“DuckTales” (2017): 50 Things I learned about Scrooge McDuck… by reading the original comics of Carl Barks & Don Rosa

.

.

.

  • the file names of all images in this post include the issue number or the name of the story they’re from.

.

.

.
.

50_Scrooge McDuck first appeared in the Donald Duck comic “Christmas on Bear Mountain” (1947):

.

  • Scrooge was an old miser modelled after Ebenezer Scrooge from Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol”…
  • So it’s fitting that his first story is set on Christmas.
  • Scrooge invites his nephew Donald  and his great-nephews Huey, Lewey and Louie to his mansion on Bear Mountain…
  • …but, as a secret test, dresses up as a bear to find out if Donald (and the kids) are brave and have strength of character.

.

49_In 1947, Donald looks a lot more duck-like, and Duckburg looks VERY Californian:

.

  • Why does Donald live in a house where he can barely reach his own door knob?
  • All duck characters are modelled after North American pekin ducks, but over the years, their necks get drawn shorter.

.

48_Scrooge LOVES the $-sign:

.

  • I particular like the money-green, $-covered undershirt he wears unter his frock…
  • …and the money-green, $-covered curtains in his office.
  • His frock is red, blue, green, sometimes black: It varies from comic to comic.
  • Apparently, it’s always the same piece of clothing, bought in 1902:

.

.

47_Scrooge’s first money bin was in the countryside:

.

  • Scrooge thought that no one would look inside, anyways: It’s near a farm, so people would think it was a corn silo.
  • Many early stories focus on Scrooge’s attempts to hide his wealth from the world…
  • …or find a safe place to stash away his “three cubic acres of money”.
  • In the story below, “Island in the Sky”, Scrogge wants to hide all his money on an asteroid:

.

.

46_Most of Scrooge’s coins are silver, not gold:

.

  • As a European reader, it’s weird to see all the Dollar Signs:
  • In Italian or Scandinavian “Onkel Dagobert” comics, the logo on his money bin says “DD” [for “Dagobert Duck”], and the gold coins are in a fictional (or outdated) currency called “Taler”: If they even have a sign on it, it’s usually a “T”.
  • [Every time Scrooge mentions his businesses, he talks about railroads. But what is a “fish house”, in 1950s Duckburg?]

.

45_A later money bin was housed in an office building on a regular street:

.

  • The Beagle Boys bought the empty lot next to the bin and drilled a hole to syphon out the coins.
  • Yet another later design shows a money bin up on a hill. When the Beagle Boys try to drill through the bottom, Donald floods the bin the wash them out…
  • …but then, sudden cold weather freezes up the water-and-coins-mix – and the money bin combusts.
  • For other Barks-designed money bins over the years, see the second picture below, by Don Rosa, after Carl Barks.

.

.

.

44_Carl Barks LOVES silhouettes

.

  • The visual storytelling is often straightforward, the panel layouts are simple…
  • …but there are some beautiful effects with black outlines. Particularly in the story below, set on an island near Hawaii:
  • “The Menehune Mystery”, 1953

.

.

43_Donald often ponders his masculinity: Is he brave?

.

  • The classic animated cartoons often show Donald as short-tempered and silly…
  • …and European comics depict him as lazy, incompetent or neglectful of his nephews…
  • So it’s fun to see a Donald Duck who’s at least competent enough to identify deerskin, or know what a curator is:

.

.

42_”Christmas on Bear Mountain” suggests that Scrooge doesn’t respect Donald because Donald lacks bravery:

.

  • In episode 2 of the current “DuckTales” cartoon (2017), Webby says that Donald Duck is “one of the most daring adventurers of all time”.
  • And even in the earliest Barks comics, we are supposed to be on Donald’s side.

.

41_Scrooge just wants to be “rich and lonely”:

.

  • Initially, the public doesn’t know about Scrooge’s wealth and he’s not recognized on the street.
  • Once people find out and ask him for favors, he’s annoyed.
  • But even though fame is not important to him, he wants to be the richest person/duck in the world.

.

.

40_Donald can’t publicly shame Scrooge for being stingy:

.

  • Aggressive “go away!” signs and traps have surrounded the hillside of his money bin since the earliest drawings.
  • I’m reminded of Ayn Rand’s cutthroat capitalism, and a conversation in the “Atlas Shrugged” movie:
    Paul Larkin: They say you’re intractable, you’re ruthless, your only goal is to make money.
    Henry Rearden: My only goal is to make money.
    Larkin: Yes, but you shouldn’t say it.

.

39_Donald clearly knows that Scrooge leads an unhappy, neurotic life:

.

  • I love how snarky Donald acts here: He sees the irony.
  • Many Barks comics show how Scrooge suffers, worries and gets paranoid because of his wealth. He seems sad or neurotic most of the time.

.

.

38_When it comes to happiness, Donald seems wiser than his uncle:

.

  • Some of these conversations run suprisingly deep!
  • Scrooge often seems uncultured, narrow-minded, and maybe traumatized from his childhood in Scotland:

.

.

37_There’s also THIS iconic, character-defining quote about Scrooge’s past:

.

  • “[I made my money] by being tougher than the toughies, and smarter than the smarties! And I made it square!”
  • The DuckTales 2013 remastered video game has a special “tougher than the toughies” mode / difficulty level. Video here: Link.
  • Scrooge also gives his “tougher than the toughies” speech in the first episode of “DuckTales” (2017) – but his housekeeper is not even listening. In the episode, he seems full of himself and out of touch with the present.

.

36_When Scrooge dives into his coins, he often uses the same catch-phrases and mantras:

.

  • “I like to dive around in my money like a porpoise! And burrow through it like a gopher! And toss it up and let it hit me on the head!”
  • He fills bath tubs with coins, too.
  • [His rival Flintheart Glomgold does the same.]

.

35_Other characters hurt if they dive into coins:

.

  • “Why didn’t you get hurt?” – “Well, I’ll admit – it’s a trick!”
  • No further details on the mechanics of this “trick”, though.

.

34_From the beginning, there are more than 30 different Beagle Boys.

.

  • So it has to be an organized gang – not just some group of siblings or close relatives.

.

33: This scene was a huge inspiration for “Raiders of the Lost Ark” / “Indiana Jones”

.

  • The Beagle Boys try to steal a Native American statue – but once they lift it, a boulder is let loose as a death trap.
  • After Barks inspired “Raiders of the Lost Ark”, “Raiders” inspired the archeological mysteries of “DuckTales”.
  • I think that’s why the logos for DuckTales and Indiana Jones are so similar.
  • (Red, orange, yellow was a trend for logos in the 1980s.)

.

.

.

32_Some panels favor naturalism and details:

.

  • In the above story, Scrooge hid all his money in a lake, but the Beagle Boys bought the land below and used termites to burst the dam.
  • Below, Scrooge uses an x-ray-machine to look through walls in his family’s castle in Scotland.
  • Barks liked aviation, deep-sea-exploration and gadgets, and I like how matter-of-factly all characters use newish technology like slide machines.

.

.

31_Barks doesn’t get too cartoon-y very often:

.

  • This is one of the most childish moments I found.
  • Later on, this Beagle Boy is carried along on a piece of string, like a balloon, so that he wouldn’t float away.
  • Below is a rather inspired moment: Donald spent days nailed inside a box. When he comes out, even his speech balloon is box-shaped:

.

.

30_Another (rather rare!) moment of surrealism and physical comedy:

.

  • I loved the scene below: Most comics would just show a 2D-tunnel snaking through the page. But Barks took the time to depict a spiral and convey some sense of perspective and depth.
  • Generally, the Beagle Boys do a lot of digging and mining. It gets boring quickly.

.

.

29_Wet feathers DO that?

.

  • This is the only time I saw a wet duck character looking poofy.
  • Overall, characters looked recognizable and on-model nearly all the time – there wasn’t much early installment weirdness (Link).
  • I liked that Scrooge seems to know which nephew is wich: He sometimes called them by names, individually.
  • (personally, I needed the 2017 reboot to properly tell them apart.)
  • Disney archivist Dave Smith: Huey is in red because red is the brightest “hue.” Dewey wears blue, the color of “dew,” a.k.a. water. That “leaves” Louie, the nephew wearing leaf green.

.

.

28_Few women, few different body shapes:

.

  • Most crowd scenes by Barks show men. Women are only seen if the gag or scene would not work with male characters: If they are mothers, dancers etc.
  • Italian and Scandinavian Duck comics often use crass and comical body shapes, so when I saw the two mannequins in the background, I thought:
  • Most of the Disney comics I read had TONS of these funny-looking carricature people in them.
  • The manniquins prove that Barks saw the visual appeal. I don’t know why he didn’t use them more often.
  • Is the anti-capitalist guy below modelled after some real-life person?
  • And: How awesome is that random background detail?

.

.

27_I only found one Barks story that MIGHT pass the Bechdel test:

.

  • Two female characters? With names? Who talk to each other? About something other than a man? [Bechdel Test, Link]
  • I want more Magica DeSpell, I haven’t seen Daisy Duck or Grandma Duck in a Barks story yet, and I personally like Brigitta McBridge.
  • Barks tells boy stories, and there is never much room for women – usually, they’re a distraction.

.

26_I love Goldie’s scrawny look:

.

  • Goldie had a dance hall during the Yukon gold rush. She still lives in Alaska, with her pet bear.
  • She has a makeover for Scrooge and CAN look more regal…
  • But it’s fun to see that time has not been kind to either Scrooge or her: Scrooge stories are often about regrets and mortality.

.

25_Italian sorceress Magica DeSpell is a master of disguises…

.

  • Magica is based on Gina Lollobrigida and Sophia Loren. I was surprised that she’s very, very poor and unkempt, and I think there might be some racist stereotypes against Italians in play.
  • I love how snarky and self-aware everyone acts in the below scene:

.

.

24_Many iconic elements were created by Barks, right away:

.

  • Magica is capable, dangerous, ambitious and snarky, and I enjoyed seeing her wreaking havoc.
  • Apparently, her pet raven Poe is her bewitched brother – but I have not seen that relationship explored in detail before.
  • Below: the first appearence of Magica’s cabin near Mt. Vesuvius, drawn by Barks… and a recreation by Don Rosa, 40 years later.
  • “Ogres for Rent” is inspiring and funny.Barks is original. Don Rosa is, too often, just pedanitc.

.

.

23_Barks is HORRIBLE at depicting cultures:

.

  • Here’s a kind, obese and dim-witted Hawaiian guy… surrounded by invisible, fairy-like beings that helped the Ducks during an Hawaiian adventure.
  • These characters are based on actual myth – they’re called Menehune (Link).
  • Barks gets a LOT of credit for incorporating myths and legends into his storytelling. But I’m appaled by the shallowness, the stereotypes and the one-dimensional roles that these ethnic and “savage” characters often play.
  • Below: The city of Atlantis, and Bark’s AWESOME idea that Atlanteans milk whales…
  • Also: an Atlantean teacher/academic. The cap and the glasses are just lazy storytelling, and the character design bores/annoys me.

.

.

22_Often, all members of a minority look identical:

.

  • True: Huey, Dewey and Loie look identical, too. But it’s strangely… sad to see all these tribes and cultures when, most of the time, you can’t see ANY diversity in age, any women etc.
  • Barks often just draws the same character model, without additional details, again and again. They literally all look the same.

.

21_DuckTales (1987) used quite a lot of his design ideas:

.

  • The aliens in the 1950s comic book look lazy. The 1980s alien doesn’t look original – but still much better.
  • Often, Bark seems to have good ideas for characters – and just lacks the motivation to play with them, diversify etc.

.

20_Armadillo-like stone people who cause earthquakes?

.

  • Some wear bow-ties. Some wear ties. All seem to be male. But at least there are both children and different colors.
  • And (I never saw this episode!) they made it into the 1987 cartoon intact. Cute!

.

.

19_Barks loves the Space Age:

.

  • I like all these rocket designs, and I like the particularly retro design of the “outdated” spaceship that Scrooge bought second-hand.
  • There’s an effortless and very charming sense of wonder in these stories!
  • Below is a story that, matter-of-factly and without context, says that Duckburg had “advanced MUCH farther than other cities in the world” (maybe because of Gyro Gearloose?). I love the idea of a (retro-)futuristic Duckburg – but sadly, I  have not see this mentioned ever again.
  • In 2000, the “Superman” comic books had a storyline where villain Brainiac unleashed a “Y2K virus” to Metropolis – the city was turned into a literal “city of tomorrow”, with flying cars and futuristic buildings. It lasted a while, but sadly, story- or design-wise, nothing too exciting came out of it.

.

.

.

18_Hewey, Duwey and Luie are earnest… but lack personality:

.

  • Nothing sets them apart, and they’re not all that interesting together: I like that they’re not as bratty and mean-spirited towards Donald as they are in the European books, and they’re not as docile and wide-eyed as they’re in “DuckTales” (1987). But I didn’t love them, and I don’t think Barks loves them, either.
  • Below is ONE nice and charming touch: To speak with more authority, one of the siblings climbs on top of the others.

.

.

17_The Junior Woodchucks are all-mighty:

.

  • Barks created the scouting organization and their all-knowing book. Sometimes, the book is used for trivia or exposition… but in one adventure set in Greece, the siblings suddenly (and with no in-story explanation) become INSANELY pedantic.
  • Below, they use an axe to transform an iceberg into a viking longship.
  • And look at these Junior Woodchuck Homing ROCKETS. What could go wrong?

.

.

.

16_Super-Hero comics had a silly “Silver Age”. Barks is a child of that era, too:

.

  • Above, tiny Native-American-like aliens are climbing a rope from their barren home asteroid to a nearby planet that’s full of fruit.
  • Below, the nephews instantly learn their language… by consulting their Junior Woodchuck book.
  • Plus: “They kneel like the American Savages kneeled to Columbus”. Sigh. #colonialism
  • Here’s more about the silliness of “Silver Age”-superhero stories: Link

.

.

15_Flintheart Glomgold is an inefficiant foil to Scrooge:

.

  • They are too similar, and the pedantic and vulgar way they measure their figurative dicks gets tired fast.
  • Flintheart lives in South Africa and has a money bin that sports the Pound sign instead of the dollar sign.
  • Because of the tensions over Apartheid in the late 1980s, “DuckTales” (1987) made Flintheart a Scot.
  • Below, in “Christmas on Bear Mountain”, Scrooge looks like Flintheart himself.
  • In the new “DuckTales” reboot (2017), Flintheart looks plumper and much more distinct.

.

.

14_How fictional is the Duck universe?

.

  • The above panel brings tons of problems:
  • It’s Flintheart’s second appearance, and for some reason (old age?), Scrooge had forgotten about him and needs a long time to recognize his biggst rival. In another story, Donald is asked by Scrooge to collect a debt at a specific address, and he needs to walk down the front lawn and ring before he understands that it’s his own address. For comedic reasons, both Scrooge and Donald have some tedious and out-of-character “Too dumb to live” and “Idiot Ball” moments.
    .
  • A bigger problem, above and below: There are real-world locales in the Duck universe. There are entire fictional nations. And there are shallow parodies, like the “Vampire State Bulding” or “Gemstonia”.
  • Often, Barks shows us the worst of both worlds: One-dimensional invented cultures (that could be much deeper with some additional effort)… and real-world spaces that feel shoddily researched.
  • [Later on, Italian Disney artists often told GREAT time-travel stories where Mickey Mouse travelled through European/Italian history.]

.

.

13_Are ethnic strangers caricatures?

.

  • I HATE that all the characters above come from the same comic, drawn by Barks, and live in the same region: There’s a rather naturalistic Tibetan or Nepalese academic… and there are yellow Himalaya duck-people who, to me, look super-offensive.
  • For the “DuckTales” (1987) episode based on this story, “Trala-La”, the characters were re-designed (Link).
  • Below: a sheik with a typical dog nose and stereotypical clothes… and, in the same comic, savage bush men.

.

.

12_Dog-like humanoids… meet naturalistic humans:

.

  • NOTHING about the camel-riding guy above speaks “Duck comic” to me.
  • It’s grating to see that over-simple character design often makes characters seem simpler/stupider than they are: Imagine the scene below, but with more human-like and serious-looking characters. It would be MUCH more dramatic, and less comedic.

.

.

11_Scrooge is well-travelled, and sometimes, Barks shows his research.

.

  • Is that actual Bengali in these speech bubbles?
  • And why is Scooge making that snarky joke “I learned it when I sold road maps to Marco Polo? In a different story above, he says – much more enthusiastically: “It’s ancient Cathay. I learned it when I was a yak buyer in Tibet.”
  • I still love Scrooge’s curiosity, and his enthusiasm to understand different cultures (to make deals with them and exploit them – but still.)
  • Below: the most naturalistic (and bustiest) woman I saw in a Duck comic by Barks… and some Thai dancers whose design I like… but who look too identical to me: Make these extras individuals!

.

.

.

10_Barks understood Globalization:

.

  • In 1957’s “The City of Golden Roofs”, both Scrooge and Donald become salesmen and try to make big money. They are both assigned Indochina, the   only untapped market, and when Scrooge tries to sell a giant oven, it starts out like the old “selling fridges to an eskimo” joke.
  • Surprisingly, Scrooge doesn’t succeed – while Donald is WILDLY successful… because enough people globally love tapes with contemporary bongo/calypso music.

.

.

.

09_Some Scrooge schemes are inspired. Some are just childish:

.

  • Above: Scrooge changes all his money to bills and cans them – like spinach. For the canning process, he uses robots so that no employees steel from him. Wonderful, silly, inventive idea.
  • Below: The money bin’s burglarly system backfires when Scrooge activates the cannon. The cannon fires… through several buildings… and the cannon ball bounces back when it “hits a stack of mattresses in a rubber mattress factory”. Sorry: No. Just no. (I like the art, though!)

.

.

08_Was Barks pro-capitalism? It’s hard to tell:

.

  • I LOVE that a corporation like Disney tells all these stories about the dangers, problems and paradoxes of wealth, capitalism, exploitation.
  • It seems to be a running gag that whenever Scrooge offers a job to Donald or the nephews, he offers them 30 cents per hour. (Sometimes per day.)

.

.

07_Longer Barks stories often feel like “The Simpsons”:

.

  • About 50 “big” stories by Barks run between 20 and 30 pages. They never get boring, because all too often, they start with a premise, take a weird turn in the middle and end in a completely different locale and with different problems: They very much feel like a later-season-episode of “The Simpson”, where the weirdness that starts out the episode has little connection to the weirdness that later propels the plot.
  • This often feels humdrum or careless – but it’s also exciting, suprising, remarkably entertaining: Why are the Ducks camouflaged as fish? Really: You never saw that coming 5 pages earlier, and it won’t matter 5 pages later. But it’s fun while it lasts!

.

06_If you understand colonialism, MANY Barks stories will make you angry:

.

  • “Africa is nobody’s friend?” Really?
  • In the story below, Scrooge gifts his giant oven/stove to a king and his palace. The oven melts the gold plating of the palace roof, so Scrooge steals the liquid gold and runs away. I love the drawing of the impressive elephants – but I hate how the story ends with celebrating Scrooge’s success: He robbed these people, and we’re supposed to like him for it.

.

.

05_I thought that I read Carl Barks in 1990. I did not:

.

  • Above: Carl Barks’ “Lost in the Andes!”, 1949. Below: Don Rosa’s sequel “Return to Plain Awful”, 1989.
  • The sequel was serialized in Germany’s Micky Maus [“Zurück ins Land der viereckigen Eier”, 1990].
  • So from age 7 to age 34, I thought that I knew Barks and his flaws and quirks…
  • …when really, they were Don Rosa’s flaws and quirks: pedantic storytelling, thick inking, reference-heavy jokes for fans.
  • When I finally read the original “Lost in the Andes” today, I did not love it. But I see how it is a great story for 1949, on a literary and on an artistic level. “Return to Plain Awful” isn’t that much of an achievement for comics of 1989, though. Sorry: I loved discovering and reading Barks. I’m much less lenient with Rosa’s stories, published in the 80s and 90s: In many ways, they look MORE dated and stiffer than Barks’ originals.

.

.

04_Reading Rosa is fun AFTER reading Barks, though:

.

  • Now that I have read that much Barks, I think I will read Don Rosa’s “The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck” (German: “Onkel Dagobert: Sein Leben, seine Milliarden”). I dislike both “Tintin” and “Asterix” – because I grew up with dads of my friends who said that THESE were the comics that could actually teach you about the world. I didn’t enjoy them as a kid, and I still can’t say if they were too didactic, or the wrong kind of didactic, or even not didactic enough. I just never wanted to learn through “Tintin” or “Asterix”.
  • Reading Don Rosa, I feel like it speaks to the same generation and the same attitude towards comics: They’re dense, stiff, overwrought, gray, trying too hard… and BOY, CAN YOU LEARN A LOT HERE.
  • I’m not sure if I want to. But I can see how this is the perfect gift to every Tintin- and Asterix-loving dad I know:

.

.

03_Scrooge as Citizen Kane?

.

  • For years, I thought that Scrooge predated “Citizen Kane” (and Ayn Rand’s hypercapitalist books).
  • Don Rosa used the similarities for the above hommage in his character-defining and award-winning 12-part story “The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck”. It’s fun – but I really wish that a Disney duck had inspired Orson Welles, not the other way around.

.

02_Carl Barks retired from drawing Scrooge comics in 1967:

.

  • …but he kept on painting his hero in the 70s and 80s.
  • Many of these paintings are used or re-staged in the 2017 “DuckTales” series. It’ll be interesting to see who painted them in-universe: Who’s the artist that Scrooge hired, and is he similar to Carl Barks?
  • Don Rosa decided/estimated that Scrooge was born in 1867 and died in 1967, aged 100. Rosa’s stories are set during this historical time-frame. He wrote an episode of “DuckTales” (1987), but did not enjoy that the show was set in the 80s: To him, Scrooge McDuck is dead.
  • The 2017 show makes use of Rosa’s “Family Tree” (based on Barks), and we might see some little-seen characters later in season 1.

.

.

01_The new DuckTales is VERY good!

.

  • I was nervous because Webby and the nephews seemed aggressive and too hipster-y (or “Gravity Falls”-like) in the trailers, but…
  • …wow: I love the soundtrack, I enjoy most of the animation, I LOVE the pace, and I think there’s a great balance between humor, adventure and character-driven moments.
  • I have a hard time understanding Donald. Launchpad seems one-dimensional. I don’t know why Scrooge lives in a mansion and not in his money bin.
  • But really: After seeing the first two episodes, I know that I want to watch the rest, and that I can recommend this to kids and grown-ups.
  • (I also like that Darkwing Duck will show up, and that “TaleSpin”‘s Cape Suzette and “Goof Troops” Spoonerville have been mentioned.)

.

.

.

