Die besten Bücher von Frauen: Literatur, 2016

neue Bücher 2016

.

Jedes Jahr lese ich die ersten Seiten von ca. 3000 Romanen: Klassiker und Geheimtipps, Literatur und Unterhaltung… und möglichst viele Neuerscheinungen, auf Deutsch und Englisch.

Viele Bücher, deren Leseproben mich überzeugten, stelle ich in kurzen Listen vor – zuletzt zu Themen wie “Jugendbücher 2016”, “Literatur zu Flucht, Krieg und Vertreibung”, “Krimis 2016” oder “feministische Science-Fiction”.

Heute – sehr weit gefasst, aber nicht wahllos:

zehn Bücher von Frauen, erschienen 2016 – angelesen, vorgemerkt, gemocht.

.

Zum Einstieg:

6 aktuelle Bücher von Frauen, die ich komplett las – und sehr empfehlen kann.

Adieu, mein Kind Schnell, dein Leben Nach einer wahren Geschichte: Roman Liebe ist nicht genug - Ich bin die Mutter eines Amokläufers Der Pfau Ms. Marvel, Vol. 1: No Normal

.

zehn englischsprachige Titel – angelesen und gemocht:

.

01: Zadie Smith, “Swing Time”

  • 453 Seiten, November 2016, Großbritannien
  • Seit fast 15 Jahren lese ich Bücher von Smith an – und lege sie zur Seite, weil sie mir zu bürgerlich-britisch-gesetzt scheinen. Hier fesseln/überzeugen mich die ersten Seiten: ambitionierte Frauen, und eine komplizierte Freundschaft.

“Two brown girls dream of being dancers – but only one, Tracey, has talent. The other has ideas: about rhythm and time, about black bodies and black music. A close but complicated childhood friendship that ends abruptly in their early twenties. Moving from North-West London to West Africa, Swing Time is an exuberant dance to the music of time.” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Swing Time
.

02: Alice Hoffman, “Faithful”
  • 258 Seiten, November 2016, USA
  • Klingt nach schlimmem Kitsch: ein Engel? Aber: hoher Ton, magischer Realismus, vielleicht ein klug existenzieller Mainstream-Schmöker.

“Growing up on Long Island, an extraordinary tragedy changes Shelby Richmond’s fate. Her best friend’s future is destroyed in an accident, while Shelby walks away with the burden of guilt and has to fight her way back to her own future. In New York City she finds a circle of lost and found souls—including an angel who’s been watching over her.” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Faithful

.

03: Rachel Cusk, “Transit”

  • 272 Seiten, September 2016, Großbritannien
  • Band 1 der Trilogie war mir zu trocken. Doch ich mag die Idee, über die Zeit nach einer Trennung zu schreiben – nicht vor allem über das Zerbrechen der Ehe zuvor.

“The stunning second novel of a trilogy that began with Outline (2015): In the wake of family collapse, a writer and her two young sons move to London. A penetrating and moving reflection on childhood and fate, the value of suffering and the moral problems of personal responsibility. A precise, short, and yet epic cycle of novels.” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Transit

.

04: Eimear McBride, “The Lesser Bohemians”

  • 320 Seiten, September 2016, Irland/Großbritannien
  • Avantgarde-Autorin, in die ich seit “A Girl is a half-formed thing” große Hoffnungen setze: Ich mag, wie simpel und bodenständig der Plot hier wirkt – erwarte aber viele Stil- und Perspektiv-Experimente.

“Upon her arrival in mid-1990s London, an 18-year-old Irish girl begins anew as a drama student. She struggles to fit in—she’s young and unexotic, a naive new girl in the big city. Then she meets an attractive older man. He’s an established actor, 20 years older, and an inevitable clamorous relationship ensues.” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

The Lesser Bohemians

.

05: Angela Palm, “Riverine”

  • 224 Seiten, August 2016, USA
  • Klingt sehr dick auftragen: Bei 400 Seiten wäre ich skeptisch. Aber 224? Das könnte klappen:

“Angela Palm grew up in a house set on the banks of a river that had been straightened to make way for farmland. Every year, the Kankakee River in rural Indiana flooded and returned to its old course while the residents sandbagged their homes against the rising water. From her bedroom window, Palm watched the neighbor boy and loved him in secret. As an adult Palm finds herself drawn back. This means visiting the prison where the boy that she loved is serving a life sentence for a brutal murder. Mesmerizing, interconnected essays about what happens when a single event forces the path of her life off course.” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Riverine: A Memoir from Anywhere But Here

.

06: Natashia Deón, “Grace”

  • 400 Seiten, Juni 2016, USA
  • Historienschmöker, vielleicht unrealistisch verschachtelt. Aber: Figuren, wie ich sie noch nicht kenne!

