ein Comic für Menschen, die noch kaum etwas über Behinderungen wissen. Die aller-allerersten Schritte – und Fehltritte.

Nicht clever. Nicht „empowernd“. Aber: schlicht, ehrlich, überfordert, lesenswert.

.

17. Silk (USA)

Silk (USA)

Autor: Robbie Thompson, Zeichnerin: Stacey Lee
Marvel Comics, seit Februar 2015 (aktuell kurze Pause).
7+ Hefte / bisher ein Sammelband, wird fortgesetzt.

.

Die selbe radioaktive Spinne, die vor 13 Jahren Peter Parker biss, infizierte auch Cindy Moon – eine Grundschülerin. Um sie vor Angriffen des Spider-Man-Gegners Morlun zu schützen, wächst Cindy allein in einem Bunker auf. 2014, im „Spider-Man“-Crossover „Spider-Verse“, wird sie entdeckt, befreit… und versucht, ihr altes Leben aufzunehmen:

Eine forsche junge Frau in New York – Praktikantin beim Daily Bugle und mutige, unerfahren-enthusiastische Nachwuchs-Heldin. Kein „Supergirl“-, kein „Batgirl“-, kein „Teen Titans“-, „Young Avengers“- oder „Spider-Gwen“-Comic aus den letzten Jahren ist so einladend, schlicht, einsteigerfreundlich, sympathisch. Fans der „Supergirl“-Serie? Fans von Batgirl Stephanie Brown? Unbedingt anlesen!

Geradlinig, emotional, selbstbewusst: eine Young-Adult-Heldin fürs breite Publikum.

[„Spider-Verse“ habe ich nicht gelesen. Aber der Crossover-Band „Spider-Woman: Spider-Verse“ ist eine tolle, schwungvolle Einführung ins aktuelle Ensemble rund um Peter Parker und andere Spinnen-Figuren: Ich las „Silk“, weil ich Cindy in „Spider-Woman“ sehr mochte.]

.

16. She-Hulk (USA)

She-Hulk (USA)

Autor: Charles Soule, Zeichner: Javier Pulido
Marvel Comics, Februar 2014 bis Februar 2015.
12 Hefte / zwei Sammelbände, abgeschlossen.

.

Marvel-Superhelden sind oft vor allem für ihre Abenteuer im Team berühmt: Nur wenige Avengers, fast keiner der X-Men hat eine eigene monatliche Solo-Comicreihe. 2012 erzählte ein schmissiger, eleganter „Hawkeye“-Comic, wie die beiden Bogenschützen Clint Barton und Kate Bishop leben, wenn sie nicht gerade mit den Avengers die Welt retten. Die Reihe wurde zum Überraschungshit – und seitdem gibt es immer wieder neue, oft schrullige Solo-Experimente.

She-Hulk Jennifer Waters ist zu laut, zu forsch, zu grün, zu wild – und fliegt aus ihrer Großkanzlei. Sie eröffnet ein eigenes Büro, trifft in verschiedenen Verhandlungen und Kämpfen auf Daredevil, Captain America, Ant-Man und Doctor Doom. Autor Charles Soule hat selbst als Rechtsanwalt gearbeitet. Eine selbstbewusste, humorvolle, recht erwachsene Serie, nach 12 Heften eingestellt.

Leichte, smarte Unterhaltung – abseits vom Einheitsbrei.

.

15. Ms. Marvel (USA)

Ms. Marvel (USA)

Autorin: G. Willow Wilson, Zeichner: Adrian Alphona
Marvel Comics, seit Februar 2014. Deutsch bei Panini.
19+ Hefte und einige Gastauftritte / drei Sammelbände, wird fortgesetzt.

.

Believe the Hype! Den ersten Band „Ms. Marvel“ würde ich am liebsten jedem Menschen von 10 bis 15 schenken – oder… bis 45. Ein All-Ages-Comic, charmant, atmosphärisch, optimistisch und rasant wie „Harry Potter“.

Band 2 hatte hanebüchene Konflikte und viel (leeres, dummes) Gerede über die angeblichen Besonderheiten der Generation Y. Und mit Band 3 tauchen immer kompliziertere Marvel-Crossover und -Bezüge auf. Auch der Zeichner wechselt ärgerlich oft: Vielleicht verheddert sich die Reihe gerade.