I did read Carl Barks’:

Christmas on Bear Mountain [1947], The Old Castle’s Secret [1948], Lost in the Andes! [1949], A Financial Fable [1951], Only a Poor Old Man [1952], The Golden Helmet [1952], The Gilded Man [1952], Back to the Klondike [1953], The Menehune Mystery [1953], The Secret of Atlantis [1954], Tralla La [1954], The Fabulous Philosopher’s Stone [1955], The Golden Fleecing [1955], Land Beneath the Ground! [1956], The Second-Richest Duck [1956], City of Golden Roofs [1957], The Golden River [1958], The Money Champ [1959], Island in the Sky [1960], North of the Yukon [1965], Horsing Around with History [1994].

I also read Don Rosa’s The Life & Times of Scrooge McDuck Companion [collection, 2006] and Return to Plain Awful [1989, I read this as a child in the German Micky Maus-Magazin, 1990]

I also enjoyed an Italian meta-story that I read in German as a child: Der Mann hinter den Ducks [1992] by Rudy Salvagnini & Giorgio Cavazzano [German version published in: Lustiges Taschenbuch 196]

.

Stories by Carl Barks that were adapted into DuckTales [1987] episodes [found here]:

  • “Back to the Klondike” “Back to the Klondike”
  • “Land Beneath the Ground!” “Earthquack”
  • “Micro-Ducks from Outer Space” “Microducks from Outer Space”
  • “The Lemming with the Locket” “Scrooge’s Pet”
  • “The Lost Crown of Genghis Khan!” “The Lost Crown of Genghis Khan”
  • “Hound of the Whiskervilles” “The Curse of Castle McDuck”
  • “The Giant Robot Robbers” “Robot Robbers”
  • “The Golden Fleecing”
  • “The Horseradish Story” “Down and Out in Duckburg”
  • “The Status Seeker”
  • “The Unsafe Safe” “The Unbreakable Bin”
  • “Tralla La” “The Land of Trala-la”
  • also, “Terror of the Beagle Boys” inspired parts of “Super DuckTales”

.

Bonus: Webby’s “Wall of Crazy” from the DuckTales (2017) pilot episode, shown on Reddit [Link to r/Ducktales]

.

.

“DuckTales”: neue Episoden nach 30 Jahren.
Familie, Humor, Schatzsuche: Disney adaptiert die Comics von Carl Barks und Don Rosa neu fürs TV. Kindgerecht – oder für alte Fans?
Warum leben Tick, Trick und Track bei ihrem Onkel Donald? Warum ist Donalds eigene Bezugsperson in der Familie Duck sein Onkel Dagobert? Zum ersten Mal will Disney solche Fragen im großen Stil beantworten – in “DuckTales”, einer Neuauflage der Trickserie von 1987. Am 12. August zeigte der Disney-Sender XD Episode 1 und 2 im US-TV, ein Deutschlandstart ist für 2018 geplant. Bisher glückt der Neustart – auch in vielen radikaleren Ideen und Entscheidungen.
Seit 1938 zeichnete und schrieb Carl Barks für Disney; ab 1943 wurden seine Donald-Duck-Comics länger und komplexer: oft 30 Seiten voller Schatzsuchen und Abenteuer. 1947 erfand Barks den vereinsamten und menschenfeindlichen Milliardär Scrooge McDuck, für ein Weihnachtscomic mit Charles-Dickens- und Citizen-Kane-Motiven. Dagobert verkleidet sich heimlich, weil er Donald und den Neffen nur Geschenke überlassen will, falls sie Mut gegen Bären beweisen. Dann bricht ein echter Bär in die Villa ein, und erschreckt auch Dagobert im Bären-Kostüm. Für Carl Barks bleibt Donald Duck noch 20 Jahre lang meist die Hauptfigur. Doch Barks harscher, exzentrischer und oft tragisch geiziger Dagobert wird (besonders auch durch europäische Comics aus Italien und Skandinavien) weltbekannt.
“Jäger des verlorenen Schatzes”, Teil eins der “Indiana Jones”-Reihe, übernimmt 1981 eine Barks-Szene, in der die Panzerknacker eine indianische Statue auf einem Podest verschieben – und damit eine Steinkugel ins Rollen bringen, als Todesfalle für Grabräuber. Sechs Jahre später schaut der Disney-Konzern auf “Indiana Jones”, für seine bis dahin teuerste und langlebigste Trickserie: Bei “DuckTales” (1987) heuert Donald Duck bei der Marine an. Tick, Trick und Track leben in der Villa Onkel Dagoberts, zusammen mit Nicky, der Tochter der Haushälterin und Bruchpilot Quack. Viele Figuren, die Barks erfand, hatten damals große Rollen: Hexe Gundel Gaukeley, Erfinder Daniel Düsentrieb. Bis 1990 erzählten etwa 15 von 100 “DuckTales”-Folgen alte Barks-Comics neu.
1967 ging Carl Barks in den Ruhestand. Er starb erst 2000, mit 99 Jahren. Vor allem in den 70er Jahren zeichnete er große Dagobert-Ölgemälde, und seit den 80er Jahren versucht Zeichner und Barks-Fan Don Rosa, aus den Details, die Barks in Comics oft eher humorvoll hinwirft, eine große Lebensgeschichte von Dagobert Duck zu rekonstruieren: “Onkel Dagobert: Sein Leben, seine Milliarden”. Für Don Rosa wurde Duck 1867 in Schottland geboren und starb 1967 in Entenhausen. Historische Abenteuer, oft in einem sehr konkreten geschichtlichen Rahmen: der Goldrausch am Yukon River in Alaska, Cowboy-Abenteuer in Indonesien, doch wie bei Barks auch Reisen zu Fantasie-Zivilisationen wie dem Land der viereckigen Eier, versteckt in den Anden.
Die Comics von Barks sind schwungvoll, albern, oft kapitalismuskritisch und mitreißend. Don Rosa wirkt pedantischer, nervöser, überfachtet: Abenteuer- und Männercomics fast ohne interessante Frauen, teuer gesammelt oft von Männern jener Generation, die mir als Kind, 1990, auch “Asterix” und “Tim und Struppi” gaben und raunten “Lies! Da kannst du noch was lernen!”. Deutschlehrer-Comics, Bildungsbürger-Comics, Pedanten-Comics, in Deutschland atemlos erfolgreich älteren Herren, die “Duck” mit “u” aussprechen: Donaldisten.
“DuckTales” (1987) blieb eine Kinderserie: oft etwas schleppend erzählt, zu simple Lösungen, kaum Psychologie. Tick, Trick und Track bleiben schlimm gutmütig und passiv. Nicky ist so jung, rosa, naiv und unwichtig wie keine andere Disney-Serienfigur nach ihr. Als 2017 erste Trailer für den “DuckTales”-Neustart veröffentlicht wurden, waren Fans nervös: Nicky ist hier ein hyperkompetentes Nerd-Mädchen mit Geheimagenten-Tick. Sie bewegt sich durch Dagoberts Villa wie in “Mission: Impossible”. Tick, Trick und Track haben klare Persönlichkeiten, aber wirken übertrieben aggressiv: Tick (rot) trumpft durch Wissen auf, Trick (blau) ist nassforsch und liebt Abenteuer, und Track (grün) wird von Fans mit Slytherin-Figuren aus “Harry Potter” verglichen: ambitioniert, aber verschlagen.
Die große Angst der Fans: Klingt, witzelt, frotzelt und erzählt “DuckTales” 2017 wie jede andere US-Trickserie? Stülpt Disney das Strickmuster gesucht hipper Konzepte wie “Gravity Falls” über die Barks-Figuren? Nein. Die flächigen, an alte Comics erinnernden Hintergründe und Farben der neuen Serie sind schroffer als die warmen, liebevollen Details im Original. Die Neuauflage erzählt dreimal so schnell. Doch bisher auf höchstem Niveau: warmherzig, mitreißend, überraschend – eine Kinderserie fürs größte denkbare Publikum. Und überall in Dagoberts Villa hängen die alten Barks-Ölgemälde! Ein Problem bleibt nur Donald Duck. Toll, dass er dieses Mal selbst bei Dagobert einziehen darf. Schlimm aber, dass man seine typische Enten-Schnatterstimme kaum versteht. Donald liefert zwanzig handlungstragende Sätze oder Pointen pro Episode. Bei zwei Dritteln verstehe ich nur “Quack!” Sobald die Serie erzählen wird, wo Donalds Eltern sind oder warum die Neffen von Donalds Schwester in seiner Obhut aufwuchsen, wird das anstrengend und holprig.
“DuckTales” läuft erst ab 2018 in deutscher Synchronisation auf dem Bezahl-Sender Disney XD.

Schullektüren: gelesen im Unterricht [Empfehlungen & Debatte]

.

“Ich hatte immer das Gefühl, dass es zwar einen Schullektürekanon gibt, die Lehrer aber einigermaßen freie Hand hatten, was die konkrete Auswahl des zu lesenden Buches anging. Es musste halt je nach Stufe und Lehrplan eine bestimmte Epoche oder eine bestimmte Gattung sein, aber darüber hinaus schien es keine zwingenden Vorgaben zu geben.

Wie ich jetzt weiß, ist das nicht komplett richtig. Mindestens mit der Einführung des Zentralabiturs gibt es zum Beispiel für NRW Pflichtlektüren für die Oberstufe, in den letzten Jahren war das immer der Faust und irgendwas von Kafka.”

…bloggt Anne Schüßler über Schullektüren (Link):

“Dementsprechend vermute ich immer noch, dass es sowas wie „Pflichtlektüre“ nur in sehr geringem Maße gibt und das meiste in der Hand des einzelnen Lehrers liegt. Davon auszugehen, dass ein Buch allgemein bekannt ist, nur weil man selber es in der Schule gelesen hat, kann also ein Irrweg sein.

.

Meine eigenen Schullektüren?

Seit 2008 nutze ich die Buch-Sortier-Website Goodreads (Erklärtext von mir, Link). Ich habe die meisten Bücher meiner Kindheit und Jugend auf virtuelle Bücherregale sortiert und dort bewertet.

.

1989 wurde ich eingeschult. Ab Klasse 5 hatte ich Englisch, ab Klasse 7 Latein, in Klasse 9 bis 11 Französisch. Meine Leistungskurse waren Deutsch und Englisch, Wahlkurse Psychologie und Philosophie; ich war in der Theater-AG. Einen Literaturkurs oder Lesekreise gab es nicht. Die Unter- und die Oberstufenbibliothek standen uns offen, wurden aber kaum benutzt: Einmal lieh/stahl ich eine englische Ausgabe von Thomas Wolfes “You can’t go home again” – bis heute einer meiner Lieblingsschriftsteller.

.

Facebook-Freundin Selna postete im Juni: “Auf Facebook fragt heute ein Freund, ob wir uns an Schullektüre erinnern, die nicht von weißen Männern geschrieben wurde… und ich denke und denke, aber mir will partout nicht ein einziges Buch aus dem Deutsch- oder Englischunterricht einfallen.”

.

.

rot markierte Bücher fand ich furchtbar, blau markierte großartig.

.

(vor-)gelesen, in der Grundschule:

.

Unter- und Mittelstufe:

  • Otfried Preußler: “Krabat” [stand für Klasse 6 zur Diskussion, las ich dann aber doch nur privat.]
  • Ralf Isau: “Die Träume des Jonathan Jabbok” [keine Lektüre: nur eine Lesung, in Stuttgart.]
  • Sally Perel: “Ich war Hitlerjunge Salmonon” [keine Lektüre; nur Lesung an der Schule.]
  • Tamora Pierce: “Alanna” [alle 4 Bände; keine Lektüre: ein Klassenkamerad hielt ein Referat in Deutsch.]
  • Stanislaw Lem: “Solaris” [keine Lektüre; lieh mir mein Deutschlehrer in Klasse 9, weil ich SciFi mochte.]
  • Morton Rhue: “Die Welle” [keine Lektüre; Freund F. las es in seiner Klasse und ich lieh es aus.]

.

Theater-AG:

.

Oberstufe & Abitur:

.

Englisch-LK:

.

Freundinnen aus meiner Schulzeit sind heute selbst Lehrerinnen. Lektüren, die ich mochte und die sie unterrichten:

neu entdeckt: warmherzig, klug, sehr schultauglich:

.

.

J.G. Ballard: “High-Rise” [Science-Fiction, Dystopie bei WDR 3, Gutenbergs Welt]

.

Ein britischer Roman, 42 Jahre alt – der klingt, als sei er frisch geschrieben: „High Rise“ von James Graham Ballard erzählt von drei Männern, gebildet, kultiviert und liberal. Drei Besserbürger, denen Selbstverwirklichung und eigener Stil so wichtig sind, dass sie bei jedem Einkauf und jedem Stück Kultur, mit dem sie sich umgeben, erst fragen: Was sagt das über mich? Wie wohnt der Mensch, zu dem ich werden möchte? Was soll ich essen? Wie muss ich sprechen? Und welche Gesten und Ideen, welche Ängste oder Träume sind unter meinem Niveau – weil ich aufsteigen will?

Die Männer arbeiten als Arzt, Filmemacher und Architekt. Und sie sind Nachbarn, in einem Luxus-Wohnkomplex, 40 Etagen hoch. Der Architekt wohnt auf dem Dach – und blickt herab:

.

„Das Gebäude war ein Zeugnis des guten Geschmacks. Der gut gestalteten Küche, formschöner Haushaltsgegenstände, des eleganten und nie protzigen Mobiliars. Doch wenn er die Apartments seiner Nachbarn aufsuchte, fühlte er sich physisch abgestoßen von den Konturen einer preisgekrönten Kaffeekanne und den gut aufeinander abgestimmten Farbgebungen. Er hätte sonstwas für eine vulgäre Nippesfigur auf dem Kaminsims gegeben, für ein weniger als schneeweißes Toilettenbecken, für einen Schimmer der Hoffnung.“

.

Alle 2000 Bewohner stammen aus dem selben Milieu. Doch ihre Eigentumswohnungen sind nach Preis gestaffelt: Junge und Kreative wohnen in WGs, ganz unten. Apartments bis zur 30. Etage können sich nur höhere Angestellte leisten: das Bürgertum, das schuftet, um sich und der Familie „die zweitbesten“ Produkte im Leben zu sichern. Ganz oben gibt es kaum noch Kinder: Superreiche und Promis verwöhnen ihre Hunde, und geben dekadente Partys.

„High Rise“ handelt von der Macht der „feinen Unterschiede“. 1975 galt vieles davon noch als dunkle, absurde Satire: Kaum sind die Wohnungen belegt, beginnt ein Klassenkampf. Mehr noch – ein echter Bürgerkrieg!

.

„Tatsächlich hatte sich das Hochhaus bereits in die drei klassischen sozialen Gruppen – in Unter-, Mittel- und Oberschicht – aufgeteilt. Die meisten Beschwerden richteten sich jetzt mehr gegen die anderen Bewohner als gegen das Gebäude. Das Versagen der Fahrstühle wurde Leuten aus den oberen und unteren Etagen zur Last gelegt, nicht den Architekten.“

.

Luxus, Angst, Kontrollverlust – in den 70er Jahren waren es vor allem Katastrophenfilme wie „Flammendes Inferno“ oder „Westworld“, die in drastischen Bildern zeigten: Alles kann schief gehen. Jede Maschine hat Fehler, jedes System hat Schwachstellen und Spannungen. Moderne Bürger haben so viele Lebenslügen, Wut, Komplexe… daran kann jede Gesellschaft über Nacht zerbrechen.

Heute werden solche Geschichten vor allem als Psycho-Thriller erzählt: Das Unbehagen wächst nur langsam. Aktuelle Bücher, Filme, Serien zeigen zwar gern, wie alles eskaliert. Doch vorher nehmen sie sich viel Zeit, die Bruchstellen, Ursachen, Zusammenhänge zu zeigen. Der Karren fährt zwar gegen die Wand – aber meist in Zeitlupe.

„High-Rise“ dagegen hat das Tempo der 70er Jahre: Erst fallen ein paar Fahrstühle aus. Dann wird ein Hund im Pool ertränkt. Und sofort beginnt ein Häuserkampf mit Kannibalismus und Vergewaltigung, Ritualmorden und sämtlichen Horror- und Barbarei-Klischees. So wird der Roman schon nach dem ersten Drittel… zu freudlosem Trash:

.

„Die fünf Obergeschossfahrstühle waren entweder außer Betrieb oder in die oberen Etagen gebracht worden und wurden dort mit blockierten Türen festgehalten. Der Eingang zur Halle im zehnten Stock war mit Tischen und Stühlen versperrt, die man aus der Grundschule geholt und die Treppe hinuntergeworfen hatte.“

.

250 Seiten lang steigen drei Männer rauf und runter: anfangs mühelos. Dann tage- und wochenlang. Sie essen Hunde. Sie vergewaltigen und hassen. Auf Englisch klingt das monoton und lapidar. Auf Deutsch dagegen auch sprachlich oft absurd: Denn Übersetzer Michael Koseler baut Schachtelsätze voller Stilblüten. Eine „middle-aged woman“, eine Frau mittleren Alters, wird als „mittelalterliche“ Frau übersetzt. Durch solche Marotten klingen banale Sätze auf Deutsch plötzlich unnötig kompliziert.

„High Rise“ will zeigen, wie leicht ein Miteinander zerbricht, weil jede Schicht die Schuld bei „denen da oben“ oder „denen da unten“ sucht – zu selten aber im System selbst. 1975 – ganz kurz, bevor der Punk London erobert, schwelgt ein zynischer, systemkritischer Roman in… punkiger Zerstörungslust.

Psychologisch aber bleibt das lieblos, seicht und dumm – denn alles eskaliert so schnell, so grell, so langweilig-erwartbar… das Buch misslingt: als Lifestyle-Kritik. Es misslingt als Dystopie. Es misslingt als Psychogramm einer snobistischen Gesellschaft. Und es misslingt als Parabel über Bürgerkriege und abgeschottete Länder, in denen jede Ordnung zerfällt.

Der Autor hat sich einen tollen Handlungsort geschaffen. Und beißend narzisstische, verwöhnte Figuren – die einen Nerv treffen. Heute noch deutlich mehr als damals. „High Rise“ beschreibt ein Unbehagen, Risse und Symptome, die aktuell ständig Thema sind: Abstiegsangst, Elitenhass, Kultursnobismus, Aufstieg um jeden Preis und das Abschotten nach unten.

Deshalb ist „High Rise“ ein wichtiges, an vielen Stellen visionäres Buch. Nur leider: kein gutes, kein kluges, kein lesenswertes. Ein Arzt kann Krankheiten erkennen – und erklären. J.G. Ballard dagegen sieht nur Symptome. Er kann diese Symptome imitieren. Und baut daraus ein grelles, giftiges Horror-Märchen. Doch er versteht nicht viel. Und sagt: fast nichts.

.

J.G. Ballard: “High-Rise”. Aus dem britischen Englisch von Michael Koseler. 256 Seiten. Diaphanes, Juni 2016. Original von 1975.

Text: Rezension von mir, für Christian Möllers Literatursendung “Gutenbergs Welt” auf WDR 3.

.

Nicholson Baker: “Der Anthologist”, “Das Regenmobil”, “Menschenrauch”

.

2005 las ich Nicholson Bakers – eitlen, pompösen, enttäuschend flachen – Holocaust-Roman “Pfeil der Zeit”: Das Leben eines NS-Täters, rückwärts erzählt, beginnend mit seinem Tod in den USA. Ein Buch wie eine Schreibübung: sehr selbstbewusst, gesucht originell… aber mir fehlten Tiefgang und historische Genauigkeit.

Zehn Jahre später las ich drei weitere Bücher von Baker – alle lesenswerter:

.

NICHOLSON BAKER, “Das Regenmobil”

“Paul ist Dichter (mäßig erfolgreich) und vermisst seine Exfreundin Roz, die ihn verlassen hat. Um seinem Leben wieder Sinn zu geben und seinen drohenden Fünfdundfünfzigsten zu vergessen, besorgt er sich eine akustische Gitarre und sattelt auf Pop- und, vor allem, Protestsongs um. Er weiß nicht, was ihm mehr zuwider ist: Amerikas Drohnenkrieg oder Roz’ neuer Freund. Während er auf seinem alten Bauernhof in Maine darüber nachdenkt, erheitern allerlei tröstliche Alltagsvergnügen sein schwankendes Gemüt: sein Traum-Rasensprenger, die Saiten seines Eierschneiders, die einen fast perfekten Mollakkord ergeben, einige Experimente mit Tabak…” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

Das Regenmobil

.

ein kurzes Essay von mir – zum Buch und seinem Vorgänger “Der Anthologist” (2009):

.

Vergiss Amerika!

Literarische Fehlschläge aus den USA – in Deutschland gefeiert und bestaunt: Nicholson Bakers „Das Regenmobil“ ist überflüssig. Und wunderbar.

.

Für je eine Stunde halten Quäker eine öffentliche, stille Andacht. Zum Ende darf dann jeder Gast, Besucher laut sprechen und persönliche Erlebnisse teilen. Keine Predigt. Sondern scheinbar nebensächliche Anekdoten und Ideen.

Paul Chowder ist der König solcher Nebensächlichkeiten: ein Phrasendrescher, Wirrkopf und Privatgelehrter über 50. In Nicholson Bakers „Das Regenmobil“ will er unter Quäkern zur Ruhe finden. Doch stattdessen kommt er immer weiter ins Quatschen, Fabulieren, Assoziieren. Der literarische Monolog eines Mannes, der Ruhe sucht – und alles niederquasselt. Als Ich-Erzähler und Podcaster stolpert Paul (Single, Lyriker, Hobbymusiker) fast 300 Seiten lang durch faszinierend flexible Gedanken- und Erinnerungspaläste. Oder verirrt sich im schlimmsten, banalsten Stuss.

„Das Regenmobil“ ist ein Zeitroman, so richtungslos verlabert, träge amorph, dass Kritiker Jörg Magenau darin gar nichts Literarisches mehr finden konnte. Noch 2010 wurde Baker in Deutschland für diesen Erzählstil fast durchgängig gelobt. Damals erschien „Der Anthologist“, Bakers erstes Paul-Chowder-Quasselbuch. Einen Sommer lang saß Paul im Vorgängerroman in der Scheune seines Elternhauses. Er hatte eine Sammlung Lieblingsgedichte kuratiert und sollte ein etwa 40 Seiten langes Vorwort nachliefern – über Sinn und Unsinn von Reimen. Weil er keinen roten Faden fand, sich drückte, zog seine Lebensgefährtin Roz aus. „Der Anthologist“ war sperrig, intelligent. Und wurde aus den falschen Gründen gelobt.