“A runaway slave in the 1840s south is on the run: Fifteen-year-old Naomi escapes the brutal confines of life on an Alabama plantation and must take refuge in a Georgia brothel run by a freewheeling, gun-toting Jewish madam named Cynthia. There, Naomi falls into a star-crossed love affair with a smooth-talking white man named Jeremy who frequents the brothel’s dice tables all too often. The product of Naomi and Jeremy’s union is Josey, whose white skin and blonde hair mark her as different from the other slave children on the plantation. Josey soon becomes caught in the tide of history when news of the Emancipation Proclamation reaches the declining estate. Grace is a sweeping, intergenerational saga featuring a group of outcast women during one of the most compelling eras in American history.” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Grace: A Novel

.

07: Ashley Sweeney, “Eliza Waite”

  • 327 Seiten, Mai 2016, USA
  • Dass die Figur ausgerechnet Bäckerin wird, scheint mir bieder. Aber: Gutes Setting, schöner Ton, und nicht zu lang/dick.

“After the tragic death of her husband and son on a remote island in Washington’s San Juan Islands, Eliza Waite joins the throng of miners, fortune hunters, business owners, con men, and prostitutes traveling north to the Klondike in the spring of 1898. In Alaska, Eliza opens a successful bakery on Skagway’s main street and befriends a madam at a neighboring bordello. Occupying this space―a place somewhere between traditional and nontraditional feminine roles―Eliza awakens emotionally and sexually. Part diary, part recipe file, and part Gold Rush history, Eliza Waite transports readers to the sights, sounds, smells, and tastes of a raucous and fleeting era of American history.” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Eliza Waite: A Novel
.

08: Lucy Knisley, “Something New”

  • 304 Seiten, Mai 2016, USA
  • Graphic Novel in sympathisch schlichtem, aber vielleicht zu naiven Stil: Jedes Mal, wenn ich in die persönlichen Erlebnisberichte Knisleys blättere, habe ich Lust, alles sofort zu lesen. Aber: Vielen Leuten bleibt es zu flach, süßlich, halbfertig.

“A funny and whip-smart new book about the institution of marriage in America told through the lens of her recent engagement and wedding…. The graphic novel tackles the all-too-common wedding issues that go along with being a modern woman: feminism, expectations, getting knocked over the head with gender stereotypes, family drama, and overall wedding chaos and confusion.” [Klappentext, ungekürzt.]

Something New: Tales from a Makeshift Bride
.

09: Jessi Klein, “You’ll grow out of it”

  • 291 Seiten, Juli 2016, USA
  • Spaß-Feminismus-Plauder-Memoir, vielleicht zu angepasst und erwartbar. Erstmal aber: eine angenehme, gewitzte Stimme.

“As both a tomboy and a late bloomer, comedian Jessi Klein grew up feeling more like an outsider than a participant in the rites of modern femininity. A relentlessly funny yet poignant take on a variety of topics she has experienced along her strange journey to womanhood and beyond, including her “transformation from Pippi Longstocking-esque tomboy to are-you-a-lesbian-or-what tom man,” and attempting to find watchable porn.” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

You'll Grow Out of It
.

10: Theresa Larson, “Warrior”

  • 272 Seiten, April 2016, USA
  • Hier habe ich Angst vor Ideologien: Army-Begeisterung, “G.I. Jane”-Feminismus, übertriebene Militärbegeisterung. Trotz schlimmem Cover und schlimmem Titel aber klingt diese Lebensgeschichte kantig/interessant, und stilistisch bin ich positiv überrascht.

“At ten, Theresa Lawson was a caregiver to her dying mother. As a young adult, a beauty pageant contestant and model. And as a grown woman, a high-achieving Lieutenant in the Marines, in charge of an entire platoon while deployed in Iraq. Meanwhile, she was battling bulimia nervosa, an internal struggle which ultimately cut short her military service when she was voluntarily evacuated from combat. Theresa’s journey to wellness required the bravery to ask for help, to take care of herself first, and abandon the idea of “perfect.”” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Warrior: A Memoir
.

Bonus: drei Titel von 2015, die mir erst jetzt auffielen:
.

1: Sandra Cisneros, “A House of my own. Stories from my Life”

  • 400 Seiten, Oktober 2015, USA
  • Essays einer Baby-Boomerin, Second-Wave-Feminism. Ich mag ihren Ton – aber habe Angst, die meisten Gedanken schon zehnmal gehört zu haben.

“A richly illustrated compilation of true stories and nonfiction pieces that, taken together, form a jigsaw autobiography: From the Chicago neighborhoods where she grew up and set her groundbreaking The House on Mango Street to her abode in Mexico, the places Sandra Cisneros has lived have provided inspiration for her now-classic works of fiction and poetry. Ranging from the private (her parents’ loving and tempestuous marriage) to the political (a rallying cry for one woman’s liberty in Sarajevo) to the literary (a tribute to Marguerite Duras), and written with her trademark sensitivity and honesty, these poignant, unforgettable pieces give us not only her most transformative memories but also a revelation of her artistic and intellectual influences.” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

A House of My Own: Stories from My Life

.