Vorerst aber: Unbedingt lesen! Kamala Khan, Teenager, Online-Nerd und Muslima, lebt in New Jersey. Ihre Eltern sind aus Pakistan eingewandert und haben Angst, dass sie verwestlicht. Als sie bemerkt, dass sie ihren Körper verformen, schrumpfen, verwandeln kann, hilft sie in Schule und Nachbarschaft. Ein humorvoller Comic, bunter und kindlicher als viele andere Marvel-Titel – geschrieben von einer muslimischen Autorin.

Ein zeitgemäßer, sympathischer Bestseller – aber manchmal zu drollig, harmlos.

.

14. Twin Spica (Japan)

Twin Spica (Japan)

Autor und Zeichner: Kou Yaginuma
Media Factory, 2001 bis 2009.
90+ monatliche Kapitel, gesammelt in 16 Sammelbänden, abgeschlossen.

.

Wieder ein „Harry Potter“-Vergleich: Drei Mädchen und zwei Jungs auf einer gefährlichen Elite-Akademie. Talent und Potenzial, tragische Vorgeschichten. Geheimnisse. Verluste:

Asumis Mutter starb 2010 – als die Lion, das erste Space-Shuttle Japans, auf ihre Heimatstadt stürzte. Trotzdem will Asumi Astronautin werden – unterstützt von ihrem depressiven Vater, und dem Geist eines verglühten Lion-Astronauten.

„Twin Spica“ wirkt simpel und süßlich. Die extrem kleine, kindliche Asumi sieht aus wie Heidi, jede Figur hat ein rührseliges Trauma, kurz dachte ich: für Zehnjährige, höchstens – oder Fans vom „kleinen Prinz“.

Doch Leitmotive, Bildsprache, Psychologie und Stimmungen werden so geschickt verwebt… mit jedem Band (ich kenne sechs von 16) wird diese zarte Coming-of-Age-Geschichte trauriger, ernster, klüger, subtiler.

Mut zum Melodrama: das Kitschig-Schönste, das ich seit Jahren las. Hach!

.

13. Darth Vader (USA)

Darth Vader (USA)

Autor: Kieron Gillen, Zeichner: Salvador Larocca
Marvel Comics, seit Februar 2015.
Deutsch nur kapitelweise als Back-up in Paninis monatlichem “Star Wars”-Heft.
14+ Hefte und einige Crossover („Vader Down“) / zwei Sammelbände, wird fortgesetzt.

.

Kieron Gillen nervt: Sein „Young Avengers“-Comic hatte pro Heft 15 selbstverliebte Ideen – aber wenig Lust auf Plot und Timing. Seine Musik- und Jugendkultur-Comicreihen „The Wicked + the Divine“ und „Phonogram“ baden in Geplapper, Posen. Eitlem Gewäsch. Auch im offiziellen „Darth Vader“-Comic will Gillen zeigen, wie crazy originell er immer noch ein, zwei, fünf draufsetzt – auf die verbrauchtesten Ideen:

Darth Vader verbündet sich mit einer sexy Weltraum-Archäologin? Die durch Weltraum-Tempel springt wie Indiana Jones? Ihm helfen zwei Killer-Droiden im selben Look wie R2-D2 und C-3PO? Die ständig Menschen töten wollen, beim Foltern und via Flammenwerfer?

Der größte Marvel-“Star Wars“-Comic macht keinen Spaß. Auch viele Spin-Offs haben Schwierigkeiten [Link: Tipps von mir]. Die beiden besten aktuellen Reihen sind – Überraschung – „Kanan: The Last Padawan“ und Gillens „Darth Vader“. Weil Gillen eine recht einfache Geschichte erzählt. Weiterhin gerne parodiert, zitiert, postmodern spielt. Doch weniger überschnappt als sonst:

„Star Wars“ als Korsett, Gerüst, Hundeleine für einen talentierten, aber überdrehten Autor. Dunkler Humor und viel Suspense zwischen Episode IV und V.

.