„Ich hab dich tanzen sehen / mehr soll mir nicht geschehn / ich musste gleich ‘n Gummi erstehn’“, reimt Paul im neuen Roman. Die fertige Lyrik-Anthologie bringt ihm genug Tantiemen, um jahrelang zu träumen, E-Gitarre zu lernen und in Quäker-Andachten, Liedtexten, Songwriting zu dilettieren. „Eine Liebeserklärung an die Poesie“ schwärmten deutsche Kritiker und Lyrikfans bei Buch 1 – obwohl Paul erkennbar wirr, Nicholson Baker klar satirisch erzählt. Buch 2, „Das Regenmobil“, steht prima für sich allein: Es ist weniger Fortsetzung als Variation. Derselbe Schwätzer im selben irrwitzig-doof-originellen Stream-of-Halbdurchdachtem. Nur weniger Spannung, Plot, roter Faden.

Seit 25 Jahren spielt Baker in Romanen und Collagen mit Sinn und Unsinn widersprüchlicher Statements – und immer wieder nehmen ihn Kritiker in Sippenhaft für Aussagen seiner Figuren. „Menschenrauch“, das vielleicht beste Baker-Buch, ordnet Statements von Politikern und Autoren von den 20er Jahren bis 1941. In brillant montierten, widersprüchlichen Zitaten zeigte Pazifist Baker, wie es zu Holocaust, Bombenkrieg, Kampf gegen Zivilbevölkerungen kommen konnte. Quer durchs Buch mahnt Pazifist Gandhi zum Frieden, schickt selbstgerechte Briefe an Churchill und Hitler – so tragisch weltfremd, dass man heulen mag. Gandhi ist in Bakers journalistischer Textcollage, für die er kein Wort erfand oder änderte, die fadenscheinigste Stimme, mit den wackligsten Argumenten.

Weil Patrick Bateman in „American Psycho“ Frauen hasst, wurde Autor Bret Easton Ellis als Frauenhasser boykottiert. Weil der Erzähler in Christian Krachts „Imperium“ den Rassentheorien des Kaiserreichs vertraut, wollte Kritiker Georg Diez in Kracht einen Nazi erkennen. Gilt „Der Anthologist“ unter deutschen Kritikern als lesenswert, weil Baker seinen Paul Chowder dort seitenlang für Lyrik schwärmen lässt? Misslingt Teil 2, „Das Regenmobil“, weil Paul dieses Mal lieber seichte Balladen assoziiert? Verdarben, wie deutsche Kritiker schimpfen, weltfremde Gandhi-Zitate „Menschenrauch“?

Statt Ängste und Gefühle klar auszusprechen, strotzt US-Prosa seit ca. „Der Fänger im Roggen“ vor ambivalenten, vage poetischen Erinnerungsbildern und Anekdoten: Viele Szenen enden mit Figuren, die einen kurzen Natur- oder Straßenmoment aus der Erinnerung beschreiben; statt ihre Probleme anzugehen, erinnern Ich-Erzähler, was sie vor fünf, zehn Jahren träumten, aufschnappten, zufällig sahen. Irgendein Tier, das sich seltsam verhielt. Passanten, deren Geschichte sie rätseln ließ.

Solche scheinbar nebensächlichen Anekdoten brauchen keine feste Aussage, klare Bedeutung. Oft stehen sie vage suggestiv im Raum – wie nach der Quäker-Andacht. „Das Regenmobil“ fädelt fast nur solch unbestimmtes, fast beliebiges Gedankenmaterial aneinander. Ob sich das lohnt, entscheidet die persönliche Toleranz für Abschweifungen: Lieber sieben Stunden durch Wikipedia klicken?

„Man kann es nicht alles einbeziehen“, klagt Paul über seine Lust nach Abschweifung. „Man könnte meinen, ich schreibe ein Gedicht, und es wird alles Gute enthalten und auch alles Schlechte und alles dazwischen – es wird Henry Cabot Lodge, Wolken, Auberginen, Chuck Berry und die neue Geschmacksrichtung der Zahnpasta von Tom’s of Maine, Bantamhähne, Tankstellen, aquamaringrüne Vespas und die Übersalzung von Landstraßen enthalten – aber das funktioniert nicht. Ich hab’s versucht.“

Lange dachte ich, „Das Regenmobil“ sei schlampig übersetzt. Doch auch im Original sind Pauls Sätze frustrierend unsauber: Baker rührt hier absichtlich schwammiges Palaver. Zu allem Überfluss erscheinen Nicht-US- Lesern auch noch jene Bausteine poetisch aufgeladen, latent geheimnisvoll, die für US-Bürger Alltag sind: ein Bantamhahn? Quäker? Tom’s of Maine?

Das Fachwort für krankhaftes Alles-zueinander- in-Beziehung-Setzen ist Apophänie. Mit einem ähnlich übereifrigen Alles-hängt-wohl-irgendwie- zusammen-Konzept gewann Frank Witzel 2015 den deutschen Buchpreis. Figuren und vage Bedeutungskonstrukte, die ans Internet erinnern, persönliche Timelines, nicht-lineare Räume, in denen unterschiedlichste Gedanken, Splitter nebeneinander stehen und sich mit neuen Zweit- und Drittbedeutungen aufladen.

Bitte aber hört auf, Baker jedes Mal als „lesenswert!“ zu umjubeln, wenn er jemanden sagen lässt „Lyrik ist lesenswert!“, aber für einen weltfremden Trottel, wenn er ein weltfremdes oder unsympathisches Zitat zitiert. An dummen Aussagen von Bakers Figuren entlarvt sich kein schlechter Schriftsteller.

An der Kritik an “dummen” Baker-Sätzen entlarven sich schlechte Kritiker.

Nicholson Baker: Das Regenmobil. Aus dem Amerikanischen von Eike Schönfeld. 298 Seiten, Rowohlt 2015.

.

“Menschenrauch” las und emfahl ich 2015, zusammen mit einer anderen Textmontage über den zweiten Weltkrieg:

.

HANS MAGNUS ENZENSBERGER (Hg.), “Europa in Trümmern” (Taschenbuch-Titel: “Europa in Ruinen”), Augenzeugenberichte 1944-1948. Reportage-Reader, Deutschland 1990.

.
Europa in Ruinen: Augenzeugenberichte aus den Jahren 1944 bis 1948Für die Andere Bibliothek sammelte Hans Magnus Enzensberger Reportagen über das Leben in den Städten Europas in der Endphase des zweiten Weltkriegs bis 1948. Literaten, Reporter, Diplomaten berichten (meist aus Ländern, in denen sie nur Besucher sind) über Zerstörung, Wiederaufbau, Unmenschlichkeit und nationale Wunden und Neurosen.

Eine langsame, packende, abwechslungsreiche Textcollage mit Stig Dagerman, Alfred Döblin, Janet Flanner, Max Frisch, Martha Gellhorn, John Gunther, Norman Lewis, A.J. Liebling, Robert Thompson Pell und Edmund Wilson. [Gellhorn, Dagerman und Janet Flanner sind am besten/eindringlichsten.]

Ausführlicher journalistischer Reader – tolle Auswahl, viel gelernt. Aber: ein paar Beiträge sind eitel, effekthascherisch.

.

NICHOLSON BAKER, “Human Smoke. The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization”, Textcollage (20er Jahre bis 1941), USA 2008.

.
Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization“Europa in Trümmern” ist literarischer: längere Texte, mehr Raum, um Atmosphären, Stimmung festzuhalten. Doch “Human Smoke” riss mich mit: flüssig, kühn und oft überraschend sammelt Baker Textschnipsel, diplomatische und kulturgeschichtliche Anekdoten, Zitate über die politischen, weltanschaulichen und demagogischen Weichen, die in Deutschland, England, den USA, Japan, Italien, Frankreich etc. zwischen den 20er Jahren und 1941 gestellt wurden: ein Mosaik aus Tagebuch- und Presseschnipseln über den Verfall der Zivilsation, totalen Krieg und Holocaust, Waffenhandel, Brandbomen und nationalen Hass. Ich habe unglaublich viel gelernt – und hätte das 500-Seiten-Buch noch genossen, wäre es dreimal so lang.

Walter Kempowskis WW2-Textcollage “Das Echolot” steht noch ungelesen im Regal: Ich glaube, mir geht es dort zu viel um hilflose kleine Leute und ihre schlichten, kaum politischen Kartoffel-, Tornister- und Bombenkeller-Sorgen. Ich liebe die postmodernen Collageromane von David Markson – doch die Schnipsel sind meist zu kurz, und man braucht zu viele Bildungsbürger-Vorkenntnisse, um Marksons schnelle, oft arrogante Pointen zu verstehen. Bakers Riesen-Textcollage ist die bisher beste Lösung, Mentalitätsgeschichte in Schnipseln zu erzählen: ein Kulturtagebuch der Entmenschlichung. Bittere, faszinierende, oft zynische Häppchen Zeitgeschichte, ideal pointiert, ideal gehaltvoll.

Viele Zusammenhänge, viele Konflikte, die ich zum ersten Mal verstehe. Großer Gewinn, großes, trauriges Lesevergnügen.

Queere Literatur: “Lutra Lutra” (Matthias Hirth, 2016)

Portraitfoto Matthias Hirth: Nemetschek-Stiftung

.

Schund und Sühne

Brillant – und pornografisch? Matthias Hirth seziert Begehren und Exzess der 90er Jahre.

.

Geld verdirbt den Charakter. Wer konsumiert, verbraucht dabei auch Menschen. Was wird aus Nähe, Sex, Intimität, wenn eitle Player Marktzwänge und -logik ins Private tragen? Vor 20, 25 Jahren, in Satiren wie „American Psycho“, wurden solche Verrohungen klug auserzählt. Heute überrascht Matthias Hirth, geboren 1958, mit einem Nachzüglerroman, wie aus der Zeit gefallen: „Lutra lutra“, das sind 736 ironiefreie Seiten über einen Münchner Schnösel, „Fleck“ Fleckensteiner, Anfang 30, und die skrupellosesten Wochen seines Lebens – den Jahreswechsel 1999/2000.

Ein Buch über Ängste der 80er, den Hedonismus der 90er und einen weltmüden Nichtstuer, der so viel Geld erbt, dass er alle Tage, Nächte einer einzigen Frage widmen kann: „Was würdest du tun, wenn du etwas Böses tun wolltest?“

Flecks Freundin macht Schluss, treibt das gemeinsame Kind ab. Und aus gekränktem Stolz, Langeweile, Abenteuerlust probiert Fleck viele Männer, einige Frauen durch. Flirtet. Quält. Beobachtet sich selbst als Spieler, Kinkster, Lustobjekt. 

„Sein Dasein kommt ihm vor wie eine leere Fläche, in die er nach Belieben Dinge stellen kann, ein Ozean, in dem jeder Weg möglich ist. Ich bin frei, denkt er. Der jetzige Moment hat mit dem vorigen keinerlei Verbindung.“ Ein haltloser, reicher Mann sucht Wege, alles aufzusprengen: Privilegien, sexuelle Rollen, jede materielle oder moralische Abhängigkeit. Ein New-Economy-Klischee?

Drei Jahre lang erforschte Matthias Hirth in einem Think Tank Zukunftsmodelle und Science-Fiction-Utopien, für einen Autohersteller. Flecks Oberstufen-Existenzialismus wirkt dagegen kaum visionär: Warum die vielen Referenzen zu Dostojewskis „Schuld und Sühne“? Der lange Blick zurück ins Jahr des Fischotters (lat.: Lutra lutra), 1999? Mit ein paar Szenegängern, Strichern schlafen – über viele erste Seiten hinweg scheint weder Autor Hirth noch seiner Figur Fleck Klügeres, Wilderes, Drastischeres einzufallen.

Originell, markant und klug wird „Lutra lutra“ erst durch den Umfang: Hirth gönnt Fleck ein Ensemble zunehmend komplexer Gegner, Reibeflächen. Was ist mit HIV? Wo treffen sich Wegwerf-Sexpartner plötzlich wieder? Wurde Fleck „über Nacht“ schwul – wie ärgerlich viele schlecht geschriebene Figuren: Ignoriert das Buch Bisexualität? Nein. Fleck darf sich lustvoll, klug verrennen. Er findet eine Haltung. Zeit vergeht. Die Stimmung kippt. Er findet eine bessere Haltung. Doch wieder stellt ein wenig Zeit alles in Frage.

Autoren ordnen solche Haltungswechsel oft als Reife- und Lernprozess: In vielen Büchern münden Schlingerpartien in einer großen, finalen Erkenntnis. „Lutra lutra“ dagegen bleibt eine schmerzhaft offene, zunehmend raffinierte Langzeitbelichtung: Hirth nutzt jede Seite, um die romantischen und weltanschaulichen Wenden eines Mannes, der keinen Sinn mehr darin sieht, sich selbst am Marktwert seiner Partner zu messen, klug, rührend, emotional erwachsen immer grundsätzlicher zu hinterfragen.

Die Sprache bleibt schlicht und süffig. Sex darf hier sexy, Liebe lieblich, Verkopftes unglaublich verkopft, alles Obszöne krass obszön klingen. Ein bisschen kunstlos – manchmal auch nur: bollernd pornografisch. Das Psychogramm einer Figur, in Zeiten des Börsen-Booms so relevant wie heute. Überraschend weit gedacht. Und, in vielen Sexszenen: überraschend erregend.

.

MATTHIAS HIRTH, “Lutra Lutra” 736 Seiten, Voland & Quist 2016.

“Worin besteht wirkliche Stärke? Wie erreicht Fleck, 32, die Ausstrahlung, die ihn für jede Frau und jeden Mann unwiderstehlich macht? Er kommt zu dem Schluss, dass es für ihn nur einen Weg zu vollkommener Selbstbestimmtheit gibt: mit sämtlichen Regeln der Gesellschaft zu brechen. Hirths Roman zeigt die Verbindung von Sex und Gewalt, Coolness und Terrorismus. Heimlicher Held ist das Jahr 1999, das Jahr des Fischotters (lat.: Lutra lutra), das Jahr vor dem Zusammenbruch der New Economy und der großen Arbeitslosigkeit – das letzte Jahr der guten alten Zeit.” [Klappentext, gekürzt]

.

Lutra lutra

in English: Frank Witzel’s “Die Erfindung der Roten Armee Fraktion durch einen manisch-depressiven Teenager im Sommer 1969” (German Book Prize 2015, Translation)

Die Erfindung der Roten Armee Fraktion durch einen manisch-depressiven Teenager im Sommer 1969

[“One Manic-Depressive Teenager’s Invention Of The Red Army Fraction [terror group] In The Summer Of 1969”]

Frank Witzel [Link to Wikipedia.org]

Matthes & Seitz, 2015. No English editon yet.

.

There are two main ways to access and describe Frank Witzel’s daunting-but-enjoyable, ambitious-but-not-too-complex, autobiographical-but-wildly-freewheeling, conventional-but-INSANE tragicomical 800-page novel about a 13-year old Beatles-loving upper-middle-class Catholic boy stuck in a suburb of provincial Wiesbaden in 1969:

It’s a normal book, to the point of being a little bland: Since publication in early spring of 2015, there has been a steady trickle of benevolent reviews and reader reactions – and most of them praise the book for being a charming coming-of-age novel trying hard to capture typical feelings of alienation and awkwardness. It’s a book about norms. About being normal. About feeling not quite normal. It’s a rather conventional story/theme/autobiographical approach – and it will speak to baby boomers or anyone older than 13. Darker than David Mitchell’s “Black Swan Green”. Lighter than John McGahern’s “The Dark”. Less saccharine than the nostalgic US dramedy “The Wonder Years”; but equally obsessed with name-dropping 1960s topics and pop-culture references. Witzel’s novel treads very familiar, well-covered ground – but that’s not a bad thing: It’s approachable, it’s incredibly well-researched/authentic. The main character resonates.

Over the course of 800 pages, though, all of this will get subverted, parodied, deconstructed through increasingly outlandish tone shifts, perspective shifts, literary experiments and improv. It’s like Frank Witzel took a simple, not-too-complex ditty… and, like a Jazz musician, started one crazy 800-page jam session – until he ran out of steam. After increasingly tedious narrative wheel-spinning, the novel just stops, with little resolution. So: It’s not a normal book. At all.

I will talk about the merits and problems of this later.

Let’s start with the surface – all the ways the book wants to be normal, typical and capture “normal and typical” German middle-class life in the 1960s: The unnamed narrator – in some chapters, it is suggested that his name might be Frank Witzel – is a book-smart, but rather clueless, coddled, devout and daydreaming son of a detached and bourgeois factory owner. He’s in 7th grade, his mother is suffering from a (little-discussed) nervous condition that paralises her legs and so, the Caritas social services send a live-in caretaker – only referred to as die Frau von der Caritas – who might or might not be having an affair with the father, and who might or might not be a GDR spy or GDR defector.

All characters remain blurry like that – because the narrator is making up stories and daydreams, and in 98 chapters, there are 30 to 50 different styles/tones. Many elements that seem outlandish daydreams get a more realistic re-telling in later chapters – and vice versa. Is the father the owner of a small factory… or a mighty industrialist? Is die Frau von der Caritas a spooky seductress…. or just some lonely social worker who has to deal with being antagonized and sexualized to Bond-villainess proportions by a pubescent, creepily misogynist narrator?

It’s not a matter of “truth” versus “daydream” or “delusion”, but a matter of tone and style: In more down-to-earth chapters, the characters are overly typical small-town clichès from the 60s, with typical, mildly comedic struggles and neuroses. In more outlandish chapters, they play biblical, literary or emblematic 1960s roles – crass supervillains and rock stars, terrorists and vixens. These tone shifts aren’t whimsical – they’re disorienting, disturbing and hint at larger psychological problems of the main character: Is he a daydreaming kid and underachiever with mood swings? Or is he full-on delusional?

In chapter 1, the narrator and two classmates – dopey, Ron-like Bernd and competent, Hermione-like Claudia – leave behind a NSU (car) they stole (from whom?) to form a “terror group”/secretive youth club named “Rote Armee Fraktion”. They manage to outrun the police (a dream-like and absurd sequence: a fantasy?), but accidentally leave several novelty gifts/sweets/childish gimmicks in the car’s glove compartment that could get them identified. Through much of the novel, the narrator fears that a) die Frau von der Caritas will rat him out to the police, b) his grades will slip and he’ll be forced into a strict Catholic boarding school (this does actually come to pass in one chapter, after 400 pages – but it’s unclear whether it’s a fantasy sequence or reality), c) that he’ll suffer God’s wrath or that the universe is somehow conspiring against him and he’s deeply broken or ruined.

There is, of course, the real-life terror group “Rote Armee Fraktion” that’s been active in the same year, and in various chapters, it’s very much in flux whether the narrator’s own childish pipe dream of a youth gang, coincidentally named “Rote Armee Fraktion”, predates that group or copies it. There’s also a string of questioning/session transcript chapters throughout the book (all flash-forwards into the 21st century) where an investigator and/or a taunting psychologist wants the main character, now middle-aged, to confess to various RAF crimes and/or confess that his own RAF is imaginary and he himself has delusions of grandeur.

Both religion and music play a huge part in the narrator’s “private mythology”: You don’t have to know much about Catholicism, specific saints and/or the Beatles, Cream and late-60s pop music, though… because most of the references explain themselves through context… but you might remember the overlong, satirical music chapters in “American Psycho”, where Patrick Bateman starts dissecting bands like Genesis or Huey Lewis and the News? Witzel’s main character does the same, and it’s equally satirical/disorienting/weird: Instead of plot development, you can find yourself in some semi-funny, semi-serious 20-page-long side note about hidden meanings in The White Album or pseudotheological essays on whether Jesus and the Beatles have the same attitude towards guilt, sin and redemption. These chapters are very well researched and specific, but they also have a show-off quality that reminds me of the weirder logorrhoeic passages of David Foster Wallace’s “Infinite Jest”. It’s brilliant, it’s joyful, it’s very, very skilful – but it’s going on for 800 pages, and it gets pointless and show-offy too quickly.

This is what most people say about the book, and this is why the reviews are solid, but there are not a lot of huge fans: It’s a charming, playful and, despite some surrealist clutter, authentic coming-of-age novel that rings very true. But why is it 800 pages long? Why does the plot just peter out – very much like “Infinite Jest”?

.

There’s a psychological fallacy called Apophenia: the idea that people are too eager to see patterns, connect dots, find meaning in random occurrences. Witzel could have written a more conventional 200-page novel that would have been more entertaining, inviting, engaging. But – and this is why I said that this is not a normal book, at all – he needs 800 pages to make a bigger, more abstract point:

Most biographies or coming-of-age books find some leitmotifs, establish them and see them through. It would have been easy to say “In 1969, 13-year-old boys were both repelled and intrigued by counter-culture. When the RAF terror group turned into pop stars, Germany’s collective fears and adulation resembled that of a coddled, overwhelmed 13-year old boy.” Witzel shows a main character whose main frame of reference has been Catholicism, sins and saints and who uses that lens to make sense of the Beatles, pop music, terrorists, counter-culture. It’s one big, neurotic mishmash with many surreal and intriguing and outrageous connections: the Beatles are saints! Bullies are satanists! I’m a martyr, and God tests me, and I’m also an Indian, and you are a Bond girl! etc.

But through 98 chapters and 800 pages, Witzel remixes and shifts these connections and pseudo-leitmotifs until they appear random, haphazard, absurd. SO random, haphazard and absurd that you’ll start thinking “Wait: Autobiography is such a construct!” or “Wow: Leitmotifs are sorta shoddy, cheap and random!” A 13-year old has a limited understanding of the world, a limited set of phrases and images, and it’s disturbing (and cruelly fun!) to see how someone with a provincial, outdated and limited set of 1950s words/tools/lenses/concepts tries to make sense of terrorism, growing up, sin, the 60s etc.

It’s a brilliant way to show the limitations of speech and the problems of private and collective “mythologies” – and it’s not a very German thing: there are tons of references to German brands or 60s TV shows etc., but they were as foreign and distant to me as they’d be for UK or North American readers – and you don’t have to know anything about the RAF or specific German history to follow the plot. Many chapters use lenses like detective fiction or bad 1960s chapter books, archaic fairy tales, theological essays, semi-serious music reviews, lists and footnotes etc., and much of the fun comes from these pastiches/misappropriated, outdated speech styles and mash-ups. A translation into English would have to be VERY good to reflect both the humour, absurdity AND accuracy of the language. I loved these shoddy-but-skilful pastiches!

But should Witzel be translated? I’m not sure: I had a lovely reading experience and I’m incredulous that such an unwieldy, frilly, overwhelming book was awarded the German Book Prize… but many chapters were dragging on, and I often thought things like “You could scrap page 200 to page 300 completely – and the book would be better for it”. There are about four German people that I’d tell “Read this: It’s great!”, but I can see a lot of “The Wonder Years” fans or baby boomers flocking to this book only to abandon it angrily because of all the “pointless” pastiches/apophenia moments/the unsatisfying “Infinite Jest” atmosphere: post-Book Prize Amazon reviews tend to be harsh. Many recreational readers are disappointed and rated the book 1 star. I can see their point.