2: Wendi Stewart, “Meadowlark” (dt: “Ein unbesiegbarer Sommer”, 2016)

  • 336 Seiten, Kanada 2015. (Deutsch bei Nagel & Kimche)
  • Kanadische Coming-of-Age-Romane reden manchmal viel zu lange nur über Natur, Schnee und Wildnis-/Jäger-/Farm-Melancholie. Eine Freundin fand das Buch mittelmäßig. Ich bleibe vorsichtig optimistisch:

“Als das Auto der Familie Archer in Kanada durchs Eis eines gefrorenen Sees bricht, kann Robert einzig seine Tochter retten. Rebecca kümmert sich allein um den Haushalt und die Farm, der Vater kapselt sich ab. Trost findet sie in der Freundschaft mit Chuck, einem empfindsamen, von seinem Vater tyrannisierten Jungen, und mit Lissie, die von einer perfektionistischen Adoptivmutter gegängelt wird.” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Ein unbesiegbarer Sommer

.

3: Yeonmi Park, “In Order to Live” (dt: “Mut zur Freiheit. Meine Flucht aus Nordkorea”, 2015)

“Yeonmi Park träumte nicht von der Freiheit, als sie im Alter von erst 13 Jahren aus Nordkorea floh. Sie wusste nicht einmal, was Freiheit ist. Alles, was sie wusste war, dass sie und ihre Familie sterben würde, wenn sie bliebe—vor Hunger, an einer Krankheit oder gar durch Exekution. Sie erzählt von ihrer grauenhaften Odyssee durch die chinesische Unterwelt, bevölkert von Schmugglern und Menschenhändlern, bis nach Südkorea; und sie erzählt von ihrem erstaunlichen Weg zur führenden Menschenrechts-Aktivistin mit noch nicht einmal 21 Jahren.” [Klappentext, minimal gekürzt.]

Mut zur Freiheit: Meine Flucht aus Nordkorea

.

…und drei überzeugende, aktuelle Titel von Männern (alle 2016): 
.

1: Tim Murphy, “Christodora”

  • 496 Seiten, August 2016, USA
  • ich bin skeptisch beim aktuellen schwulen New-York-Epos “A Little Life”, ich bin skeptisch beim aktuellen schwulen New-York-Epos “City on Fire”… aber hier, beim dritten Buch dieses (Mini-)Trends, war ich nach zwei Seiten begeistert: genauer Blick, obskure Details, überraschende Figuren.
  • ein schlechtes Zeiten: die sympathische, doch nicht besonders gut geschriebene Reportage von Tim Murphy über seine eigene HIV-Infektion bei Buzzfeed.

“A diverse set of characters whose fates intertwine in an iconic building in Manhattan’s East Village, the Christodora: Milly and Jared, a privileged young couple with artistic ambitions. Their neighbor, Hector, a Puerto Rican gay man who was once a celebrated AIDS activist but is now a lonely addict, and Milly and Jared’s adopted son Mateo. As the junkies and protestors of the 1980s give way to the hipsters of the 2000s and they, in turn, to the wealthy residents of the crowded, glass-towered city of the 2020s, enormous changes rock their personal lives. Christodora recounts the heartbreak wrought by AIDS, illustrates the allure and destructive power of hard drugs, and brings to life the ever-changing city itself” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Christodora

.

2: Colson Whitehead, “The Underground Railroad”

  • 306 Seiten, August 2016, USA
  • Whitehead vermischt oft Gesellschaftskritik mit satirischen Fantasy-Elementen und absurdem World-Building. Manchmal wird mir das zu läppisch oder gewollt – doch er gewann hierfür den National Book Award, und die Leseprobe überzeugte mich:

“Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. In Whitehead’s ingenious conception, the Underground Railroad is no mere metaphor – engineers and conductors operate a secret network of tracks and tunnels beneath the Southern soil. Ridgeway, the relentless slave catcher, is close on their heels. The Underground Railroad is at once a kinetic adventure tale of one woman’s ferocious will to escape the horrors of bondage and a shattering, powerful meditation on the history we all share.” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

The Underground Railroad

.

3: Richard Russo: “Everybody’s Fool” (dt. “Diese gottverdammten Träume”, 2016)

  • 306 Seiten, August 2016, USA (Deutsch: hier, Dumont)
  • Bisher war mir Russos Kleinstadt- und Altmänner-Romantik immer zu süßlich. Im besten Fall aber kann mich das hier darüber hinweg trösten, dass John Updike keine neuen “Rabbit”-Romane mehr schreiben kann:

“Richard Russo returns to North Bath, in upstate New York, and the characters he created in Nobody’s Fool. The irresistible Sully, who in the intervening years has come by some unexpected good fortune, is staring down a VA cardiologist’s estimate that he has only a year or two left, and it’s hard work trying to keep this news from the most important people in his life: Ruth, the married woman he carried on with for years – and Sully’s son and grandson, for whom he was mostly an absentee figure (and now a regretful one).” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Everybody's Fool
.

DSCF6180

2 comments

  1. Würde nach aktuell zurück liegender Lektüre noch Katharina Winkler “Blauschmuck” (Suhrkamp) und Sonja Harter mit “Weißblende” (Luftschacht – haben allgemein sehr schöne Bücher im Repertoire).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s