12. Der Traum von Olympia (Deutschland)

Der Traum von Olympia (Deutschland)

Autor und Zeichner: Reinhard Kleist.
Carlsen Comics, Januar 2015. Schon 2014 seitenweise in der FAZ erschienen.
Graphic Novel, 152 Seiten, abgeschlossen.
.
Bei den Olympischen Spielen 2008 lief Samia Yusuf Omar im 200-Meter-Sprint für Somalia: Sie brauchte fast zehn Sekunden länger als die anderen Läuferinnen – doch wurde vom Publikum wie eine Siegerin beklatscht [Video].

Reinhard Kleist schreibt und zeichnet einfache Schwarzweiß-Comics, meist historisch-biografisch. Für die FAZ recherchierte er Omars Geschichte: Ihr Leben in Somalia und Äthopien, ihr Training und der Druck, den islamistische Machthaber auf Frauen im Sport ausüben. Beim Versuch, illegal nach Europa zu fliehen, ertrank Omar Mitte 2012, mit 21 Jahren.

Kleists Comic ist so simpel, linear, verständlich – perfekt als Schullektüre und für Menschen, die Scheu vor Comics haben oder von Bildsprache überfordert sind. Ich hoffe, Kleist – der beliebteste und bekannteste deutsche Graphic-Novel-Künstler – kann mehr und hat noch andere Ambitionen.

Doch besonders 2015, fürs Massenpublikum, kann ich mir kein sinnvolleres Buch vorstellen.

(„Gehen, ging, gegangen“ von Jenny Erpenbeck ist klüger, komplexer, besser. Aber eben: kein Comic.)

.

11. The October Faction (USA)

The October Faction (USA)

Autor: Steve Niles, Zeichner: Damien Worm
IDW Comics, seit Oktober 2014.
12+ Hefte in 2+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

.

Der pseudo-schwarze Humor der „Addams Family“ langweilt mich. Was Tim Burton „unkonventionell“ nennt, ödet mich an. Gothic Horror, Emo-Kitsch, die dunkle Romantik, die meisten Schauer-Comics? Nicht mein Fall. Wozu also eine Humor-/Action-Reihe über eine morbide Familie aus Hexen, Dämonenjägern, Monstern in einer klischeehaften Villa?

„The October Faction“ handelt von schlechten Kompromissen, falschen Entscheidungen, von der Schuld und dem Selbstekel, den selbst die patentesten, integersten Eltern auf sich laden im Lauf der Jahre. Sympathisch verkorkste Teenager, eine brutal-pragmatische Mutter und ein Vater, so doppelbödig/abgründig, dass Leser sagen: „Das ist der beste John-Constantine-Comic seit Jahren.“

Ich bin überrascht, wieviel Herz, Hirn, Schwung und emotionale Tiefe sich eine so eitle und stilisierte Reihe bewahrt: Für Fans von „Supernatural“ und guten Seifenopern.

Keine große Kunst – aber mehr Substanz, als die klamaukigen Zeichnungen vermuten lassen.

.

10. Southern Bastards (USA)

Southern Bastards (USA)

Autor: Jason Aaron, Zeichner: Jason Latour
Image Comics, seit April 2014.
14+ Hefte in mindestens 3 Sammelbänden (ich kenne 2), wird fortgesetzt.

.

Als Comic hat „Southern Bastards“ große Schwächen. Im ersten Sammelband geht alles schief. In Band 2 ruht die Handlung. Als Literatur dagegen ist die dunkle, drückende Serie über ein Provinznest in Alabama, dessen korrupter alter Football-Coach alle Fäden und Schicksale in der Hand hält, ein Muss.

Jason Aaron, selbst in den Südstaaten geboren, erzählt keine schnelle Geschichte – sondern baut Räume, Atmosphären, fängt ein Milieu in toller Sprache, Jargon, kantigen Dialogen; zeigt Machtverhältnisse und Abhängigkeiten in einer rassistischen, schreiend armen Kulisse, die ich sonst nur aus Cormac-McCarthy– und Daniel-Woodrell-Thrillern kenne… und auf deren Buchrückseite dann immer steht „mit alttestamentarischer Wucht!“

Dick aufgetragen? Nein: klug stilisiert.

Ein Krimi-Western-Hinterwäldler-Korruptions-Noir-Kleinstadtpsychogramm, zynisch, brutal, aber mit sehr genauem Blick, viel Sprachgefühl und, wichtig: Liebe zu den Figuren.