I wish there was a shorter version, and as a UK publisher, I’d definitely approach Frank Witzel and ask him if he’d be interested in excerpts/personal essays/a book about the Beatles etc. – he’s an Anglophile, and there are parts of tremendous interest for UK readers.

Also, strangely enough, there’s a US author who did a very similar satirical book about the RAF and German neuroses, Walter Abish [“How German is it”

I don’t know if Witzel and Abish know each other, but if there’s an audience for Abish, there’s an audience for Witzel (and vice versa). Abish’s novel was successful – so it would not be completely out of line to consider a translation of Witzel. But: it’s the most avant-garde title I’ve read in 2015, and while I’ve had fun, I’m not sure if his 98 satirical improvisations were worth 3 full days of my life. Wouldn’t 400 pages have been enough?

.


.

“Die Erfindung der Roten Armee Fraktion durch einen manisch-depressiven Teenager im Sommer 1969”, Frank Witzel, Matthes & Seitz

“Ein Spiegelkabinett der Geschichte im Kopf eines Heranwachsenden: Erinnerungen an das Nachkriegsdeutschland, Ahnungen vom Deutschen Herbst; das dichte Erzählgewebe ist eine explosive Mischung aus Geschichten und Geschichte, Welterklärung, Reflexion und Fantasie: ein detailbesessenes Kaleidoskop aus Stimmungen einer Welt, die 1989 Geschichte wurde. Ein mitreißender Roman, der den Kosmos der alten BRD wiederauferstehen lässt.” [Klappentext, gekürzt.]

Die Erfindung der Roten Armee Fraktion durch einen manisch-depressiven Teenager im Sommer 1969

.

Für “der Freitag” las ich alle sechs Romane auf der Shortlist zum deutschen Buchpreis 2015:

“Und was, falls dann doch Frank Witzel gewinnt? Für seinen brillant verquasten, übervollen, herrlich sperrigen Jugend- und Provinzroman Die Erfindung der Rote Armee Fraktion durch einen manisch depressiven Teenager im Sommer 1969? 800 Seiten Jugendängste, Wahn, 60er-Jahre-Jargon, Katholizismus und Neurosen, in 98 grellen Kapiteln immer neu gekreuzt, verschränkt. Literarische Apophänie: Was, wenn die Beatles Märtyrer wären? Mein Leben ein Schneider-Jugendbuch? Die RAF unser Kinderclub? Was, wenn dieses eigensinnige, wagemutige, bekloppte, brillante Buch Bestseller wird? Und Tagesgespräch?”

.

Der 800-Seiten-Roman spielt 1968 in einem Vorort von Wiesbaden und folgt einem 13jährigen, in 98 Kapiteln – von denen fast jedes anders klingt und viele einen parodistischen Quatsch-Tonfall haben, z.B. die Floskeln eines Jugendbuchs oder den Panik-Tonfall der RAF-Berichterstattung.

Es geht um Sprachmüll, BRD-Muff und die Armut, mit den falschen Worten etwas festhalten, ausdrücken, auf den Punkt bringen zu müssen – ein Gefühl, das 13jährige gut kennen. Der Roman ist sehr verspielt – jedes Kapitel ist eine literarische Versuchsanordnung, in dem Jargon (z.B. aus einer Musikzeitschrift) auf ein anderes Themenfeld (z.B. auf die Schule) getragen wird. So entsteht viel… wilder, windschiefer… Quatsch. abgegriffene Worte, in neuen, überraschenden Zusammenhängen.

Literarisch/psychologisch mach das viel Spaß: ein Junge, der als Messdiener jahrelang Gewäsch über Heilige und Märtyrer aufgesaugt hat und jetzt in Musikzeitschriften über die Beatles und in den Nachrichten über die RAF hört, spricht über die Beatles… wie über Märtyrer. Über die RAF… wie Popstars. Nicht als witziges Spiel – sondern aus Unvermögen: seltsame Welten werden durch die jeweils falschen Sprach- und Wahrnehmungsbrillen betrachtet. Die einzigen Brillen/Wortschätze eben, die der 13jährige bisher hat.

Warum ist das literarisch toll – und warum dauert es 800 Seiten? Weil Witzel noch etwas Größeres probiert/durchspielt/erzählt, das mich sehr überzeugt: Apophänie ist die Störung, Zusammenhänge und Leitmotive zu sehen: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apoph%C3%A4nie

…und die meisten Romane nehmen eine Figur, ein Stück Gegenwart oder Zeitgeschichte und ein paar Motive und sagen: “Schaut. Winnetou und die RAF – da sind schon Parallelen” oder z.B. “Dawson Leery und Stephen Spielberg: Das wird immer wieder interessant gegeneinander gestellt und hinterfragt – dieser All-American Idealismus.” Wir erzählen uns unsere Leben selbst in solchen Mustern, finden uns in Popkultur, ziehen Parallelen.

Witzel zieht 800 Seiten lang Parallelen, die IMMER beliebiger und absurder und wahnhafter werden und dabei zeigen: Solche Netze sind sehr schnell gesponnen. Aber dabei eben oft: spinnert. “Die Erfindung der Roten Armee Fraktion durch einen manisch-depressiven Teenager im Sommer 1968” setzt, versuchsweise, ALLES in Zusammenhang – auch, um dabei zu zeigen, wie leichtfertig und hilflos Menschen solche Zusammenhänge suchen, um sich ihr Leben zu erklären, und – Meta, Meta! – wie schnell Autor*innen solche Zusammenhänge zimmern können.

Wie gesagt: Ich finde es schwierig, ein Buch zu empfehlen, bei dem ich z.B. von Seite 200 bis 300 dachte “Hm. Das hätte man jetzt alles einfach streichen können.” Der Roman ist sehr lang, und ich weiß nicht, ob er Gelegenheits- und Hobbylesern genug gibt, über diese 800 Seiten hinweg. Versteht man erstmal, worum es geht – Lebenswelten in jeweils “falschen” Sprachwelten durchzunudeln, in immer anderen Kombinationen – passiert nicht mehr viel: es nudelt halt 99 Kapitel lang durch. sprachlich toll. aber einen packenden Plot oder besondere Auflösungen zum Schluss gibt es nicht.

.

Im Freitag (Link) schreibe ich:

“”Wer 2015 nur ein einziges Buch lesen kann, dem empfehle ich gestrost Jenny Erpenbeck, Gehen, ging, gegangen. Kosten: 19 Euro 99, Umfang: 352 Seiten. In kaum zehn Stunden Lesezeit bewältigt und verstanden. Simple Sprache. Viel Wissenswertes zu Asylrecht und Geflüchteten. Der Alltag afrikanischer Männer in einer Berliner Unterkunft, beäugt von einem skeptischen deutschen Professor in Rente. Altern, Heimatlosigkeit, DDR-Vergleiche. Kulturen im Dialog. Fünf von fünf Sternen. Lesenswert! Besonders auch für Schulklassen. Aber zählt dieser simple, muntere, gut gemeinte Asylroman zu den größten literarischen Leistungen 2015? Ist er buchpreiswürdig? […]

Egal, wer 2015 gewinnt: Favoritin Erpenbeck, Meister Witzel oder einer der holprigeren vier Titel: Keines dieser sechs angreifbaren, erstaunlich windschiefen Bücher im Finale passt gut zum Preis. Alle haben Angriffsflächen, große Schwächen. Peltzer, Witzel sind zu träge, Schwitter, Lappert zu seicht, Mahlke, Erpenbeck keine augenfällig „große“ Literatur. Ich will kein Buchhändler sein, der den Gewinner durchs Weihnachtsgeschäft bringt.”

.

Schlecht wie Joy Fielding: “Say Nothing”, Brad Parks (US-Thriller, 2017)

.

„Say Nothing“, Brad Parks

475 Seiten, Dutton / Penguin, März 2017

konventioneller Thriller / Domestic Supense

trotz Richter als Ich-Erzähler kein Legal-/Justiz-Thriller wie z.B. John Grisham

Rezensionen auf Goodreads (Link)

…vergleichbar mit u.a. Harlan Coben, Autor von “Tell No One” 

.

Mit 14 war ich in Angela verliebt. Sie las gerade Thriller von Joy Fielding. Also lieh ich mir Joy Fieldings „Lauf, Jane, lauf“… und hatte bis heute, mit Parks’ „Say Nothing“, nie wieder eine Thriller-Lektüre, während der ich mich so schlecht fühlte. Mit so wenig Genuss durch Kapitel hetzte:

Die Hauptfigur aus „Lauf, Jane, Lauf“ verliert ihr Gedächtnis, wird von einem Unbekannten bedroht und verbringt 400 Seiten, allen Menschen im Umfeld zu misstrauen: Ist ihr Mann, ihr Schwager, ihr Boss usw. der Stalker? Fielding schafft Spannung durch offene Fragen, die über Hunderte von Seiten nicht beantwortet werden – doch erzählerisch und stilistisch machen die Bücher keine Freude. Eine hypernervöse, meist untätige Erzählerin, die JEDEN verdächtigt. Umgeben von Figuren, so schwammig/widersprüchlich gezeichnet, dass alle der Schuldige/Stalker sein könnten.

Brad Parks’ „Say Nothing“ weckt die gleiche freudlose Stimmung: eine Trottel-Figur, akut bedroht. Umringt von Red Herrings/falschen Fährten. „Besser schnell zum Ende kommen: Dann ist das zähe Rätselraten wenigstens um.“ Auch viele Goodreads-Kritiken zu Harlan Cobens „Tell No One“ klingen so: Menschen, die das Buch nicht weglegen wollten – doch beim Lesen kaum Freude hatten.

.

Handlung:

Scott Sampson ist Mitte 40, Bundesrichter im (realen) Gloucester County, Virginia und seit über 20 Jahren mit seiner Collegeliebe Alison verheiratet. Die Zwillinge Sam und Emma sind sechs. Scott bekommt eine SMS von Alisons Nummer: Er muss die Kinder heute nicht aus der Kita holen. Er fährt direkt ins abgelegene Familienhaus am Wald – und wird von Alison gefragt, wo die Kinder sind. Jemand hat die Zwillinge entführt.

Via SMS erteilen die Kidnapper Scott Anweisungen, am nächsten Tag einen jungen Drogendealer freizusprechen: ein Text, nachdem sie wissen, dass sie Scott auch beruflich, als Richter, kontrollieren können. Das Buch schildert ca. 24 Tage aus der Sicht von Ich-Erzähler Scott, unterbrochen von kurzen, bewusst vagen, bedrohlichen auktorialen Kapiteln über zwei Handlanger (…zwei Brüder mit Bärten und diffus ausländischem Akzent) die Scotts Kinder bewachen und die Eltern auf verschiedenen Wegen einschüchtern und im Auge behalten sollen.

.

Brad Parks…

…geboren 1974, studierte in Dartsmouth, arbeitete als Journalist (vor allem Sport- und Crime-Artikel) und schrieb bisher sechs Romane über einen Reporter/Ermittler in New Jersey: einige Genre-Preise, doch schlechte Leserwertungen, kein deutscher Verlag:

Parks ist verheiratet, lebt selbst in Virginia und hat, wie Richter Scanlon, zwei junge Kinder: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brad_Parks

.

plausibler Ich-Erzähler:

Parks wirkt auf seiner Facebookseite und in Interviews recht goofy: nett, aber kein harter Knochen. Das gilt auch für Ich-Erzähler Scott: Der Federal Judge ist nicht mehr jung, nicht sehr attraktiv, die Haare fallen ihm aus. Er ist zwar klug und hat ein gesundes Selbstbewusstsein und eine gewisse Überheblichkeit (z.B. Arbeitern, Sekretärinnen, Angeklagten gegenüber), die mir für einen US-Richter plausibel scheint – doch er ist nicht eitel. Diese Erzählstimme ist das Beste am Buch: Ich hörte Scott gern zu – auch, wenn es seitenlang um Strafprozessordnung, Exposition/Backstory oder nervöse Spekulationen ging, und obwohl Scott keinen Glamour, keinen Humor, kein besonderes Charisma hat. Brad Parks wirkt wie ein kluger, netter Kerl, schlau, aber uncool und konventionell. Seine Hauptfigur übernimmt das. Und es klappt VIEL besser, klingt VIEL plausibler, sympathischer, angenehmer als in Thrillern mit psychologisch abgründigeren, exzentrischeren Ausnahme-Erzählern.

Bei „Say Nothing“ lese ich fast 500 Seiten tadellose, sympathische Erzählprosa, leicht verständlich, nicht literarisch, doch auch nicht niveaulos/zu flach, aus dem Mund einer angenehmen, plausiblen Figur. Das ist schon viel, in diesem Genre.

Nur fehlt „Say Nothing“ jede Kunstfertigkeit: ein Suspense-Thriller von der Stange, ohne größere Ambition.

.

.

Plot und Probleme:

Scott spricht ein Urteil im Sinn der Kidnapper und lässt den Kleindealer frei. Tritt damit aber eine Untersuchung/ein Impeachmentverfahren gegen sich los. Weil Scott gehorchte, wird Sohn Sam von den Kidnappern vor dem Gerichtsgebäude ausgesetzt.

Die folgenden zwei Wochen/350 Seiten ist nur noch Tochter Emma entführt – und Scott bereitet sich auf ein zweites, größeres Verfahren vor, zu dem die anonymen Entführer ihm ein Urteil vorgeben werden: Noch weiß Scott nicht, ob er für oder gegen den Kläger entscheiden soll. Entsprechend verdächtigt er sowohl den Kläger – einen Wissenschaftler/Tüftler/Biologen, der ein Enzym patentiert hat – als auch die Beklagten – einen Pharmakonzern, der ein Mittel zur Infarktprophylaxe auf den Markt bringen will, doch dabei wohl das Patentrecht verletzt.

[Diese Gerichts-Details sind interessant, plausibel, detailliert-aber-kurzweilig. Der Gerichtsfall selbst ist eher langweilig und endet in einem großen Antiklimax: Das Enzym des Biologen und das Enzym im Medikament unterscheiden sich in einem Detail, die Klage ist grundlos/hinfällig.]

Scott verdächtigt u.a.

  • den Anwalt des Biologen, und lässt ihn durch einen Privatdetektiv beschatten.
  • seine Mitarbeiter im Büro (die nichts von der Entführung wissen: schöne Konflikte/Spannungen).
  • seinen alten Mentor/Chef: einen Senator, der mit dem Pharmakonzern verbandelt ist.
  • die Nanny der Kinder: eine junge türkische Studentin, die sich vielleicht via Perücke als Alison verkleidet hat? Sam behauptet, er wurde am fraglichen Tag von seiner Mutter abgeholt.
  • Ehefrau Alison: hat sie ihre eigenen Kinder entführt? Ihr Ex-Freund arbeitet für den Pharmakonzern, und Scott hat Angst, dass sie mit ihm durchbrennen will. […eine begründete Angst für Genre-Leser: „Gone Girl“, der wichtigste Bestseller des Genres der letzten Jahre, hatte einen ähnlichen Plot.]

.

All diese Spannungsfelder/Ängste werden – recht holprig – als offene/rhetorische Fragen formuliert: „Kann ich Alison vertrauen? Sie verschwieg irgendwas. Ich fuhr ins Büro. Aber konnte ich dort noch jemandem trauen?“, seitenlang und immer wieder. Die 76 Kapitel sind recht kurz und monoton: einfach, szenisch und mit einem oft recht trashigen Cliffhanger, Dinge wie „Ich schlief und hatte Alpträume. Doch der schlimmste Alptraum sollte am nächsten Morgen beginnen, als der Wecker klingelte“ etc.

Es gibt zu viele Verdächtige, zu viele beliebige Konflikte, die zu lange immer weiter ohne Auflösung durchs Buch gezerrt werden (…wie durch eine TV-Serie, die zu viele Episoden hat und Wasser tritt). Die meisten Auflösungen kommen zu spät und sind hanebüchen/unterwältigend. Besonders, dass Alison so lange als Verdächtige gilt, schadet dem Buch: Scott zweifelt an seiner Ehefrau – und setzt einen Privatdetektiv auf eine sehr beliebige, nicht-sehr-verdächtige Randfigur an, statt auf Alison, die ihm viel größere Sorgen macht? Parks’ Jeder-ist-verdächtig-Erzählstruktur ist schon per se oft freudlos/frustrierend. Dass die „Say Nothing“-Hauptfigur aber dazu noch IMMER WIEDER viel zu träge handelt oder offensichtliche Spuren nicht verfolgt, frustriert viel mehr.

.

Tiefpunkt/Krux des Romans:

Zwei Kinder werden entführt. Die Entführer kommunizieren per Handy mit Scott – scheinen aber auch das Haus im Blick zu halten (Auflösung: mit kleinen Kameras, im nahen Wald in Bäume montiert). Scott vermutet, dass sein Handy überwacht wird. Scott vermutet, dass seine Frau in die Verschwörung verwickelt ist. Scott weiß, dass die Entführer Emma verstümmeln werden, wenn er sich an die Behörden wendet. Und: Als Sohn Sam wieder bei der Familie ist, muss er bewacht werden – denn wer kann verhindern, dass Sam sonst einfach wieder entführt wird?

Das waren für mich als Leser die größten Fragen und Spannungsfelder: Probleme, die Scott drei Wochen lang im Blick behalten muss, während er jeden Tag zur Arbeit geht und Normalität vorspielen muss. Scott geht nicht zur Polizei, aber…

  • weil seine Frau ihren beiden Schwestern sehr nahe steht, werden am Abend nach Sams Rückkehr erstmal neun Verwandte eingeladen, zum Weintrinken und Reden vor dem Haus?
  • Sam spielt alleine im Garten, Scott geht ins Haus und unterhält sich ausgiebig mit Alison, niemand hat jemals Angst, entführt, überwältigt zu werden.
  • Alison und Sam machen viele Ausflüge.
  • Scott googelt, telefoniert (mit dem möglicherweise überwachten Handy), heuert einen Detektiv an und bewegt sich sehr arglos durch die Stadt.
  • immer, wenn Scott seltsame Entscheidungen trifft, die z.B. Alison hinterfragen könnte/müsste, beschreibt Brad Parks lieber, dass einer der Eheleute ins Bett geht, eine Dusche nimmt etc.

.

Der Grundkonflikt des Romans ist so simpel – ich bin schockiert, dass Parks diesen „Familie, überwacht von Erpressern“-Plot an keiner Stelle plausibel zu Ende denkt: Wir alle kennen so viele Filme („Gegen die Zeit“) und Serien („24“), die das IMMER WIEDER neu auf die Spitze treiben. Bei Parks ist das Katz-und-Maus-Spiel zwischen lustlosen Entführern und lethargischen, kaum taktisch denkenden Eltern SO träge… Man will die ganze Zeit nur schimpfen, schreien – oder halt: schnell zum Ende kommen, endlich die Auflösung lesen.

.

Die Auflösung:

Weder Kläger noch Beklagter gaben die Entführung in Auftrag – sondern ein Star-Spekulant, der mit Termingeschäften und Hedge Funds Geld verdient (hanebüchen, langweilig, ein Antiklimax). Der Spekulant ist der Arbeitgeber von Scotts Schwager: Alisons Schwester und ihr Mann waren an der Entführung beteiligt und sind Maulwürfe. Scott und Alison gelingt es, Schwager und Star-Spekulant am Tag der Verhandlung mit einer Waffe zu bedrohen. Dann wollen sie den Spekulanten als Geisel gegen ihre Tochter tauschen.

Weil Alison Soldatentochter/Army Brat ist, kann sie mit Pistolen umgehen. Die Kidnapper sollen Emma freilassen (nebenbei: sie sind keine Türken, wie vermutet – sondern Deutsche. Spielt im Buch keine besondere Rolle. Doch ich fand es recht sympathisch und originell, dass die „strange men with beards and strange accents“ keine Araber o.ä. waren, sondern einfach bärtige Westler).

Alison wird bei einem Feuergefecht getötet. Das ist nicht SO tragisch, weil sie eh 80 Prozent des Buches nur geweint oder geschwiegen hat und zwielichtig/fadenscheinig wirkte. Mit der Entführung indes hatte sie nichts zu tun: Sie hat kurz DANACH erfahren, dass sie an Brustkrebs leidet und Scott alles verschwiegen. Als ihre Ärztin ihr sagt, dass sie bald sterben wird, opfert sie sich spontan für ihre Tochter. Schnarchiges Frauenbild, langweilige und überflüssige Wendung/Komplikation.

.

Fazit:

Hin und wieder gibt es handwerklich misslungene, mittelprächtige Thriller, die zu Bestsellern werden. Zuletzt z.B. „Girl on a Train“. Die Leser waren unzufrieden, die Kritiken waren schlecht – doch für ein paar Monate machte das Buch Geld. Ich bin sicher, man kann mit genug Werbung auch „Say Nothing“ zu einem solchen nicht-nachhaltigen, die-Leser-frustrierenden kurzfristigen Knallerbsen-Erfolg pushen: „Say Nothing“ ist ein Buch, mit dem z.B. Heyne gut Geld verdienen könnte.

Es gibt kein besonderes Lokalkolorit und keine literarischeren, atmosphärischen Passagen, keinen Lese-Anreiz für Menschen, die sonst keine Thriller lesen. Es gibt keine plausible Psychologie. Überall sind Logiklöcher. Das Buch ist flüssig und stellt Fragen. Doch Lesefreude hatte ich nach ca. 100 Seiten nicht mehr. Nur noch Ungeduld und Wut auf die Figuren und ihre undurchdachten Entscheidungen.

Zoran Drvenkar schreibt ähnliche Bücher in Deutschland. Drvenkars Romane sind viel blutiger und zynischer – politikverdrossen, voller Klischees, vage rechts. Es war schön, mal einen… hanebüchenen Thriller von der Stange zu lesen, bei dem ich nicht dachte: „Wow. Thriller werden von zynischen Menschenhassern geschrieben, für zynische Wutbürger.“ Also: Das alles könnte so viel schlimmer sein (Fitzeck usw.).

Brad Parks ist ein netter Kerl. Hauptfigur Scott hörte ich gerne zu.

Sinn machte das nicht. Spaß auch nicht. Aber vielleicht ist es in drei Jahren ein Kinofilm. Mit pointierterem, verbessertem Plot.

.

Harte Science-Fiction: mein Lieblingsautor Dietmar Dath

.

“Deutschlandfunk Kultur hat in der Woche ab 31.07. ein Special über „Ferne Welten“, also Leben außerhalb der Erde. Wir würden gern ein Gespräch über literarische Visionen/Utopien etc. führen”, schrieb mein Redakteur.

Literarische Utopien und Gesellschaftsentwürfe, die auf anderen Planeten spielen?

Ich machte mehrere Vorschläge: Ursula K. LeGuin, aktuelle “Star Wars”-Expanded-Universe-Romane, “A Wrinkle in Time”, Andreas Brandhorst.

Und, zwei Favoriten: Dietmar Dath – mein deutschsprachiger Lieblingsautor – sowie die wunderbare Comicreihe “Invisible Republic”.

.

Ich bin begeistert, dass ich beides vorstellen darf – am 31. Juli, um kurz nach 10, im Literaturmagazin Lesart.

Heute, hier im Blog: ein paar grundsätzliche Notizen, Empfehlungen, Gedanken zum Thema:

.

grundsätzlich:

Die erste “Star Trek”-Serie ab 1966 zeigte oft einen neuen, fremden Planeten pro Episode. Eine Welt, in der alle Erwachsenen tot sind; eine Welt, die aussieht wie das Chicago der 30er Jahre etc. Das ist oft dümmlich: weil Gesellschaften und ganze Planeten nicht DERART homogen sind. Statt eine Welt zu entwerfen mit verschiedenen Kulturen, Schichten, Kontinenten, Werten, Schwerpunkten, stehen Kirk und Spock in… simplen, sehr einseitigen “Monokulturen”. TV Tropes nennt das “Planet of Hats”: Welten, auf denen alle Bewohner*innen den selben “Hut” zu tragen scheinen und sich über die selben ein, zwei Werte und Eigenschaften definieren.

Eine Ursache: Besonders ab den ca. 50er Jahren orientierte sich erfolgreiche Sci-Fi oft an Western. “Star Trek” z.B. wurde als “Wagon Train to the Stars” gepitcht: Planwagen, allein in der Prärie, umgeben von Indianerstämmen. Sheriff und Ordnungshüter, die hübsche Tochter des Häuptlings, Wilde, die es zu befrieden galt etc. Ich denke an “Avatar” und “Der mit dem Wolf tanzt”, oder viele Kinderserien der 80er, mit denen ich aufwuchs: “Saber Rider”, “Brave-Starr”, “Galaxy Rangers”.

“Star Wars” begann als Märchen und Samurai-Geschichte. Auch hier spielte Politik in fremden Zivilisationen, feinere Gesellschaftsentwürfe auf einzelnen Planeten etc. bis ca. “Angriff der Klonkrieger” (2002) keine besonders große Rolle. Es gab Ritter und Cowboys, Aliens und Prinzessinnen – doch wenig Versuche, tatsächlich zu beantworten: “Wie organisiert sich eine Menschheit mit neuen technischen Mitteln, und im kulturellen Mit- und Gegeneinander mit anderen Lebensformen?” [Das ist heute, in den Comics und Romanen des Expanded Universe, VIEL besser: “Star Wars” ist seit 2015 so politisch und komplex wie nie zuvor.]

Ich sage nicht: Sci-Fi war damals unpolitisch oder interessierte sich nicht genug für Aliens in ihren Rollen als “das Andere”. Doch diese Rollen blieben oft SO allegorisch oder märchenhaft oder allgemein, dass ich, als Kulturwissenschaftler, bis in die 90er Jahre selten sagen kann: “Yeah! Hier hat jemand eine Alien-Zivilisation oder verschiedene Gesellschaftsentwürfe der Erde mit großem Respekt und besonderer Tiefe… ziseliert.” Zu oft blieben es einfach [der kolonialistische Blick auf] Indianer etc. im Weltall: Kulturen, so eingleisig und eindimensional präsentiert, dass ich als Zuschauer fast IMMER denken sollte: Menschen sind bunter, Menschen haben eine größere Bandbreite, ihr Aliens könnt von Menschen viel lernen.

Ein Stichwort, eine Genre-Bezeichnung, die hilft, Autor*innen zu finden, die soziologischer und komplexer denken: “Hard Sci-Fi“.

.

Ich dachte lange, das meint: Romane, die besonders weit in der Zukunft spielen oder dabei besonders technisch-futuristisch sind.

Stimmt nicht:

.

Es geht nicht um besondere Fortschrittlichkeit. Sondern darum, so wissenschaftlich wie möglich zu bleiben. Auch z.B. “Gravity”, “The Martian”, “Gattaca”, “Westworld” [Kritik von mir], “Contact” (alle: nicht besonders weit in der Zukunft) gehören ins Genre. Wichtiges Kriterium: Autor*innen versuchen, möglichst nah an bestehenden Theorien zu… extrapolieren.

Simple Kriterien sind z.B. “Kann man hier Explosionen im All hören?” (im Vakuum hört man nichts) oder “Wie kommunizieren Planeten/Schiffe, die Lichtjahre voneinander entfernt sind?” (bitte nicht: in Skype-Optik, ohne Zeitverzögerung).

.

Ich möchte vorstellen:

1) die Comicreihe “Invisible Republic” von Corinna Bechko und Gabriel Hardman (erscheint seit 2015)

2) drei besonders futuristische Romane von Dietmar Dath: “Feldeváye” (2014), “Venus siegt” (2015) und “Der Schnitt durch die Sonne” (2017)

Sowohl Dath als auch Bechko/Hardman schreiben “Hard Sci-Fi”: Sie recherchieren viel, und zeigen die Recherche im Erzählen: Dath fügt Zitate, Diagramme, Wissenschaftstheorien, kleine Essays ein, macht sehr viel naturwissenschaftliches Namedropping; Corinna Bechko schreibt für jede Ausgabe “Invisible Republic” kurze Essays mit Zusatzinformationen über z.B. die Tierwelt ihrer Planeten.

Wichtige Vorläufer: Isaac Asimov (der viel über Roboter und deren Ethik schrieb), der Suhrkamp-Klassiker “Picknick am Wegesrand” oder Kim Stanley Robinsons Mars-Trilogie.

Heute wichtig: Neal Stephenson, Greg Egan, die politische TV-Serie (und deren Romanvorlagen) “The Expanse”, die Dystopien der TV-Serie “Black Mirror”, die Comicreihen “Trees” und “Injection” von Warren Ellis (beides nicht besonders wissenschaftlich, doch sehr soziologisch: Was macht Technologie mit Menschen?); und, in Deutschland, Heyne-Autor Andreas Brandhorst.

Ein Nebenaspekt, eine Besonderheit in Deutschland: “Perry Rhodan” würde ich nicht “Hard Sci-Fi” nennen – doch die Sprache dort ist sehr komplex und bildreich, und es geht oft um möglichst originelle oder paradoxe Ideen in Sachen Transport, Kosmos, Zusammenleben. Literarisch bleibt mir das zu flach (und: beamtenhaft, trocken). Trotzdem gibt es bei Rhodan IRRSINNIG schöne Worte. Sowohl Dath als auch Andreas Brandhorst sehen den Reiz solcher Worte – und probieren, diese spezifisch deutschen “Perry Rhodan”-Funkel-Neologien auf ein höheres erzählerisches Level zu hieven. Bücher also, in denen Worte wie “Schattenspiegel” und “schwarzes Eis” fallen, in denen sich Menschen auf “Tafeln” abspeichern können. In einem Dath-Roman sprechen Menschen nur von der “Wiege”, wenn sie das Sonnensystem meinen – weil die Menschheit längst weiter ist. Das ist sprachlich/klanglich oft sehr suggestiv und schön. Mich freut jedes Mal, wenn jemand diese Stärke von “Rhodan” aufgreift und ausbaut.

.

1) zu “Invisible Republic”:

– US-Comics erscheinen meist monatlich, als 20seitige Hefte. Fünf bis sechs Hefte erzählen einen Akt einer größeren Geschichte und werden fast immer als Sammelband noch einmal neu veröffentlicht. Von “Invisible Republic” erschienen seit 2015 15 Hefte, zusammengefasst in drei Sammelbänden. Die Reihe ist auf 30 Hefte/sechs Sammelbände angelegt und macht gerade einige Monate Pause. Gabriel Hardman und Corinna Bechko sind verheiratet. Sie schreiben zusammen, Hardman selbst zeichnet dann allein, die Farben der Zeichnungen sind von Jordan Boyd.

– Der Comic spielt auf Avalon, einem Mond, von Menschen besiedelt. Eine sehr industrielle Welt, deren Städte an Osteuropa erinnern und an die 70er und 80er Jahre. Die letzten 40 Jahre herrschte dort ein Diktator, Arthur McBride. Das Regime wurde zerschlagen – doch ähnlich wie im postsowjetischen Russland gibt es trotz Aufbruchsstimmung viel Misstrauen, Zynismus, Korruption. Hauptfigur ist ein recht feiger, überforderter und glanzloser Redakteur und Whistleblower, Croger Babbs. Er findet das Tagebuch der (in den Geschichtsbüchern nie erwähnten) Cousine von Arthur McBride, Maia – und wägt ab, es zu veröffentlichen.

– Auf einer zweiten Zeitebene, über 40 Jahre zuvor, lesen wir in Maias eigener Sprache, als unzuverlässige Erzählerin, wie Maia und Arthur als… linksextreme junge Revolutionäre gegen einen Polizeistaat arbeiten. Maia ist pazifistisch, romantisch-jugendlich. Arthur voller Ideale, aber grausam. Auch die heutige Maia taucht auf: als Realpolitikerin, zynische Rebellin, Terroristin? Ist sie gewachsen – oder heute ebenso brutal und korrumpiert wie ihr Bruder?

– Die große Stärke von “Invisible Republic”: Man hätte eine solche Geschichte über den Prager Frühling erzählen können, über die kubanische Revolution, vielleicht sogar über die RAF. Durch das fiktive Setting aber fehlt alle Romantik, die sonst bei solchen Biografien mitschwingt: Die Gegenwart auf Avalon wirkt trostlos (doch ohne, dass ich dabei sagen müsste “Oha – wie dümmlich und fortschrittsverdrossen: Glauben die Autoren, der Prager Frühling war SCHÖNER als die Gegenwart?”), und die Missstände der Vergangenheit kann ich beim Lesen nicht wegerklären mit “Na ja: Es war eben eine andere, einfachere Ära. Es gab nicht einmal Internet.”

– In fast allen Ausgaben fügt Corinna Bechko kurze Essays an über z.B. Space Elevators, kolonialistisches Essen oder künstliche Schwerkraft. Im Design, Jargon und vielen kleinen Momenten gibt sich die Serie immer wieder Mühe, zu zeigen: “Das hier spielt Hunderte Jahre in der Zukunft, in einer fremden Kultur.” Doch statt… Fortschritts- oder Technikeuphorie dreht sich “Invisible Republic” um all die Mechanismen, mit den Politik immer wieder neue Ungerechtigkeit produziert oder in Kauf nimmt – oft trotz der besten Absichten. Man kann die Misstände der Gegenwart erst verstehen, wenn man nachsieht, was der Ursprungs-Plan der Entscheider*innen war… und, was dann unterwegs schief ging.

– Erzählt man solche zynische Geschichten über z.B. die DDR, wird es schnell bitter oder ideologisch. Autor*innen schlagen sich auf eine Seite: Sie feiern das Früher oder das Heute. Deshalb: sehr gut, auf einen Mond auszuweichen! Und: charmant, dass dieser Mond an vielen Stellen europäisch wirkt, und sich Hardman z.B. von Architektur auf Malta inspirieren ließ.

Sehr gute Zusammenfassung des politischen Settings (Kenia Santos, Word of the Nerd):

“2843: Dictator Arthur McBride’s Mallory regime ruled Avalon (one of Asan’s moons once called Maidstone) for years. His fall threw the world into chaos. Discredited reporter Croger Babb finds a journal written by Arthur’s cousin Maia Reveron, which details a dark, untold story. Invisible Republic is the title given to Maia’s journal, written during her time as a political prisoner in Newgate Prison. Maia’s narrative goes all the way back to when Arthur and her worked in an algae farm as indentured servants, their escape, an incident at Rock Beach that changed the course of their lives forever, the years spent with the rebels and it’s likely to cover the events that led her cousin to imprison her.

Avalon and Kent orbit planet Asan. Avalon was colonized by a generation ship and built from the ground up. The moon was a colony for Asan and a source of crops that couldn’t grow there, such as almonds, honey, and greens.  But then the colonial government was relocated to sister moon Kent and its geographical distance led to the Civil War on Asan. Avalon’s children were sent to Asan to fight as soldiers, and Arthur’s proposal was that of fighting for freedom under the flag of a unified Avalon to be no longer ruled by the elite of Kent.”

.

.

2) zu Dietmar Dath:

– Dath ist mein deutschsprachiger Lieblingsautor. Ich mag seine Leidenschaft, seine Neugier, seine Experimentierfreude und die Lust daran, immer wieder sehr disparate Kultur und Theorien zusammen zu bringen und neu zusammen zu denken.

– Ich las etwa zehn Bücher von ihm (von über 20) und empfehle “Dirac”, “Waffenwetter”, “Für immer in Honig” und ein Langessay über “Buffy – im Bann der Dämonen”: “Sie ist wach. Über ein Mädchen, das hilft, schützt und rettet”.

.

Dath schrieb ca. fünf größere Sci-Fi-Romane:

  • 2008: “Abschaffung der Arten” (ist am bekanntesten und beliebtesten, Shortlist zum deutschen Buchpreis 2009. Ich las es nicht: Es spielt in naher Zukunft auf der Erde und passt, glaube ich, nicht hier ins Thema)
    .
  • 2012: “Pulsarnacht” (passt ins Thema, doch hat die schlechtesten Kritiken und Leserwertungen aller Dath-Romane. Es erschien bei Heyne, nicht wie sonst bei Suhrkamp. Nicht gelesen. ZEIT-Rezension von Dennis Senzel)
    .
  • 2014: “Feldevaýe” (ein 800-Seiten-Suhrkamp-Taschenbuch mit durchwachsenen Kritiken, gelesen)
    .
  • 2015: “Venus siegt” (im Kleinverlag Hablizel, 150 Seiten längere Neuausgabe bei Fischer TOR; gelesen und 2015 von mir für Der Freitag besprochen: https://www.freitag.de/autoren/smesch/erzaehlen-meister)
    .
  • 2017: “Der Schnitt durch die Sonne” (S. Fischer, gelesen; erscheint erst Ende August)

.

a) DER SCHNITT DURCH DIE SONNE

…trägt enttäuschend wenig zum Thema bei: Hier gibt’s eine hochentwickelte, 2017 noch unentdeckte Zivilisation auf der Sonne, die erst seit ca. 1945 das Leben auf der Erde für halbwegs relevant, beobachtenswert hält. Als eine Art Bürgerkrieg/Konflikt auf der Sonne ausbricht, wird das Bewusstsein von fünf (nicht, wie im Klappentext: sechs) Menschen vom Sonnenwesen Teiresias in die Sonne übertragen. Dort sollen sie verschiedene Aufgaben lösen und an Projekten arbeiten.

– Das Buch erscheint am 24. August 2017. Deshalb noch keine Kritik/Besprechung von mir hier im Blog. Nur kurz, in Sachen “andere Zivilisationen”:

Über die Sonnenzivilisation und ihre Absichten erfährt man arg wenig. Die Wesen auf der Sonne sind so weit entwickelt, dass die menschlichen Hauptfiguren die ganze Zeit in Sinnbildern, Simulationen, künstlichen Metaphern-Environments bleiben: eine mysteriöse Insel mit Strand, Urwald und Monster wie in der Serie “Lost”, kleine Häuser, Küchen und Labors. TV Tropes nennt das “a form you are comfortable with”. Menschen als Versuchskaninchen höherer Mächte – etwas, für das wirklich jede dritte “Star Trek”-Episode seit 1966 GENAU DIESE Bilder und Metaphern findet.

.

b) FELDEVÁYE

…spielt Jahrhunderte (-tausende?) in der Zukunft und ist lose verknüpft mit u.a. “Abschaffung der Arten”, “Venus siegt” und der übersinnlichen Dath-Figur Cordula Späth, die schon seit seinem Debüt 1995, “Cordula killt dich”, in vielen seiner Bücher mysteriöse Gastauftritte hat. Im Großen steht das Buch aber für sich.

– Die Menschheit hat das Sonnensystem, ihre “Wiege”, vor langer Zeit aus eigener Kraft überwunden und die komplette Milchstraße besiedelt. Sie kann das eigene Bewusstsein in digitalen Backups (“Tafeln”) speichern, die Geldwirtschaft ist abgeschafft, es gibt Kontakt zu ca. sechs verschiedenen Alien-Zivilisationen. Besonders Kunst gilt als “überwunden”: Es scheint niemandem mehr ein Bedürfnis, Kulturgüter zu produzieren. Auf dem abgelegenen Planeten Feldeváye erscheinen immer wieder Kunstwerke der Menschheit – in grünes Licht verpackt, “Flammen” genannt – die von menschlichen “Flammenjägern” gesammelt und dann in der “Auswertung” katalogisiert und ausgestellt werden. Diese Kunstwerke werden von Aliens, den Menneskern, über die Welt verteilt – ein hochentwickeltes Volk, dem die Menschheit viel Fortschritt und neue Technologien verdankt.

– Der Roman folgt Flammenjägerin Kathrin Ristau, die sich fragt, was die Mennesker die Menschen lehren wollen, indem sie alte Kunst auf den Planeten streuen. Ristau schreibt vielbeachtete Essays und inspiriert damit andere Bürger*innen, neue Kunst zu schaffen: Sie lebt in einer utopischen Kommune in einem fröhlichen Baumhaus, doch im Lauf der Jahre zahlen ihre Partnerinnen und ihr Kind einen hohen Preis, weil Ristau von den Machteliten immer neu gejagt, manipuliert und abgedrängt wird. Ein befreundeter Genetiker bringt Schlangen bei, sich nach quantenmechanischen Gesetzen durch Raum und Zeit zu bewegen: Die Schlangen werden hochintelligent, lernen Fliegen, überflügeln die Menschheit und sind – falls ich das richtig verstand – die Mennesker. In einer Nebenhandlung holt eine Partisanin sich selbst aus dem Zeitstrom, um mit Hunderten Kopien die Geschichte neu zu schreiben.

– “Feldeváye” hat großartige Ideen, eine tolle Grundfrage (Wie hängen Kunst und Zivilisation zusammen?), markante Figuren und Settings. Doch der Roman springt in jedem Kapitel zu einer anderen Figur, und oft weiß man erst nach 20, 30 Seiten vage, wie das ins große Ganze passt: ALLES Wichtige aus Kathrins Geschichte spielt zwischen den Zeilen, wird in Nebensätzen angerissen. Kriege brechen aus und enden, ohne, dass ich als Leser den Handelnden nah genug komme: Ein Buch, das mich auf drei Armlängen Abstand hält, die größten Wendungen lapidar runtererzählt und eine eh schon komplizierte Welt durch das Hin und Her der Perspektiven viel zu kompliziert macht. Ich denke an David Foster Wallace, der zwischendurch 70 Seiten Fußnoten einstreut: In “Feldeváye” fühlt man sich wie in den Apokryphen oder Wikipedia-Einträgen der eigentlichen Geschichte: immer zu spät, zu weit weg, unnütz am Rand.

– Ich brauchte drei Tage für 800 Seiten, doch kann viele der grundsätzlichsten Fragen nicht beantworten: Warum schaffte sich Kunst ab, und warum kehrt sie durch Kathrins Engagement zurück? Warum funktionieren Tafeln nicht richtig (….und dann aber etwas VIEL Komplexeres: eine Nebenfigur, die sich aus drei Tafel-Bruchstücken fügt)? Wie hat die Partisanin die Zeitlinie verändert, und wie die Schlangen? Und: obwohl hier wirklich ganze Galaxien miteinander interagieren, geht alles Wichtige von Kathrin, ihrem Vater und einem Freund der Familie, Klemens, aus. Figuren, die 800 Seiten lang Nebenrolle und Randfigur ihres eigenen Epos’ bleiben. Ich kenne kein Buch, das solchen Aufwand betreibt, sich SOLCHE Mühe gibt, Lesern immer wieder die Tür ins Gesicht zu schlagen.

.

.

c) VENUS SIEGT

…spielt in derselben Erzählwelt wie “Feldeváye”, aber wesentlich früher: Hier kam die Menschheit noch nicht übers Sonnensystem hinaus, machte nur durch Terraforming u.a. Mars und Venus bewohnbar. Nick Helander, Sohn eines Funktionärs, hadert mit der Venus-Regentin und weiteren Politikern und rutscht in einen kalten Krieg zwischen Menschen, Robotern und körperlosen künstlichen Intelligenzen.

– Ich bin etwas enttäuscht, weil “Venus siegt” 2015 eine sehr markante Lektüre für mich war, ich aber auf jeder Seite dachte “DAS kann Dath noch besser!”. Jetzt, noch “Feldeváye” und “Der Schnitt durch die Sonne”, fürchte ich: Nein – fürs Erste ist “Venus siegt” das lesens- und empfehlenswerteste Buch aus dieser Reihe. Es krankt an den selben Problemen wie die zwei anderen Titel: In fast jeder Szene erklären sich zwei Figuren die Welt, in sokratischen, künstlich-gewollt-leblosen Dialogen. Ich habe das Gefühl, wesentliche Szenen zu verpassen oder mich mit den falschen Fragen aufhalten zu müssen. Und Jargon, Begriffe etc. werden mir entweder viel zu spät erklärt oder (nur bei “Venus siegt”): durch ein Glossar SO hingeknallt, dass ich mir den Roman verderbe, falls ich das vorher durcharbeite.

– Wikipedia sagt: Die Figuren sind eindeutig Stalin, Lenin, Trotzki und Hitler nachempfunden. Ich sah beim Lesen Parallelen – doch glaube nicht, dass man dem originellen, atmosphärischen, sehr eigenen Roman einen Gefallen tut, wenn man ihn auf “Politik des 20. Jahrhunderts, in fancy Sci-Fi-Verkleidung” reduziert.

.

mein Grundproblem bei Dath:

Ich empfehle und verschenke die Bücher oft – doch bisher gab es nur zwei Freunde, die sagten “Doch, danke. Gern gelesen!”

Der Rest quälte sich und kann meine Begeisterung nicht nachvollziehen.

(Eine Ausnahme, viel zugänglicher: “Alles fragen, nichts fürchten”, ein Interview mit Dath auf Buchlänge von 2011. Das las auch meine Mutter, und fand es herrlich. Wer Dath kennen lernen will: am besten so.)

Jedes Mal aber, wenn ich sage “Das ist unnötig sperrig”, “Das hat zu viel Jargon”, “Das WILL Hollywood-Breitbild-Spannung, doch baut Szenen oft viel zu hölzern”, schimpft jemand “Du hast es nur nicht verstanden!” oder “Du willst es kindisch mundgerecht!”

2015, nach meiner “Feldeváye”-Rezension im Freitag, schrieb Dath selbst in der FAZ, an meiner Hildesheimer Schreibschule hätte man uns wohl verboten, so zu schreiben: Offenbar fände ich sein Erzählen regelwidrig/nicht konform genug. Uff. Nein. Ich finds nur unnötig verblasen, hermetisch.