Kein Spannungsbogen. Unsympathische Welt. Aber grandios geschrieben und inszeniert!

.

9. Copperhead (USA)

Copperhead (USA)

Autor: Jay Faerber, Zeichner: Scott Godlewski
Image Comics, seit September 2014.
10+ Hefte in 2+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

.

Eine mürrische alleinerziehende Mutter wird Sherriff – in Copperhead, einem gefährlichen Außenposten. Ein Comic wie eine billige 90er-Jahre-Serie: schnelle Fälle und simple Figuren wie in „Dr. Quinn – Ärztin aus Leidenschaft“, platte Aliens und Interspezies-Konflikte wie in „Earth 2“, alles im Wildwest-Weltraum-Look von„Marshall Bravestarr“ (1987).

Sherriff Clara Bronson droht, knallt, flucht und flirtet im Saloon. Ihr kleiner Sohn läuft heimlich in die Wüste – und freundet sich mit Ishmael an, einem Killer-Androiden. Die Ureinwohner des Planeten sind Insektenmonster. Und Budroxifinicus, der gutmütige, riesige Hilfssherriff, gehört einer Alien-Rasse an, die erst kürzlich mit der Menschheit Krieg führte.

Viele US-Comics wollen zu viel in zu kurzer Zeit. „Copperhead“ ist sechs Nummern seichter, flacher, geradliniger als Konkurrenz-Reihen wie „Saga“. Aber dafür eben auch: zugänglicher, mitreißender, plausibler. Ein stimmiger, nostalgischer Mainstream-Comic:

Wer vor 20 Jahren simple Serien mochte, wird die schlichten Sammelbände lieben.

.

8. Harrow County (USA)

Harrow County (USA)

Autor: Cullen Bunn, Zeichner: Tyler Crook
Dark Horse Comics, seit Mai 2015.
8+ Hefte in 2+ Sammelbänden (ich kenne den ersten), wird fortgesetzt.

.

Mir sind in Comics tolle Plots, Dialoge, Sprache wichtiger als kunst- und ausdrucksvolle Bilder. Trotzdem machen mich „Narration Boxes“ müde – die Vierecke, in denen schlechte Künstler einen allwissenden Erzähler alles sagen lassen, was sie über Bild und Dialog nicht transportieren können. Je mehr Text in Narration Boxes, desto schlechter ist meist der Comic.

„Harrow County“ habe ich lange übersehen: ein nichtssagendes Cover, zu kindliche Zeichnungen, als dass ich Grusel, Angst empfunden hätte – und der dritte beliebte Hexen-Comic, nachdem mich schon Terry Moores amateurhaftes „Rachel Rising“ und Scott Snyders selbstverliebt-wirres „Wytches“ nicht überzeugten.

Tatsächlich ist „Harrow County“ ein Glücksfall. Wegen der blendend geschriebenen Narration Boxes! Den Zeichnungen, die zur kindlichen, viel zu naiven Hauptfigur passen. Und, weil hier ein klassischer, packender Hexe-gegen-Kleinstadt-Kampf erzählt wird in den 30er Jahren. Mit der – überraschten, nichtsahnenden – Hexe als Heldin.

Einfacher, simmungsvoller Grusel für Leser*innen ab 12. Letzte Woche wurde überdie Verfilmung berichtet.

[Mehr Hexen? Ich freue mich auf „Sabrina“, „Providence“ und „Black Magick“]

.

7. Injection (USA, britischer Autor)

Injection (USA, britischer Autor)

Autor: Warren Ellis, Zeichner: Declan Shalvey und Jordie Bellaire
Image Comics, Mai bis September 2015.
5 Hefte in einem Sammelband, pausiert gerade. Mindestens 5 weitere Hefte ab 13. Januar 2016.

.

Auf den Comic-Bestenlisten vieler Männer, die sich für besonders „hart“ und „alternativ“ halten, stehen seit Jahrzehnten drei Namen: Garth Ennis, Mark Millar undWarren Ellis.

Von Ennis kenne ich nur eine zarte Superman-Geschichte aus „Hitman“. Von Millar das fast disneyhaft süße, nostalgische „Starlight“. Ellis mag ich seit seiner kindisch-wüsten Marvel-Parodie „Nextwave“. Aktuell schreibt er auch „Trees“, einen ambitioniert politischen, aber noch arg verzettelten Comic über die Frage, was aus Krieg, Macht, Ego wird, sobald die Menschheit sicher sein könnte, dass es fortschrittlichere Aliens gibt.

Dass in „Injection“ viel geschossen und gestorben, geflucht, gesoffen und geblutet wird, gehört wahrscheinlich zur Marke „Warren Ellis“. Noch mehr aber geht es ums Altern und Beten, Wandern und Meditieren, Hoffen und Resignieren. Fünf Wissenschaftler haben die Welt verändert, mit einer geheimen „Injektion“. Jetzt, Jahre später, zahlt die Welt den Preis – und ein Dana-Scully-Lookalike über 50 humpelt und flucht durch eine mystische Regierungsverschwörung.

Tolle Figuren, verquaste Esoterik: Bisher überzeugen mich Stil, Atmosphäre, Psychologie. Könnte aber schlimmer Märchen- und Pagan-Kitsch sein.

.

6. The Fade Out (USA)

The Fade Out (USA)

Autor: Ed Brubaker, Zeichner: Sean Phillips
Image Comics, seit August 2014.
11+ Hefte in 2+ Sammelbänden, ist auf 15 Hefte/3 Sammelbände angelegt.

.

Charlie Parish ist Drehbuchautor – heimlich: Er macht den Job, für den sein Alkoholikerkumpel Gil bezahlt wird. Bei einer Party stirbt Hauptdarstellerin Valeria Summers. Charlie verliebt sich in Maya Silver – den jungen Star, der sie ersetzen soll. Während viele Szenen neu gedreht, das Drehbuch ständig ausgebessert wird, versucht er, sich an die Mordnacht zu erinnern.

Ich liebe Ed Brubaker seit „Gotham Central“. Seit 15 Jahren erzählt er immer wieder gefeierte historische Noir-Dramen um Detektive und Killer. „Fatale“ brach ich schnell ab: Was als Krimi begann, wurde zu schnell von trashigen Lovecraft-Tentakelnerwürgt.

„The Fade Out“ bleibt den klassischen Farben, Motiven, Tricks des Krimi-Genres treu: Hollywood 1948. Kaputte Stars, Auf-, Absteiger. Bittere Geheimnisse. Verrat und Sünde. Ein glänzend recherchierter, toll gezeichneter Comic zweier Profis.

Nicht bahnbrechend, ambitioniert – aber stimmig, fesselnd, smart, detailverliebt… und wunderbar traurig.

.

5. Jupiter’s Legacy / Jupiter’s Circle (USA, britischer Autor)

Jupiter's Legacy / Jupiter's Circle (USA, britischer Autor)

Autor: Mark Millar, Zeichner: Frank Quietly
Image Comics, seit April 2013.
Zweimal fünf Hefte (jeweils 1 Sammelband) sind geplant, die ersten 5 erschienen bis Anfang 2015. Danach, April bis September 2015, folgten 6 Hefte der Prequel-Serie „Jupiter’s Circle“. Hefte 6 bis 10 sind in Arbeit, haben aber noch kein Veröffentlichungsdatum.

.

Wer selten Superheldencomics liest, stolpert bald über ein Gedankenspiel: Was, wenn Superman böse wäre? Oder ihn ein anderer Held, militanter und despotischer, töten und ersetzen könnte?

Superman-Fans – wie mir – stellt sich die Frage selten. Weil seit „Death & Return of Superman“ und „Kingdom Come“ vor über 20 Jahren fast jedes Jahr zwei, drei neue Was-wäre-wenn-Geschichten dazu dazu erscheinen: Die meisten bleiben seichte, pubertäre Dystopien – ohne politischen Biss, Erkenntniswert, Dramatik.

„Jupiter’s Legacy“ handelt von einer Gruppe Abenteurer, die 1932 auf einer verlassenen Insel Superkräfte erhielten. Seitdem behüten und gängeln sie die Menschheit. Als ihre Kinder – viele mit eigenen Kräften – rebellieren und die besonnenen Alten beseitigen, entsteht ein Polizei- und Überwachungsstaat.