.

Hör mir auf mit Dietmar Dath! „So einer hockt in jedem Dorf – an jeder Bushaltestelle: der Junge, der Science-Fiction liest. Comics, Groschenhefte. Die Nachbarn schwärmen ‚Wie talentiert!‘, die Lehrer ‚Allerhand!‘, die Eltern ‚Ein Unikat!‘. Doch zum Abitur dann trotzdem nur ein Notenschnitt von 1,7. Eigenbrötler. Verblasener Autodidakt. Selbstbewusst – aber immer nur halb fertig!“

Hanns-Josef Ortheil schimpfte so, 2007: Wir beide gaben ein Seminar über junge Literatur. Ich schwärmte von Dath – bis heute ein Lieblingsautor. Doch Ortheil, Institutsleiter meiner Hildesheimer Schreibschule, schien entnervt wie nie: Seit 1995 schreibt Dath Romane, Essays, Kritiken, Graphic Novels und Lyrik über Buffy und Death Metal, die KPD und Lost, den Südschwarzwald und Quantenmechanik. Ein Mathe-, Physik-, Pop-, Hermeneutik- und Polit-Liebhaber, der wilder, weiter denken, spinnen, kreuzen, belehren und überraschen will als die viel schnittigeren eingleisigen Experten.

Seit 2001, als Dath von der Musikzeitschrift Spex ins Feuilleton der FAZ wechselte; seit 2005, als er unter anderem bei Suhrkamp verlegt wurde, erklären Germanisten-Seriösis gern: „Hier kritisiert einer den konservativen Backlash im grün-alternativen Bürgertum. Und Zombies packt er gleich dazu. Als Bonus. Starke Metapher!“ Oder: „Es geht um Schöpfung und Kontrolle: Künstler als politische Subjekte. Aber trashig-farbenprächtig illustriert und ausgeschmückt. Bittere Pillen, hochbrisant! Genre, Entertainment, Subkultur, das ist Daths Zuckerglasur. Drunter ist Furor!“

In Venus siegt, Daths 18. Roman, hakt diese Teilung: Zwar trifft, wie meist, Phantastik auf Politik und Aufklärung. Es geht um Roboter, Terraforming, Transhumanismus und Verteilungskriege zwischen den Planeten des Sonnensystems nah am 30. Jahrhundert. Es geht, noch stärker, um Planwirtschaft, politikverdrossene Eliten, mathematische Kategorien- und Topostheorie und um den Machterhalt der stursten, zähsten, trockensten Regentin seit Angela Merkel.

Leona Christensen herrscht über die Venus – den einzigen Planeten, auf dem Roboter, Menschen und freie, körperlose Computerintelligenzen gleichberechtigt im kollektiven „Bundwerk“ rechnen, schuften und dämmern. Ich-Erzähler Nick Helander, Sohn von Leonas rechter Hand, trifft als Attaché Bauern und Kolchose-Robos, Forscher und Aussteiger, Künstler, Funktionäre und unfassbar komplizierte Programme. Er disputiert mit jedem Dialogpartner in seitenlangem Hin und Her und steht schnell vor der Frage: Ist das noch Fortschritt oder schon Regression? Leben wir in einer freien, gerechten Welt? Oder schafft Übermutter „Lily“ eine Diktatur?

Ich las noch keinen Dath-Roman, der sich mehr vorgenommen hat – und selten je ein Buch, für das ich mir weniger Leser vorstellen kann: Ein Kind des Regimes bemerkt, dass plötzlich alles raucht und glüht. Lady Oscar auf der Venus. Great! Doch 100 erste Seiten lang wird nur doziert. 100 letzte Seiten lang brennt die Welt, lapidar und lustlos weggequatscht, literarisch, psychologisch, dramaturgisch hohl. Dazwischen liegt ein leidlich interessanter, atmosphärischer Mittelteil von 90 Seiten. Ein Bruchstück, das provokante Fragen stellt – vorausgesetzt, man überspringt das übergenaue Personenregister, die Klappentexte und Inhaltsangaben.

Bert Brecht schrieb Stücke, die immer wieder klemmten, stoppten, die Gesellschaft aus dem Takt reißen wollten. Ayn Rand schrieb vulgärliberale Traktate, getarnt als Romane: Figurenpsychologie? Egal. Alles nur politisches Gleichnis, Illustration! Thesen werden ausgewalzt in Rede und Gegenrede. Venus siegt steht in dieser didaktischen, freudlosen Tradition: künstliche Sonnen? Fliegende Städte? Trotzdem null sense of wonder: Nichts begeistert. Niemand staunt. Kaum Charme, kein Tempo. Tief im System trifft der wohl langweiligste Mensch der Venus, Nick Helander, wechselnde Stimmen. Alle klingen gleich und reden seitenlang im Stil und Tonfall von Dietmar Dath. Redner statt Rechner. Planet der Laffen: ein Dathoversum voller IT-Kommunisten, in dem trotz aller Zahleneuphorie nur die dathigsten Ansprachen der allerdathigsten Großrhetoriker den Lauf der Welt entscheiden.

Cory Doctorow, ein ähnlich brechtianischer Sci-Fi-Autor und Gesellschaftskritiker, fragte sich, wie sehr das Netz seine Texte verändert. Seit man jedes Stichwort, jeden Namen googeln kann, sieht er sich nicht mehr in der Pflicht, alles Material, auf das sein Schreiben baut, im Text selbst zu erklären. Wer Fragen hat, soll googeln. Dietmar Dath geht eine Potenz weiter: Vielleicht ist Venus siegt ein solides Buch – sobald man fünf Semester Informatik studiert hat.

„Verblasener Autodidakt!“ Hanns-Josef Ortheils Dath-Wut traf bei mir einen Nerv. Ich wuchs als Comic-Eigenbrötler auf, im Dorf. Mein Abi-Schnitt ist 1,7. Mit Texten versuche ich selten, den Hauptpreis zu gewinnen. Besser: erst mal Kategorien sprengen. Erwartungen überrumpeln! So überraschend denken, kreuzen, spinnen, dass mir ein Sonderpreis eingerichtet wird. Venus siegtaber ist der erste Dath-Roman, bei dem ich fürchte: Was, wenn sich Dath jetzt immer einsamer, tiefer verschrullt? Für eine Handvoll Dorf-Nerds schreibt? Schiefe, kunstlose Ideologietraktate? „Erzählt“ wird hier kaum besser als bei Ayn Rand.

„Kannst du noch mal erklären, was dich an Dath stört?“, frage ich Ortheil; denn acht Jahre alte Zitate aus dem Gedächtnis sind nicht fair. „Mir fehlt da Gründlichkeit: Themen werden aufgetan und zu schnell abgehakt. Wenn jemand sagt: ‚Nicaragua. Da müsste man mal recherchieren, lernen, verstehen!‘, hebt Dath den Finger, als hätte er schon 2005 alles Wichtige gesagt, über Nicaragua. Oder über Genetik. Oder über jedes andere Thema, das gerade aufkommt.“

Im Genre der Hard-Sci-Fi – naturwissenschaftlich, nüchtern, theoretisch – wird oft eine „Singularität“ verhandelt: Der Punkt, an dem Computer die Rechenleistung menschlicher Hirne überholen. Kann dann Bewusstsein abgebildet werden, digital? Können Erinnerungen gespeichert werden, geteilt, getauscht? Körper gewechselt? Venus siegt zeigt künstliche Intelligenz auf entsprechendem Niveau. Doch typische Auswirkungen auf Konzepte wie „Menschlichkeit“ und „Bewusstsein“ fehlen hier. Das Buch sollte klügere Fragen stellen über Seelen, Körper, Kollektive. Ich fühle mich wie in einem Politroman über 2015, in dem zwar Dampfmaschinen laufen, doch die Dampflok sich nie recht durchsetzen konnte. Eine ungefähre Welt. Selbstbewusst – aber nur halb fertig. Kein Sonderpreis. Kein Hauptpreis. Und: Was Lady Oscar ist, erkläre ich jetzt nicht. Kann jeder googeln.

.

.

große, grundsätzliche Fragen, die Hard Sci-Fi immer wieder durchspielt:

– Die Menschen schicken Raumschiffe an Ziele, mehrere Lichtjahre entfernt: An Bord leben und sterben oft ganze Generationen. DANN wird Reisen in Überlichtgeschwindigkeit erfunden: die neuen Schiffe überholen die alten und sind vor ihnen am Ziel. Ein Konflikt in u.a. “Feldeváye” und “Invisible Republic”: Menschen aus Generationenschiffen als Abgehängte, Gestrige, Modernisierungsverlierer. Dazu die Zeitparadoxa: Leute in Kältekammern, die Jahrzehnte verschlafen. Familien oder Liebespaare, deren biologische “Eigenzeit” plötzlich weit auseinander klafft.

– Die “Singularität”: Sobald Computer komplexer werden als menschliche Gehirne, könnten Gehirne eingescannt und abgespeichert werden. Sind Menschen damit unsterblich? Kann man den Körper wechseln, Bewusstsein kopieren, mehrere Körper zugleich steuern etc.? Und: schulden die überlegenen Maschinen den Menschen dann noch etwas – oder sind sie der logische nächste Schritt, evolutionär?

– Körper, Gender, Roboterrechte, Transhumanismus: In “Feldeváye” wechseln viele Hauptfiguren mehrmals das Geschlecht, die meisten sind bisexuell. Welche Rolle spielt es in einer solchen Gesellschaft, ob jemand ein Roboter ist, eine künstliche Intelligenz, ein Mann, eine Frau?

– Mangel: Mit starken Energiequellen kann fast jeder Mangel überwunden werden. Wer arbeitet dann noch, und für wen? Dath – ein Marxist – spielt in vielen Büchern mit der Frage, ob Krieg, Macht, Ausbeutung verschwinden können, sobald alle Grundbedürfnisse gedeckt sind.

– Die Pädagogik von Aliens: Filme wie “Arrival” (noch nicht gesehen) erinnern, wie fremdartig Aliens denken, kommunizieren. In Hard Sci-Fi heißt das oft, dass Menschen vor einem Artefakt, einer Weisung, einer Technologie stehen (z.B. dem Monolith aus “2001 – Odyssee ins Weltall”) und sich fragen: “Ist das eine Botschaft an uns? Ein Werkzeug? Was sollen wir damit? Ist das Pädagogik – oder nur der Abfall, den eine höhere Zivilisation nach dem Picknick auf der Wiese liegen ließ – und wir sind die Ameisen?”

.

zum Abschluss: ein schönes Poetik- und Sci-Fi-Zitat aus “Der Schnitt durch die Sonne”

.


.

hier noch mein kurzer Fazit-Text, geschrieben für die Website von Deutschlandfunk Kultur:

.

Traumwelten, hochpolitisch
Literatur auf fremden Planeten – gesellschaftskritisch und kitschfrei: Dietmar Dath und “Invisible Republic”

.

Maia Reveron sitzt im Gefängnis, als politische Gefangene: Ihr Cousin Arthur ließ sie verschwinden – nachdem er Staatschef wurde, alle Gegner in Säuberungen attackierte. In ihrer Jugend schufteten Maia und Arthur auf einer Farm, träumten vom besseren Leben, liefen fort. Dann erschlug Arthur einen Soldaten, wurde politisch aktiv. Maia wollte Texte schreiben gegen das Regime. Arthur legte lieber Bomben.

Der Comic, der Maias Politisierung erzählt, spielt in Städten, die aussehen wie auf Malta oder in Bulgarien: viele europäisch anmutende Marktplätze, viele Betonbauten wie aus den 80er Jahren. Ort der Handlung ist ein ganzer Mond: Maidstone. Im Jahr 2843 versorgen dort Arbeiter die Nachbarmonde und -Planeten mit Industriegütern und Obst. Arthur McBride kämpft für die Unabhängigkeit, benennt sein Reich in “Avalon” um. Erst 40 Jahre später stürzt das Regime, und Maias Geschichte kommt ans Licht.

Seit 2015 erscheint “Invisible Republic” im US-Verlag Image Comics: bislang 15 Kapitel, gesammelt in drei Bänden. 15 weitere sollen folgen. Die Zeichnungen stammen von Gabriel Hardman, Mit-Autorin der Texte ist seine Ehefrau Corinna Bechko. Der klügste, differenzierteste, literarischste Plot über Ideale, Radikalisierung, Terror, Macht und Korruption, den ich seit Jahren las.

Aber warum unbedingt ein anderer Planet – statt diese Geschichte in Prag zu erzählen oder auf Kuba? In Irland oder der DDR? Ich glaube, um Retro-, Kitsch- und “Früher war alles anders”-Fallen zu entkommen! Science Fiction hat Raum für alle denkbaren Grautöne, Differenzierungen – ohne, dass sich Autorinnen und Autoren in falscher Nostalgie verlieren. Wer über Arbeitslager, Genozid, Militärdiktaturen nachdenkt, kann über Deutschland im zweiten Weltkrieg schreiben. Über Japan im Krieg gegen China. Oder über Cardassianer und Bajoraner in “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine”. Nicht als Verhamlosung, Verfremdung. Sondern, um Muster zu zeigen – statt im Partikulären, im Historisch-Spezifschen hängen zu bleiben. In Zeiten, von denen man zu schnell sagt: “Das ist vorbei, überwunden. Das ist bei uns nicht möglich.”

J.R.R. Tolkien wird für das “Worldbuilding” von Mittelerde bewundert. Doch viel kluge, politische, originelle Welten werden heute auch im Genre der “Hard Science Fiction” entworfen: Zukunftsromane über Machtstrukturen, Soziologie und die Grenzen von Bewusstsein, Körpern, Gesellschaft. Die Klassiker? Arthur C. Clarkes Mars-Trilogie, “Picknick am Wegesrand” der Strugatzki-Brüder, Isaac Asimovs Roboter-Gesetze. Im Fernsehen mühen sich “Battlestar Galactica” und “The Expanse” um möglichst viele Abgründe, Realpolitik. In Deutschland sticht Andreas Brandhorst hervor. Und, besonders: Dietmar Dath.

Bisher wollten fünf Romane des Freiburger Kritikers und Autors Zukunft möglichst originell und gesellschaftskritisch neu denken: das Genetik-Märchen “Abschaffung der Arten” (2008), der aktuelle “fünf Menschen reisen zu einer unbekannten Zivilisation auf der Sonne”-Roman “Der Schnitt durch die Sonne” (24. August 2017) und die Planeten-Romane “Pulsarnacht” (2012), “Feldeváye” (2014) und “Venus siegt” (2015).

Was geschieht, sobald man das Bewusstsein eines Menschen digitalisieren und in Maschinen speichern kann: Lassen sich Seelen kopieren? Können sie die Körper wechseln? Oder werden Menschen dann sofort von Maschinen überflügelt, bedroht?

Was passiert, wenn ein Generationen-Raumschiff nach Hunderten von Jahren einen Planeten erreicht und besiedelt – doch der Menschheit in der Zwischenzeit Reisen mit Überlichtgeschwindigkeit gelingen? Und das Schiff unterwegs überholt wird? In Daths “Feldeváye” werden die Zu-Spät-Gekommenen, “Lacs”, zur verhassten Unterschicht. In “Invisible Republic” bricht die Wirtschaft zusammen, als die Erde plötzlich durch schnelle Schiffe neuen Einfluss gewinnt.

Der einzige Dath-Planetenroman, den ich deutlich empfehlen kann, ist “Venus siegt”: ein Buch über einen Funktionärssohn, der mit den Machtcliquen seiner Heimatwelt, der Venus, hadert. Und mit dem sozial-ethischen Experiment, Menschen, Robotern und entkörperlichten künstlichen Intelligenzen gleiche Rechte zu geben. Wikipedia sagt: Eh alles nur eine Metapher auf Lenin, Trotski, Hitler. Und klar: Solche Parallelen entstehen schnell. Doch statt zu rufen “Verlagert das nicht ins All! Ihr kostümiert und verharmlost damit Menschheitsgeschichte!”, lohnt es sich, bei “Invisible Republic”, bei Marxist Dath, oder bei Cardassianern und Bajoranern noch einmal in die andere Richtung zu fragen: Was wird hier erzählt, gezeigt, schattiert, hinterfragt, das in einem Türkei- oder Nazi- oder US-Roman undenkbar wäre?

Worldbuilding heißt: neu anfangen. Dinge grundsätzlich denken, von sehr weit vorne, und dann sehr weit in alle Auswüchse hinein. In Westeros, in Gotham City, in Panem oder auf Minbar lässt sich oft schneller, grundsätzlicher neu fragen: Wie sähe eine gerechte Gesellschaft aus? Worunter leiden wir? Was tun wir dagegen? “Niemandsland”, sagt Dietmar Dath, “besiedelt man am schnellsten.”

George R.R. Martin’s favorite Books & Movies – Recommendations, in his own Words

got hbo 10

.

George R.R. Martin (“A Song of Ice and Fire”, adapted to “Game of Thrones”) loves to read science-fiction and fantasy. He watches quite a lot of TV shows. He runs his own cinema in Santa Fe…

He blogs at grrm.livejournal.com

here’s a list of ALL movies, TV shows, authors, book recommendations and mini-reviews from his blog, published between 2005 and June 2017 – with extensive quotes by Martin himself.

.

I’m a Berlin journalist, and I write mostly in German. Deutschlandfunk Kultur, an NPR-like station, invited me to talk about Martin’s writing progress.

.

While reading Martin’s blog, I also marked 100 quotes and passages that resonated with me, and collected them here (Link: 100 Things I learned about George R.R. Martin and ‘Game of Thrones’ from reading his entire Blog).

It’s pretty parasitic of me to just copy’n’paste these huge masses of his text. It took me three days to read, edit and sort out all of this, so it’s still an effort on my side – but I could understand if he’s annoyed or wants me to delete it. For now, I ask you to PLEASE visit his blog, and take my own list as a mere appetizer.

Martin recommends the annual LOCUS Recommended Reading List (Link to 2016)

For a while, until ca. 2013, Martin published mini-reviews on his web site:

.

DSC00609 (2)

.

Movies & TV shows:

.

Movies:

  • the best Sci-Fi movie? MGM, 1956. Leslie Nielson, Anne Francis, Walter Pidgeon, Robbie the Robot. FORBIDDEN PLANET.
  • THE IRON GIANT, a personal favorite
  • WAR OF THE WORLDS, the great 1953 George Pal version
  • WATCHMEN, which I loved
  • The Swedish film of THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO. Highly recommended  a very faithful adaptation of an excellent novel.
  • THE DESCENT, which I think may well be the best horror film of the past twenty years or so.
  • Try George Pal’s wonderful adaptation of H.G. Wells’ WAR OF THE WORLDS (a better film than the Spielberg remake, in my opinion)
  • Or Pal’s version of THE TIME MACHINE (a MUCH better film than the really truly abominable recent remake).
  • MY BIG NIGHT, a hilarious romp by the Spanish filmmaker Alex de la Iglesia.
  • THE MARTIAN: a great adaptation of a terrific book.
  • FREQUENCY (movie): one of the very best treatments of time paradoxes and the butterfly effect I’ve ever seen.
  • PREDESTINATION: an excellent little film, with a wonderful performance by Sarah Snook.
  • WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS is a comedy out of New Zealand, about four vampires living together in Wellington, NZ. It’s hilarious.
  • DARK STAR, a hilarious SF comedy, and the movie that gave Dan O’Bannon and John Carpenter their starts.
  • The new JUNGLE BOOK: I loved loved loved it.
  • GENIUS (2016): The movie got very little notice from the world at large, but I loved loved loved it.
  • FREE THE NIPPLE, the docudrama about the women who led the fight for nipple equality in New York City.
  • The movies based on Pat Conroy’s books were pretty damned good, even if the film version of THE PRINCE OF TIDES did omit… well… the prince of tides. THE GREAT SANTINI is the best of those.

.

other movies:

  • V FOR VENDETTA
  • AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH
  • DEAD POET’S SOCIETY
  • BLAZE YOU OUT
  • 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY
  • THE DAY THE EARTH STOOD STILL
  • CHARLIE (the film version of the classic “Flowers for Algernon”)

.

recommended TV episodes:

  • SOUTH PARK’s “Trapped in the Closet”
  • “San Junipero” from BLACK MIRROR, my favorite episode from that terrific show.
  • 1×04: the latest [terrific] episode of TRUE DETECTIVE.

.

TV shows:

  • THE SOPRANOS
  • DEADWOOD
  • ROME
  • MAD MEN
  • GRIMM
  • DEXTER
  • MASTERS OF SEX
  • THE KNICK
  • HALT AND CATCH FIRE
  • VIKINGS
  • JUSTIFIED
  • BIG BANG THEORY
  • ORPHAN BLACK: a terrific show
  • FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS: fine high school football drama
  • HOMELAND is an excellent series [2012]
  • AMERICAN HORROR STORY. A perennial Emmy contender, yet it never seems to get any notice at Hugo time.
  • FARGO and BETTER CALL SAUL both had excellent seasons, as usual, but ended way too soon. [2017]
  • BOARDWALK EMPIRE. Great show, I think. The second season was even better than the first. Love Steve Buschemi as Nucky especially.
  • THRILLER, the scariest show on television at the time (1960-1962).
  • Parris and I are going to miss THE GOOD WIFE, but we’ve been enjoying the hell out of BETTER CALL SAUL and COLONY, and the new season of PENNY DREADFUL has been fun so far as well.
  • The very grim WALKING DEAD, the very tongue-in-cheek Z NATION, plus I, ZOMBIE. The undead are well represented.
  • Horror fans had a lot to enjoy between THE WALKING DEAD, Z NATION, and PENNY DREADFUL.
  • The British anthology series BLACK MIRROR had some wonderfully original and mind-bending segments.
  • NYPD BLUE remains some of the finest ever seen on television. Best police show ever, imnsho.
  • THE NIGHT OF. Yes, it’s very dark, but damn, this is brilliant television, with a bravura performance by John Turturro at its heart that ought to win him a whole shelf full of awards, if there is any justice.
  • And for something truly from left field, the always witty crime romcom CASTLE has been known to wander into [science fiction] from time to time.
  • Why is Nick Offermann not on the [Emmy] ballot for PARKS AND RECREATION?
  • On the “guilty pleasures” front, I have been meaning to confess how much I enjoy DEADLIEST WARRIOR.