Millars Geschichte ist simpel – aber wendungsreich, warmherzig, mit viel Liebe zu Figuren, die sich schnell und überraschend entwickeln. Der größte Gewinn aber sind die Zeichnungen von Frank Quitely: hübsch-hässlich-knittrig-simpel-detailverliebtes Gekrakel. Eine Welt, die an allen Rändern ausfranst, Falten wirft. Auch die Rückblenden in die 50er und 60er Jahre in der Ableger-Serie „Jupiter’s Circle“ machen Spaß.

Verbrauchtes Konzept, fesselnde Umsetzung: der schönste Mainstream-Superhelden-Schwanengesang des Jahres.

.

4. Saga (USA)

Saga (USA)

Autor: Brian K. Vaughan, Zeichnerin: Fiona Staples
Image Comics, seit März 2012. Deutsch bei Cross Cult.
31+ Hefte in 6+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt, idealerweise noch mehrere Jahre.

.

Brian K. Vaughan ist einer der klügsten Autoren, die ich kenne.

Doch er ist nicht so klug, wie er selbst denkt. Und deshalb sind seine politischen, kritischen, verbissen originellen Comic-Reihen oft nur halb so clever, rebellisch, überraschend, wie sie zu sein glauben (aktuell: der selbstverliebte, recht trashige USA-gegen-Kanada-Kriegscomic „We stand on Guard“).

„Saga“ stieß mich anfangs ab – weil es sich las, als glaube Vaughan wieder, ALLEN alles beweisen zu müssen: eine Space Opera voller Verfolgungsjagden, Verräter, Explosionen. Ein Liebespaar wie aus „Romeo und Julia“, gerade Eltern geworden. Raumschiffe aus Holz, die in Wäldern wachsen. Roboter-Monarchien. Robbenwesen, Spinnenwesen, Geister-Babysitter und ein Zyklop, der Kitschromane schreibt und aussieht wie Ernest Hemingway. Uff.

Unter dem verbissen originellen (aber toll gezeichneten!) postmodernen Mash-Up-Plunder geht es um Krieg und Elternschaft – und Weisheiten über den Kosmos und das Leben, die auch aus einer „Brigitte“-Kolumne stammen könnten.

Dass ich „Saga“ trotz dieser Ticks und Eitelkeiten nach über drei Jahren Mitfiebern und Lesen liebe, bemerkte ich vor drei Monaten: Ich las den offiziellen „Star Wars“-Comic. Und dachte: Was für eine fade, bemühte, abgeschmackte „Saga“-Kopie. [Im Ernst: Link!]

„Saga“ kann Space Opera im 21. Jahrhundert besser.

(…sage ich keine Woche vor der „Star Wars 7“-Premiere. Mal sehen, wer danach führt!)

.

3. Sakamichi no Apollon (Japan)

Sakamichi no Apollon (Japan)

Autorin und Zeichnerin: Yuki Kodama
Shogakukan, 2007 bis 2012, keine deutsche Version.
50 monatliche Kapitel, gesammelt in 10 Sammelbänden (der letzte Band: Epilog), abgeschlossen.

.

Im August las ich die ersten Seiten von über 150 Mangas – und merkte: Oft brauchen sie viel länger, um Stimmung und Ton zu treffen. Die Eröffnung bleibt meist unbeholfen. Überfrachtet.

Bei „Kids on the Slope“ (englischer Titel der Anime-Adaption) war ich nicht sicher, ob ich in einer schwulen Romanze stecke, einer Pennäler-Komödie im Retro-Look oder mitten im Kampf zweier ungleicher Schüler – ein verzärtelter Nerd, ein bettelarmer Raufbold – um das selbe Mädchen. Alle (männlichen) Figuren spielen in einer Jazzband. Doch Jazz-Exkurse bleiben nebensächlich.

Nein. „Sakamichi no Apollon“ (nur als Fan-Übersetzung online lesbar) ist die Geschichte einer (lebenslangen?) Freundschaft. Die späten 60er Jahre in der japanischen Provinz. Enge Rollenbilder. Armut. Der Mut, von etwas zu träumen. Zu jemandem zu stehen – behutsam inszeniert im simplen Retro-Zeichenstil.

Ein langsames, zärtliches, schlichtes Coming-of-Age – oft witzig und zum Heulen schön. Ohne große Abgründe, Effekte, Pomp.