.

longer quotes about TV shows:

  • How many of you have been watching HBO’s big new drama WESTWORLD? If not, you don’t know what you’re missing. It’s intriguing. The old Yul Brynner / Michael Crichton movie was just the seed, this one goes way way way beyond that. It’s gorgeous to look at, and the writing and acting and directing are all first rate.
    .
  • OUTLANDER, the marvelous adaptation of Diana Gabaldon’s time travel novels that just finished its first season on STARZ… well, the show is terrific, but the books are even better. [2014]
  • OUTLANDER, with its music and its costumes and its cinematography and the incredible performances of its three leads (especially Tobias Menzies in his double role). [2015]
  • The show that’s really knocking our (argyle) socks off, however, is the second season of OUTLANDER. [2016]
    .
  • BREAKING BAD: Amazing series. Amazing episode last night [“Ozymandias”]. Talk about a gut punch. Walter White is a bigger monster than anyone in Westeros. (I need to do something about that).
  • Uzo Aduba from ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK, whose Crazy Eyes is the most unforgettable character on an amazing and addictive show.
  • THE EXPANSE: This is the show that fandom has been waiting for since FIREFLY and BATTLESTAR GALACTICA left the air… a real kickass spaceship show, done right.
  • JONATHAN STRANGE AND MR. NORRELL, the seven=part BBC television miniseries adaptation of the Hugo-winning novel by Susannah Clarke. A lovely piece of work, I thought, and — again — faithful to the source material (a big thing with me).
  • The other show we stumbled on was GOOD GIRLS REVOLT, which dramatizes the struggle of the women at NEWSWEEK… er, “NEWS OF THE WEEK”… fighting for the chance to be reporters instead of simply researchers in 1969. I thought it was excellent. The actresses in the leading roles were all terrific, and the male characters were pretty nuanced as well; the show portrayed the sexism of the times, and the indignities the women were forced to put up with, without falling into the trap of painting all the men as monsters and assholes. Good writing and good acting, and hey, I loved the music and the clothes as well (what can I say? I’m the guy who wrote THE ARMAGEDDON RAG). Aside from its feminist themes, which were front and center, GOOD GIRLS REVOLT also struck me as the best show about journalism since LOU GRANT. And Ilikeshows about journalism. Wish there were more of them. It’s a pity GOOD GIRLS REVOLT won’t be back. It was just getting started, and then it was over. Guess I’ll just need to read the book.

.

problematic TV shows:

  • THE TUDORS. Decidedly mixed feelings.
  • BATTLESTAR GALACTICA: the reboot is a hundred times better than the original. [but he “pretty much hated” the series finale]
  • [he dislikes] SPARTACUS: BLOOD AND SAND
  • I sure hope those guys doing LOST have something better up planned for us. Though if it turns out to be They Were All Dead All Along I’m really going to be pissed. [2009]
  • Let me banish all reality shows from the air!

.

Music & Stage:

  • One of my favorite singer/ songwriters, the one and only JANIS IAN
  • My favorite song is Kris Kristofferson’s “The Pilgrim, Chapter 33.”
  • There was a certain time in my life when I listened to Leonard Cohen’s SONGS OF LOVE AND HATE album obsessively.
  • THE WRECKING CREW (2015 documentary): great, just great. Now THAT’s my kind of music.
  • We caught WAR HORSE on stage. AMAZING show. More impressive than the film, I think. The puppetry is magical.

.

longer quotes about movies:

  • The original STAR WARS was a good movie, and EMPIRE STRIKES BACK was even better (Leigh Brackett wrote that one, so there’s good reason), but RETURN OF THE JEDI went downhill, and you really don’t want to get me started about those three wretched prequels.
  • Saw the new STAR TREK movie [2009] last night. No spoilers here, just a resounding thumbs down. Take a pass. Let’s have television versions of Honor Harrington and Miles Vorkosigan. Let’s have someone film the Praxis series by Walter Jon Williams, the best space opera I’ve read in years. Let’s have anything that isn’t Trek or STAR WARS.If they really must remake old shows, screw it, let them remake Tom Corbett, Space Cadet, or Rocky Jones, Space Ranger.
  • The first MAD MAX was just okay, I will admit, but BEYOND THUNDERDOME was damned good, and I rank the middle film, THE ROAD WARRIOR, as the best post-holocaust film, and one of the best SF adventures, ever made. Fury road: I’ve often said that the climatic chase sequence at the end of THE ROAD WARRIOR was the best car chase scene ever put on film (it’s what DAMNATION ALLEY should have been, as I once told Roger Zelazny — who agreed). Well, FURY ROAD is the ROAD WARRIOR chase sequence with the dial turned up… not just to 11, but to 47 or some such. Truth be told, I sometimes get bored during car chases. Not this one.
  • It’s Christmas Eve. Time for my ritual screening of my favorite adaptations of A CHRISTMAS CAROL… the Reginald Owen version, the Alastair Sim version, the George C. Scott version, and… best of all… BLACKADDER’S CHRISTMAS CAROL, with Rowan Atkinson.
  • A CHRISTMAS STORY: my second favorite Christmas movie of all time (I love it, but I have to confess, I love the Alastair Sim CHRISTMAS CAROL even more).
  • I am a huge fan of Quentin Tarantino (and not just because he owns a movie theatre too).
  • RAZE: it’s the feel-good movie of the season… (Well, no, not really, but it’s a powerful piece of film making, brutal as a club to the guts, and Zoe Bell is terrific in it.)
  • FOOTLIGHT PARADE: One of the last of the great pre-Code films, it’s amazing to see how risque it is compared to what Hollywood would be making a year later and for decades to follow.
  • ARRIVAL. Terrific adaptation of a classic story by Ted Chiang. Brilliant performance from Amy Adams. (She is always great, I think, but this was her best role to date). A real science fiction story, not a western in space. Intelligent, thought-provoking, with some wonderfully alien aliens.
  • THE GREAT GATSBY (Baz Luhrman): Count me with those who loved it. I think this is a great film. AND a great and faithful adaptation of the novel, which is not necessarily the same thing.
  • Richard Donner’s LADYHAWKE. Not only one of the greatest fantasy films ever made (ignore that bloody soundtrack please), but one of the great romances as well.
  • My favorite guilty pleasure movie is SUMMER LOVERS. I want to go to the island of Santorini and have a menage a trois with Darryl Hannah and Valerie Quinessen.
  • TRUMPLAND: Whatever you may think of Michael Moore or his politics, he’s never less than entertaining. He makes some great political points here, but even if you disagree with every one of those, there are a lot of laughs as well.
  • Actress Amy-Joyce Hastings never got to audition for GAME OF THRONES. That’s something she has in common with thousands of other actors from all over the world. Unlike all the others, however, Amy-Joyce took life’s lemons and made lemonade; she shared her experiences with her friend Graham Cantwell, an Irish filmmaker, who took her tale about a young actress attempting to land a role in an epic fantasy, and turned it into a movie… a romantic comedy about moviemakers and aspiring actors that pokes fun at the whole casting carousel… starring Amy-Joyce Hastings: THE CALLBACK QUEEN (2013).

.

He liked ALIEN. ALIENS was “even better”. But he never saw “Alien 3” or any other sequels:

I loved ALIEN and ALIENS, but when I read the early reviews of ALIENS 3, and learned that the new movie was going to open by killing Newt and… what was his name, the Michael Biehn character?… well, I was f*cking outraged. I never went to the film because I did not want that sh*t in my head. I had come to love Newt in the preceding movie, the whole damn film was about Ripley rescuing her, the end was deeply satisfying… and now some asshole was going to come along and piss all over that just to be shocking. I have never seen the subsequent Aliens films either, since they are all part of a fictional “reality” that I refuse to embrace.

.

Marvel movies & comic books:

  • I loved MS MARVEL. Yay! A very fun read, a great new character for the Marvel universe.(he didn’t like that THE AVENGERS (2012) had Black Widow and Hawkeye instead of The Wasp and Ant-Man Hank Pym.)
    .
  • ANT-MAN has a proper balance of story, character, humor, and action, I think. A couple reviewers are calling it the best Marvel movie ever. I won’t go that far, but it’s right up there, maybe second only to the second Sam Raimi/ Tobey McGuire Spider-Man film, the one with Doc Ock. I’ve liked most of the Marvel movies, to be sure, I’m still a Marvel fanboy at heart (Excelsior!), but I liked this one more than the first AVENGERS and a lot more than the second, more than either THOR, more than the second and third IRON MAN and maybe just a smidge more than the first (though I liked that one a lot too). [2015]
    .
  • Doctor Strange was probably my favorite single character… well, him or Spider-Man, both drawn by Steve Ditko, whose art I loved. (I say single character because I always loved the group books as well, the FF and Avengers and X-Men). How much did I love Doctor Strange? Well, let me just say, one of the characters I wrote for the comic book fanzines of the 60s was called Doctor Weird, so… […] The movie is NOT the best Marvel superhero movie, as I was hoping it would be… it’s more middle of the pack, I’d say… but it looked great, did justice to the character, and had some scenes that were downright Ditko-esque. [2016]
    .
  • My first published words were letters to Stan [Lee] and Jack [Kirby] in the pages of THE FANTASTIC FOUR and THE AVENGERS. My first published fictions were prose superhero stories in fanzines like HERO and YMIR and STAR-STUDDED COMICS. I was a member of the Merry Marvel Marching Society. I once won an Alley Award (though I never got it). Decades later, I was a guest of honor at San Diego Comicon and won an Inkpot. That was a long time ago, however. I fear I no longer follow mainstream comics much. I still love the stories and heroes I grew up, Silver Age Marvel and DC (hell, even Charlton, the Question and Blue Beetle were great), but there have been way too many retcons and reboots and restarts for my taste. I don’t know who these characters are any longer, and what’s worse, I don’t much care.

He’s not a fan of retcons and reboots in comic books, and was annoyed when he heard about the 2008 „Spider-Man“ storyline where Peter Parker’s marriage was razed from continuity:

  • I was puzzled recently when one of my readers emailed me to ask what I thought about what Marvel had done to Spider-Man. I didn’t know what Marvel had done to Spider-Man, but I was curious enough to Google, and pretty soon I found out. Bloody hell. I hate this, and judging from the discussions I am seeing on various blogs, I am not alone. Retconning sucks. Leave the goddamned continuity ALONE, for chrissakes. What happened, happened. Take an old character in a new direction, fine, cool, but don’t go back and mess around with the character’s past. It’s a breach of trust with your audience, as I see it. The DC universe has never really recovered from the Crisis on Infinite Earths, despite all the Crises that have followed, and I think the Marvel universe, and Spidey in particular, will be a long time recovering from this decision. So that’s my two cents. In a nutshell: boo, hiss, shame on you, Marvel. If I had a rotten tomato, I would throw it. [2008]

..

…and one graphic novel recommendation:

  • I haven’t read enough graphic novels to know for certain that Scott McCloud’s THE SCULPTOR was the best of 2015. But it is so damned good, so original and so human, that I cannot imagine that it is not one of the best five.

.

DSC02370

BOOKS:

.

Robert A. Heinlein:

  • If [the Hugo Awards] would have had a “Best Writer” award instead of “Best Novel”, Robert A. Heinlein would have won it every year from 1954 until his death.
    .
  • The first science fiction novel I ever read was Heinlein’s HAVE SPACE SUIT, WILL TRAVEL, a book that begins with a boy named Kip in a used spacesuit standing in his back yard, and goes on to take him (and us) to the moon, and Pluto, and the Lesser Magellanic Cloud, along the way encountering aliens both horrifying (the Wormfaces) and benevolent (the Mother Thing), as well as a girl named Peewee. In the end it’s up to Kip and Peewee to defend the entire human race when Earth is put on trial. I had never read anything like it, and from the moment I finished I wanted more; more Heinlein, more science fiction, more aliens and spacesuits and starships… more of the vast interstellar vistas that had opened before me.
    .
  • HAVE SPACE SUIT, WILL TRAVEL. It made me a SF reader for life. For decades thereafter, RAH was my favorite writer. Saw PREDESTINATION at the Cocteau on opening night, and thought it was terrific… and very faithful to the Heinlein story.
    .
  • The SF I love best is still the SF that gives me that sense of wonder I found in that Heinlein book almost sixty years ago, and afterwards in the works of Roger Zelazny, Jack Vance, Alfred Bester, Ursula K. Le Guin, Jack Vance, Andre Norton, the early Chip Delany, Jack Vance, Frank Herbert, Robert Silverberg, Jack Vance, Eric Frank Russell, Cordwainer Smith, Fritz Leiber, Jack Vance, Arthur C. Clarke, Poul Anderson, and so many more. (Did I mention Jack Vance?)
    .
  • Liking some of a writer’s work does not oblige you to like all of his work. I yield to no one in my admiration for Robert A. Heinlein, but my love for HAVE SPACE SUIT, WILL TRAVEL and THE PUPPET MASTERS and “All You Zombies” and “The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag” does not make me like I WILL FEAR NO EVIL or TIME ENOUGH FOR LOVE any better.
    .
  • I grew up reading [conservative author] Robert A. Heinlein, and still have been known to read works by [conservative-to-reactionary authors] Orson Scott Card, Dan Simmons, Larry Niven, and others whose political views are worlds away from my own. It’s GOOD to read things that challenge your own opinions and preconceptions… or so I have always believed…

.

Classic Sci-Fi and Fantasy:

  • My own top three [Hugo Winners?] would have been LORD OF LIGHT (Zelazny), THE STARS MY DESTINATION (Bester), and THE LEFT HAND OF DARKNESS (Le Guin).
    .
  • Luminaries as Theodore Sturgeon, Donald A. Wollheim, Fritz Leiber, Doc Smith, Robert Silverberg, Harlan Ellison.
    .
  • [The Hugo Awards hands out prizes to] the best that SF and fantasy have to offer. Heinlein won it four times. Zelazny, Le Guin, Simmons, Haldeman, Leiber, Pohl, Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Walter M. Miller.
    .
  • Books: LORD OF LIGHT and THE LEFT HAND OF DARKNESS and STAND ON ZANZIBAR and THE FOREVER WAR and GATEWAY and SPIN
    .
  • Jack Vance, our greatest living SF and fantasy writer. I reread the entire DEMON PRINCES series, and I’m doing the same with the four DYING EARTH books now. The Vance books were even better than I remembered them.
    .
  • Peter S. Beagle, whose work I have admired for a long long time (if you have never read THE LAST UNICORN or A FINE AND PRIVATE PLACE, don’t call yourself a fantasy fan).
    .
  • Terry Pratchett, the world’s funniest fantasist.
    .
  • I am a huge Lovecraft fan, and not much of a Burroughs fan at all.
    .
  • I would rank Gene Wolfe as one of the greatest SF and fantasy writers of the past half-century, right up there with Roger Zelazny and Ursula K. Le Guin.
    .
  • Now, I’m a major Stephen King fan, and have been for decades. King is tremendously prolific author, and when you write that many books, inevitably some of them are going to be better than others. That being said, 11/22/63 is the best King for at least a decade, a major piece of work.I was very pleased to see Stephen King take home the Best Novel award for MR. MERCEDES. You want to talk about writers who have been shamefully overlooked by the Hugos? (And by the Nebulas and the World Fantasy Award too). Start with King.
    .
  • Alan Garner was given a Lifetime Achievement award. I was very pleased to see that. Garner, the author of THE OWL SERVICE and THE WEIRDSTONE OF BRISINGAMEN and many other fine, fine fantasies, is long overdue for some recognition. If you’re not familiar with his books, you have a treat coming.
    .
  • George MacDonald Fraser will never be admitted to the august halls of High Literature, but if there was ever a more entertaining storyteller, I don’t know his name. GMF wrote some fine screenplays and some terrific stand-alone novels, but he will be best remembered for the Flashman books, his delightful series of historical swashbucklers.
    .
  • Arthur C. Clarke has died in Sri Lanka. Clarke was one of the the all time greats, and his books will be remembered for as long as people still read science fiction. These days he is best known to the general public for his role in 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY and for his RAMA series… but to my mind his masterpiece is CHILDHOOD’S END, one of the best SF novels ever written, and a true mind-blower when it was first published.
    .
  • Harry Harrison: . BILL THE GALACTIC HERO, THE TECHNICOLOR TIME MACHINE, DEATHWORLD (the first one is the best), THE STAINLESS STEEL RAT (ditto)…
    .
  • Kage Baker, who did a Cugel the Clever story that was a delight from start to finish. Don’t know Cugel? Shame on you. In her afterword Kage describes him as a cross between Wile E. Coyote and Harry Flashman, and that’s about right. I’d rank him as one of the great characters of modern fantasy, right up there with Conan the Barbarian, Elric of Melnibone, Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser, Jirel of Joiry, and those guys with the hairy feet from Tolkien.
    .
  • Algis Budrys was one of the greats. He did not write many novels, compared to some, but the quality of his work was second to none. MICHAELMAS and ROGUE MOON and WHO were his masterpieces.
    .
  • Howard Waldrop has few peers as a short fiction writer, and is long overdue for a Hugo.
    .
  • Richard Adams, the author of WATERSHIP DOWN. Gardner Dozois ranks WATERSHIP DOWN as one of the three great fantasy novels of the twentienth century, right up there with LORD OF THE RINGS and THE ONCE AND FUTURE KING, and I agree. A truly amazing book… and one that somehow always seems to get forgotten when fans discuss the great fantasies. Maybe because of the talking rabbits? No idea… He wrote two terrific epic fantasies with human characters, SHARDIK and MAIA, both of which are criminally underrated, as well as an erotic ghost story, THE GIRL ON A SWING. His other “animal book,” THE PLAGUE DOGS, also has some wonderful sections… though it is such a dark, depressing, angry, gut-punch of a novel that I can’t say I ‘enjoyed’ it.
    .
  • 1974, when Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle published THE MOTE IN GOD’S EYE and Samuel R. Delany published DHALGREN. Both major works by major writers, both bestsellers, both instantly recognized as classics… but in what may have been the last great battle of the Old Wave and New Wave, the fans who loved MOTE hated DHALGREN, and vice versa. (I loved them both myself.)
    .
  • You owe it to yourself to read J.R.R. Tolkien (LORD OF THE RINGS), Robert E. Howard (Conan the Cimmerian, Kull of Atlantis, Solomon Kane), C.L. Moore (Jirel of Joiry), Jack Vance (THE DYING EARTH, Lyonesse, Cugel the Clever, and so much more), Fritz Leiber (Fafhrd and the Grey Mouser), Richard Adams (WATERSHIP DOWN, SHARDIK, MAIA), Ursula K. Le Guin (Earthsea, the original trilogy), Mervyn Peake (GORMENGHAST), T.H. White (THE ONCE AND FUTURE KING), Rosemary Sutcliffe, Alan Garner, H.P. Lovecraft (more horror than fantasy, admittedly), Clark Ashton Smith, Daniel Abraham (THE LONG PRICE QUARTET, THE DAGGER AND THE COIN, Scott Lynch (the Locke Lamora series), Patrick Rothfuss, Joe Abercrombie (especially BEST SERVED COLD and THE HEROES).
    .
  • Sir Walter Scott is hard going for many modern readers, I realize, but there’s still great stuff to be found in IVANHOE and his other novels, as there is in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s WHITE COMPANY (he write more than just Sherlock Holmes). Thomas B. Costain (THE BLACK ROSE, THE SILVER CHALICE) is another writer worth checking out, along with Howard Pyle, Frank Yerby, Rosemary Hawley Jarman. Nigel Tranter lived well into his 90s, writing all the while, and turning out an astonishing number of novels about Scottish medieval history (his Bruce and Wallace novels are the best, maybe because they are the only ones where his heroes actually win, but I found the lesser known lords and kings equally fascinating). Thanks to George McDonald Fraser, that cad and bounder Harry Flashman swashed and buckled in every major and minor war of the Victorian era. Sharon Kay Penman, Steven Pressfield, Cecelia Holland, David Anthony Durham, David Ball, and the incomparable Bernard Cornwell are writing and publishing firstrate historical fiction right now, novels that I think any fan of A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE would find easy to enjoy.
    .
  • John Howe, Alan Lee, and Ted Nasmith? The “Big Three” of Tolkien illustrators are among the best known fantasy artists in the world today, and have been for many decades, and NONE OF THEM HAVE EVER BEEN NOMINATED FOR A HUGO. [2008]

.

Writers:

  • Diana Gabaldon, author of the mega-bestselling OUTLANDER series… and the occasional terrific short story and novella
  • Joe Lansdale is an incredible writer, with a unique voice. Compulsively readable.
  • Pat Cadigan (a terrific writer herself, queen of cyberpunk)
  • Carrie Vaughn: an amazing writer, an amazing person.
  • Gillian Flynn is an amazing writer.
  • Jim Sallis, a world-class mystery novelist who made his mark writing and teaching SF earlier in his career
  • We have an especially strong crop of new young fantasists coming up of late, including Joe Abercrombie, David Anthony Durham, and Scott Lynch. [2008]
  • Robert Jordan: His huge, ambitious WHEEL OF TIME series helped to redefine the genre, and opened many doors for the writers who followed.
    .
  • Pat Conroy has been one of my favorite novelists for a long, long time. THE PRINCE OF TIDES is probably his masterpiece, but I loved BEACH MUSIC and THE LORDS OF DISCIPLINE and THE GREAT SANTINI and THE WATER IS WIDE as well. Oh, and his non-fiction memoir, MY LOSING SEASON, another engrossing read.
    .
  • Dennis Lehane is the author of GONE BABY GONE, MYSTIC RIVER, and SHUTTER ISLAND, all of which have been made into terrific movies… but the novels are even better. He’s also written some other novels that haven’t been made into movies (yet), and those are just as good. My favorite is THE GIVEN DAY, a historical about the Boston Police Strike.
    .
  • China Mieville (who is a vocal and passionate leftist, yes, but also a helluva powerful writer)
    .
  • John Nichols, author of the MILAGRO BEANFIELD WAR and many other great titles. A fascinating guy, whose work truly captures the sights, sounds, and spirit of Northern New Mexico.
    .
  • Ted Chiang… a writer of literary SF, we may agree, but one of the most powerful to enter our field in many years. There’s a reason Chiang wins every time he is nominated for a award. He’s bloody good.
    .
  • [Martin is friends with and admires the work of:] Connie Willis, David Gerrold, Daniel Abraham, Lisa Tuttle, My friend Vic Milan was smarter. His new novel, THE DINOSAUR LORDS, will be out next June. First of a trilogy. It’s got dinosaurs, and it’s got knights. What more can you ask? (And why the hell didn’t I think of it first??)
    .
  • It was particularly gratifying to see [Hugo Award] rockets go to [illustrator, artist] Donato Giancola and [sci-fi publsisher] David Hartwell.