.

2. Lazarus (USA)

Lazarus (USA)

Autor: Greg Rucka, Zeichner: Michael Lark
Image Comics, seit Juli 2013.
21+ Hefte in 4+ Sammelbänden (ich kenne drei), wird fortgesetzt.

.

Greg Rucka ist mein Lieblings-Comicautor – und „Lazarus“ hat, als vielleicht erste Rucka-Reihe, das Potenzial zum Mainstream-Erfolg. Eine TV-Serie ist in Planung:

Im späten 21. Jahrhundert wird die Welt von familiengeführten Konzernen beherrscht: neofeudale Clans, die ein paar Menschen als Leibeigene benutzen und versorgen (Kategorie „Serv“), den Rest aber in Reservaten und als Kleinbauern sterben lassen (Kategorie „Waste“).

Konflikte zwischen Familien werden in ritualisierten Kämpfen ausgetragen: Jeder Clan hat einen „Lazarus“, ein optimiertes (künstliches?) Wesen, das trainiert wurde, um Duelle auszutragen, Gegner einzuschüchtern und diplomatisch zu verhandeln. Die junge Forever ist Tochter und Lazarus des amerikanischen Carlyle-Clans. Während die Familie von allen Seiten attackiert wird, hinterfragt sie ihre Rolle als Waffe.

Rucka und Lark waren schon in „Gotham Central“ großartig. Eine leidenschaftliche, psychologisch stimmige Dystopie mit unvergesslichen Figuren. Harten Entscheidungen. Endlosen Dilemma. Dilemmas? Dilemmata?

Erwachsener als „Hunger Games“. Packender als „The Walking Dead“.

.

1. I am a Hero (Japan)

I am a Hero (Japan)

Autor und Zeichner: Kengo Hanazawa
Shogakukan seit 2009, Deutsch bei Carlsen Comics.
200+ Kapitel in 18+ Sammelbänden, wird fortgesetzt.

.

Die ersten 200 Seiten sind hart: Ein misogyner, phlegmatischer, recht dumpfer Manga-Assistent steckt im Alltag fest – und redet unsympathischen Stuss. Die nächsten 200 Seiten, Band 2, sind wirr: Passanten beißen sich gegenseitig, Zombies überrennen Tokio, alles bricht zusammen. Noch in Band 3 war mir nicht klar, ob ich einen Zombie-Thriller lese, über eine Zombie-Komödie und -Parodie lachen soll oder nur die Fehler einer verpeilten, passiven, selbstmitleidigen Hauptfigur zählen: eine Art „Girls“ oder „Louie“, ein Woody-Allen-Film… mit Zombies?

„I am a Hero“ ist langsam. Oft hässlich, unsympathisch, grotesk. Alle Figuren sind überfordert und distanziert. Nichts gelingt. Man schwimmt bis zu 800 Seiten am Stück mit neurotischen, fremden Menschen in stillen, bedrohlichen, verwirrenden Szenen – in denen jederzeit alles eskalieren kann.

Fotorealistisch gezeichnet. An vielen Stellen zum Schreien spannend. Ein toller Blick auf Alltagskultur, Moral, Ethos, Sexismus, Twenty- und Thirtysomething-Defekte, Versagensängste in Japan. Ein Freund las die ersten Bände und sagte „Ich sehe da nichts als Trash.“

Ich sehe: eine unerträgliche Figur in einer unerträglichen Geschichte – die mich begeistert, überfordert, angeekelt und beglückt hat wie keine andere Erzählung seit Jahren. Vergleichbar vielleicht mit „Geister“ von Lars von Trier. Aber eben: schleppend, langsam, viel richtungsloser.

Ich bin in Band 16. Ein Ende/Finale ist langsam absehbar (noch zwei, drei Jahre?).

Wenn es auf diesem Niveau endet, ist es ein Meisterwerk.

.

Der Trailer zur “I am a Hero”-Verfilmung, 2016:

.

…zu rasant, zu komödiantisch, zu locker, zu sommerlich:

Der Manga ist stiller und… verzweifelter. Aber die “Soll ich lachen, schreien, weinen?”-Stimmung die selbe. Der Hauptdarsteller passt perfekt.