.

recommended novels:

  • SPIN by Robert Charles Wilson, a really terrific novel
  • Michael Chabon’s THE YIDDISH POLICEMAN’S UNION. A great book.
  • THE MARTIAN by Andy Weir: a great adaptation of a terrific book.
  • John Scalzi: REDSHIRTS is a light, fun, amusing SF adventure, an affectionate riff off of STAR TREK
  • Katherine Addison’s THE GOBLIN EMPEROR. I liked it.
  • “The Girl-Thing Who Went Out for Sushi,” by Pat Cadigan. A brilliant story
  • Lauren Beukes: the brilliant SHINING GIRLS
  • I also read and enjoyed the new Naomi Novik, UPROOTED
  • Joe Hill’s THE FIREMAN: original and gripping, a page-turner…
  • Latest fun read: the new Melinda Snodgrass novel THE HIGH GROUND, first volume of her space opera series. Space cadets! This is her best work yet, I think.
  • The best epic fantasy I read last year has to be THE WISE MAN’S FEAR, by Patrick Rothfuss.
  • HEAVEN’S SHADOW, another solid and engrossing hard SF novel from David S. Goyer and Michael Cassutt.
    .
  • Ernie Cline: ARMADA, like READY PLAYER ONE, is a paean to the videogames of a bygone era, and like READY PLAYER ONE it is a tremendous amount of fun for anyone who remembers that time and played those games. (Those who did not may find it incomprehensible, admittedly).
    .
  • I read the mega-bestseller THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN, by Paula Hawkins, a mystery/ thriller/ novel of character about three women who live near the train tracks of a London commuter lines, and how their lives and loves get entwined when one of them disappears under mysterious circumstances. Fans of Gillian Flynn’s books will probably like this one too. I know I did… though I don’t think Hawkins is quite as deft a writer as Flynn. The first person voices of the three narrators sounded too much alike, I thought, but that’s a minor quibble. The main narrator, an alcoholic who is slowly falling apart, is especially well drawn. It’s a strong story, with a great sense of time and place, and one that had me from start to finish.

.

DSC00683 (2)

.

Historical Fiction:

  • And then there is Maurice Druon. Which is actually why I called you all here today, boys and girls. Look, if you love A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE, and want “something like it” to read while you are waiting (and waiting, and waiting) for me to finish THE WINDS OF WINTER, you really need to check out Maurice Druon and THE ACCURSED KINGS.
    .
  • Maurice Druon: I am a huge fan of his best known novels, the wonderful “Accursed Kings” series of historical novels.
    .
  • I am a big fan of historical fiction, especially medieval historical fiction. Nigel Tranter, Maurice Druon, Thomas B. Costain, Sharon Kay Penman, Cecelia Holland… and especiall Bernard Cornwell, who writes the best battles of any writer who has ever lived.
    .
  • I read some of the latest Bernard Cornwell (excellent, as always). There’s no one who writes better action scenes, in any genre.
    .
  • David Anthony Durham’s new historical novel, THE RISEN, his take on Spartacus. DAD never disappoints, and Spartacus is another fascination of mine… I look forward to seeing how Durham’s take on him differs from Howard Fast’s and Colleen McCullough’s.
    .
  • Lisa Tuttle’s THE SOMNAMUBIST AND THE PYSCHIC THIEF, featuring Miss Lane and Jasper Jesperson, the Victorian-era detectives she first introduced in her stories for DOWN THESE STRANGE STREETS and ROGUES. Those were hugely entertaining stories, and I am eager to see what Lisa does with the characters at novel length. Fans of Sherlock Holmes should love this.

.

Fantasy: Quick Recommendations

  • I read more fantasy than SF last year. Understandably, as the publishers send me just about every epic fantasy they are putting out for blurbs. This is a golden age for fantasy, and there’s some great work being done. 2012 was no exception. I enjoyed Saladin Ahmed’s THRONE OF THE CRESCENT MOON, an old-fashioned sword-and-sorcery adventure with an Arabian Knights flavor, rather than the usual “medieval Europe” setting. There was a new Joe Abercrombie as well, and though I didn’t feel RED COUNTRY quite measured up to last year’s THE HEROES, Abercrombie is always worth reading. No new Rothfuss last year, though, and nothing by Scott Lynch… or that Martin guy, for that matter.
    .
  • 2011: Well, damn, it was a great year for fantasy. I read at least half a dozen books so good that they made me say, “I wish I’d written that.” THE HEROES by Joe Abercrombie was an action tour de force, an entire novel built around a single battle. Lev Grossman’s THE MAGICIAN KING was a worthy successor to THE MAGICIANS, and proof that last year’s Hugo voters knew what they were about when they voted Grossman the Campbell Award as the best new writer in the field.

.

longer Sci-Fi reviews:

  • THE THREE-BODY PROBLEM, by Cixin Li s a very unusual book, a unique blend of scientific and philosophical speculation, politics and history, conspiracy theory and cosmology, where kings and emperors from both western and Chinese history mingle in a dreamlike game world, while cops and physicists deal with global conspiracies, murders, and alien invasions in the real world. It’s a worthy nominee. If you like lots of science in your SF, this is a book for you, especially if you love theoretical physics, astrophysics, and mathemathics. The Chinese background is fascinating, especially the look at the Cultural Revolution and its aftereffects. And the prose is very clean and tight, which is not always the case with translations, which sometimes come across as a bit clunky. Ken Liu did a fine job, in that respect; the writing flows.
    .
  • LAURA J. MIXON is a professional writer, and a very talented one, with half a dozen strong novels under her own name and her pseudonym of M.J. Locke… but this year she published on-line, in a non-professional and unpaid capacity, ‘A Report on Damage Done by One Individual Under Several Names,’ a detailed, eloquent, and devastating expose of the venomous internet troll best known as ‘Requires Hate’ and ‘Winterfox.
    .
  • I also read LINES OF DEPARTURE by Marko Kloos. It’s military SF, solidly in the tradition of STARSHIP TROOPERS and THE FOREVER WAR. No, it’s not nearly as good as either of those, but it still hands head and shoulders above most of what passes for military SF today. The enigmatic (and gigantic) alien enemies here are intriguing, but aside from them there’s not a lot of originality here; the similarity to THE FOREVER WAR and its three act structure is striking, but the battle scenes are vivid, and the center section, where the hero returns to Earth and visits his mother, is moving and effective. ANGLES OF ATTACK is, I think, better.
  • My list of “great military SF novels” includes STARSHIP TROOPERS, BILL THE GALACTIC HERO, THE FOREVER WAR, and an oldie called WE ALL DIED AT BREAKAWAY STATION, but not much else.

.

Nonfiction:

  • THE WHEEL OF TIME COMPANION was a mammoth concordance of facts about the universe and characters of the late Robert Jordan’s epic fantasy series, edited and assembled by Harriet McDougal, Alan Romanczuk, and Maria Simons. It’s a labor of love, and everything one could possibly want to know about Jordan’s universe is in there. Robert Jordan was a giant in the history of modern fantas
  • Felicia Day’s delightful look at her life, YOU’RE NEVER WEIRD ON THE INTERNET (Almost).
  • Kameron Hurley’s THE GEEK FEMINIST REVOLUTION, a collection of her essays, thoughts, and personal reflections.
  • A book of interviews — TRAVELER OF WORLDS: CONVERSATIONS WITH ROBERT SILVERBERG, by Alvaro Zinos-Amaro.
    .
  • I’ve also really enjoyed a non-fiction title from a couple of years ago called THE BEAUTIFUL CIGAR GIRL, by Daniel Stashower, which is simultaneously a bio of Edgar Allan Poe and a “true crime” account of a sensational NYC murder case that inspired him to write “The Mystery of Marie Roget.” Call this one history or biography if you must, but it reads like a novel… and I especially loved the stuff about the New York City press, one of my obsessions.
    .
  • DEAD WAKE: THE LAST CROSSING OF LUSITANIA. Eric Larson is a journalist who writes non-fiction books that read like novels, real page-turners. This one is no exception. I had known a lot about theTitanicbut little about theLusitania. This filled in those gaps. Larson’s masterpiece remains THE DEVIL IN THE WHITE CITY, but this one is pretty damned good too. Thoroughly engrossing.

.

DSCF0538

.

James S.A. Corey: The Expanse (novel series & TV show)

Martin’s former assistant Ty Franck is one of the two novelists of THE EXPANSE, a series of sci-fi novels that recently got a TV adaptation.

  • 2011, on book one, “Leviathan Rises” and the Hugos: This is the one that kicked my ass the hardest. It’s a terrific read, a page turner. If you love SF the way they used to write it, you will love this book.
    .
  • In 2012, the second volume of the Expanse series, CALIBAN’S WAR, was published. And far from being a victim of sophomore slump, that bastard Jimmy Corey seems to have done it again. CALIBAN’S WAR is even better than LEVIATHAN WAKES. It’s old-fashioned space opera, the kind of SF that I cut my teeth on, a real page-turner set in a vividly imagined solar system, squarely in the tradition of Heinlein and Asimov and Rocky Jones, Space Ranger (lacking only Pinto Vortando), superlatively written. Books like this were what made me an SF fan to begin with. CALIBAN’S WAR was the best pure SF I read in 2012, and I will be nominating it for the Hugo.
    .
  • One of the joys of the Expanse series is the way Jimmy Corey dances between subgenres. The series is certainly science fiction, no doubt of that, but assigning it to any particular sub-genre is more more difficult. Some parts read like space opera, some parts strike me as hard SF. The first book, LEVIATHAN WAKES, had some pretty strong horror elements with its vomit zombies, and also a real noir-ish mystery feel in the Miller chapters. With BABYLON’S ASHES, however, the war comes center stage, and we are definitely in the realm of Military SF.
    .
  • THE EXPANSE [TV show]: This is the show that fandom has been waiting for since FIREFLY and BATTLESTAR GALACTICA left the air… a real kickass spaceship show, done right.

.

Martin also likes Ty Franck’s Co-Writer, Daniel Abraham:

  • I just finished THE KING’S BLOOD, the second volume of Daniel Abraham’s “Dagger and Coin” series. Books like this remind me why I love epic fantasy. Yes, I’m prejudiced, Daniel is a friend and sometime collaborator… but damn, that was a good book. Great world, great characters, thoroughly engrossing story. The only problem was, it ended too soon. I want more. I want to know what happens to Cithrin, and Marcus, and Geder, and Clara. And I want to know NOW. God damn you, Daniel Abraham. I know for a fact that you are writing more Expanse books with Ty, and more urban fantasies as M.L.N. Hanover, and doing short stories for some hack anthologist, and scripting some goddamn COMIC BOOK, and even sleeping with your wife and playing with your daughter. STOP ALL THAT AT ONCE, and get to writing on the next Dagger and Coin. I refuse to wait.
    .
  • And Daniel Abraham… yes, him again, damn him… did something I would not have thought possible. He published a novel called THE DRAGON’S PATH, the first volume in the new epic fantasy series called THE DAGGER AND THE COIN, and it was just as bloody good as his Long Price Quartet.

.

Emily St. John Mandel: STATION ELEVEN

  • I’ve never met Emily St. John Mandel, and I’ve never read anything else by her, but I won’t soon forget STATION ELEVEN. One could, I suppose, call it a post-apocolypse novel, and it is that, but all the usual tropes of that subgenre are missing here, and half the book is devoted to flashbacks to before the coming of the virus that wipes out the world, so it’s also a novel of character, and there’s this thread about a comic book and Doctor Eleven and a giant space station and… oh, well, this book should NOT have worked, but it does. It’s a deeply melancholy novel, but beautifully written, and wonderfully elegiac… a book that I will long remember, and return to.
    .
  • [then, he invited her to a reading & author talk in Santa Fe] I had not read any of her three earlier novels. She was such a charming and fascinating guest, however, that I made up for that lack afterward, and now I am even more impressed with her talent than I was before. LAST NIGHT IN MONTREAL, THE SINGER’S GUN, and THE LOLA QUARTET are not science fiction or fantasy — don’t know how to characterize them, “literary noir” is about the best I can do — but damned, they are good. Fascinating characters, original stories, and such gorgeous prose. Rich, evocative, beautiful writing, but never intrusive. She makes her people and her places come alive in a way that draws you in and will not let you go.
    .
  • Sadly, no, STATION ELEVEN did not get a Hugo nomination. The reports of my vast power and influence within the field seem to be greatly exaggerated. So far as I can tell, my effect on the Hugo nominations is exactly nil. But I’ll keep recommending good stuff anyway. I’m stubborn.

.

Nnedi Okorafor:

  • [Martin is executive producing a new TV show for HBO] Yes, HBO is developing Nnedi Okorafor’s novel WHO FEARS DEATH as a series. Yes, I am attached to the project, as an Executive Producer. I am pleased and excited to confirm that much. I met Nnedi a few years ago, and I’m a great admirer of her work. She’s an exciting new talent in our field, with a unique voice.

.

.

got hbo 7

100 Things I learned about George R.R. Martin and „Game of Thrones“… from reading his entire Blog

.

I’ve read George R.R. Martin’s entire blog / livejournal: grrrm.livejournal.com

About 1000 entries, written from 2005 to June 2017.

I learned tons of things about his writing process, his politics, his passions, grievances… and his tone, style, personality.

Here’s a huge list I’ve made: all TV, movie and book recommendations from his blog

.

I’m a Berlin journalist, and I write mostly in German. Deutschlandfunk Kultur, an NPR-like station, invited me to talk about Martin’s writing progress.

.

While reading the blog, I marked quotes and passages that resonated with me. I want to collect them here:

It’s pretty parasitic of me to just copy’n’paste these huge masses of his text. It took me three days to read, edit and sort out all of this, so it’s still an effort on my side – but I could understand if he’s annoyed or wants me to delete it. For now, I ask you to PLEASE visit his blog, and take my own list as a mere appetizer.

If you know little about Martin, read the Wikipedia page and the biographical section of his web site (Link).

.

The very basics? George Raymond Richard Martin

.

  • …was born in 1948 and lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico
  • …loves sci-fi as much as fantasy
  • …has been publishing sci-fi, horror and fantasy since 1971.
  • …has studied and taught journalism.
  • …was a TV writer in the 80s, for “Twilight Zone”, “Max Headroom” and “The Beauty and the Beast”
  • …has been writing scripts for “Game of Thrones”, too – and is pretty involved in the production.

.

  • “A Song of Ice and Fire” was supposed to be a trilogy.
  • The first book was published in 1996. In 2009, HBO filmed a pilot movie for a series.
  • 7 books are planned. 5 of them are published already. The “Game of Thrones” show overtook the books in Season 6.
  • “Game of Thrones” will end in 2018, after season 8. Currently, scripts for five different TV prequel shows are being written.

.

.

99_His blog is called „Not A Blog“:

I’m calling this “Not A Blog.” I mean, I don’t have time to do a weblog. I don’t have the energy to do a weblog. There’s just no way I could do a weblog.

98_His home is bursting with books:

My unread shelf alone filled twenty-two boxes. (And those are just MY unread books, Parris has her own).

97_He studied and taught journalism – and he’s annoyed about misleading articles:

Clickbait journalism is to journalism as military music is to music.

96_He watches Marvel movies – but he doesn’t read many comic books:

My first published words were letters to Stan [Lee] and Jack [Kirby] in the pages of THE FANTASTIC FOUR and THE AVENGERS. My first published fictions were prose superhero stories in fanzines like HERO and YMIR and STAR-STUDDED COMICS. I was a member of the Merry Marvel Marching Society. I once won an Alley Award (though I never got it). Decades later, I was a guest of honor at San Diego Comicon and won an Inkpot. That was a long time ago, however. I fear I no longer follow mainstream comics much. I still love the stories and heroes I grew up, Silver Age Marvel and DC (hell, even Charlton, the Question and Blue Beetle were great), but there have been way too many retcons and reboots and restarts for my taste. I don’t know who these characters are any longer, and what’s worse, I don’t much care.

95_His writing doesn’t come easy:

Some writers enjoy writing, I am told. Not me. I enjoy having written.

94_Christmas is stressful to him:

My least favorite holiday of the year, and it is already bearing down on us like a freight train. Sorry, I have no Xmas spirit. Bah, humbug. Every year, for decades now, Christmas finds me stressed out like nobody’s business, trying to complete some script, story, or novel that I have promised to someone “by the end of the year”.

93_Often, his projects pile up:

The time is going by so fast. I grow ever more pessimistic, but I can’t think about dates and deadlines now. My mantra remains the same. One chapter at a time, one page at a time, one sentence at a time. [2008]

92_He loves tiny knight figurines:

You know about my passion for collecting 54mm toy knights and medieval miniatures. I attended the Old Toy Soldier Show in Schaumburg (the world’s best toy soldier show, and always great fun, when I can find the time to attend it.)

91_He’s known Parris, his second wife, since the 1970s. They became a couple when…

When I finally got together with Parris again, it was the 80s, I was divorced, and she was living in Portland, Oregon and waiting tables at a lesbian feminist restaurant called Old Wives’ Tales, where she was always getting in trouble for playing politically incorrect music. [more here: georgerrmartin.com/life/parris.html]

90_He often reads new chapters at conventions, or publishes them online:

When A FEAST FOR CROWS came out, I realized that something close to half the book had already been out there in one form or another — website samples, readings, promotional giveaways, excerpts in magazines, and so on. That was too much.

.

.

89_He writes chapters out of order:

I don’t always write these chapters in the order you read them. The epilogue will close the book, but it won’t be the last chapter written. For instance, the last chapter written on A STORM OF SWORDS was the Red Wedding).

88_Sometimes, chapters take years to turn out right:

Well, I finished a chapter of the DANCE this morning. Which ordinarily would not be occasion for comment, but this was a Bran chapter that I’ve been struggling with for something like six years. Bran has always been the toughest character to write, for a whole bunch of reasons

87_He sees no shame in revising, editing, reworking his books over and over again:

Some day, maybe, some student of fantasy literature may want to peruse all of these partial manuscripts, and document how A DANCE WITH DRAGONS changed over the years. Every time I printed out a copy to send to my editors, I made a second and sent it to the Special Collections at Texas A&M University, where my papers are kept. Maybe someone will get a master’s thesis out of my struggles with this book. [2011]

86_Here’s what happens once a manuscript is „done“:

Since finally completing A DANCE WITH DRAGONS some weeks ago, and announcing it here, I have been working on… drum roll, please… A DANCE WITH DRAGONS! That’s the way it goes with books. You finish, and breathe a sigh of relief… and then you get back to work. There’s always more to be done. Your editor reads it and gives you notes. You make revisions, corrections. A copyeditor goes over the text, finds errors, points out contradictions and inconsistencies, raises queries. You fix some, stet others. Friends and fans gulp down the book, and find mistakes your editors, copyeditors, and proofreaders all missed. You fix those too, as time allows. [2011]

85_He oversees a lot of merchandising and does a lot of consulting for GoT books, video games, figurines, swords etc.:

Mark Twain never sold Huckleberry Finn action figures, and F. Scott Fitzgerald never licensed the rights to make THE GREAT GATSBY into a board game. I remembered the words of my old boss, Ron Koslow, who created the tv show BEAUTY AND THE BEAST and always kept a tight rein on what subsidiary rights he would allow to be sold. He wanted Vincent to be a mythic figure, he always liked to say, and never wanted to see him on a lunchbox. I can understand that point of view. […] On the other hand, long before I was “the American Tolkien,” I was a comic book fanboy… one of the ORIGINAL comic book fanboys, thank you very much, the ones who started comics fandom. And the comic book fanboy thinks that games and cards and miniatures and all that stuff is hot shit.

84_He hates tax season and blogs about it nearly every year:

As a good liberal, I don’t actually object to paying taxes (although I would rather they spent more of my money on schools and health care and the space program, and less on bombs and tanks and Halliburton)… but I hate having to deal with all the record keeping.

83_During his childhood in New Jersey, he was rather poor:

I love old cars (our family never had enough money to own a car when I was a kid, so I walked and rode the bus and assembled plastic models of cars when other kids were building fighter planes).

82_The 1996 book tour for the novel in his „A Song of Ice and Fire“ series, „A Game of Thrones“, didn’t go great:

Reviews were generally good, sales were… well, okay. Solid. But nothing spectacular. No bestseller lists, certainly. I went on a book tour around that same time, signing copies in Houston, Austin, and Denton, Texas; in St. Louis, Missouri; in Chicago and Minneapolis; and up the west coast to San Diego, Los Angeles, Berkeley, Portland, and Seattle. Turnouts were modest in most places. The crowds didn’t reach one hundred anywhere, and at one stop (St. Louis, if you must know), not only was attendance zero but I actually drove four patrons out of the bookshop

81_His 2011 book tour went better:

My book tour, by the way, was astonishing. More than a thousand people at every appearance. Close to two thousand in New York. And such great people too… unfailingly cheerful and friendly and enthusiastic, despite having had to wait in line, in some cases for many hours. I have the best fans in the world.

80_He’s been writing and selling stories since 1971:

My career did not begin with A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE. Truth be told, I had been a professional writer for twenty years before I typed the first lines of the as-yet-untitled story that would grow to become A GAME OF THRONES. I had published four novels and half-a-dozen collections, won the Hugo and the Nebula and the World Fantasy Award, written science fiction, horror, and high fantasy. Most of it in the form of short stories.

.

.

79_He’s annoyed by Republican voter ID laws:

When I was a kid, we always felt free and superior watching World War II movies, where those evil Nazis were forever stopping the heroes and demanding to see “their papers.” That would never happen to US, we knew. We were Americans. We did not have to carry “papers.” Yet now there’s talk of a national ID card, and the driver’s license has become almost that by default.

78_He hated George W. Bush’s presidency. In early 2008, he wrote:

Obama and Edwards both interest me. I am lukewarm about Hillary. I wish she had come out stronger against the war. The best thing about this election, no matter who wins, is that come 2009, we will finally be rid of the worst president in all of American history, that malignant moron George W. Bush.

77_When Donald Trump won the 2016 election, he posted:

President Pussygrabber. There are really no words for how I feel this morning. America has spoken. I really thought we were better than this. Guess not. Trump was the least qualified candidate ever nominated by a major party for the presidency. Come January, he will become the worst president in American history, and a dangerously unstable player on the world stage.

76_In 2015, he hoped that Santa Fe – where he lives and writes – could take in Syrian refugees:

Donald Trump and thirty-one governors have it wrong, wrong, wrong. The Syrian refugees are as much victims of ISIS as the dead in France. Let them in. Santa Fe, at least, will welcome them.

75_In 2016, he pointed out that immigrants made America great:

The vast majority of you reading this are descended from immigrants (aside from those few who are Native American). I know I am. My paternal grandfather came over from Italy as a child. My maternal grandfather was Irish-American, a Brady whose own ancestors hailed from Oldcastle in County Meath. My paternal grandmother was half German and half Welsh. My maternal grandmother had French and English ancestry. I am a mongrel to the bone. In short, American. Wherever they came from, and whenever they made the crossing, all of my immigrant ancestors faced hardships, poverty, and discrimination when they came here. They came looking for freedom, they came looking for a better life. And they found it, or made it… and in the process they stopped being Irish or Italian or German and became Americans. The process is still going on today. Men and women dreaming of a better life still look to America, and cross oceans and deserts by whatever means they can to find that better life. They face hardships and discrimination as well. Not everyone welcomes them. Some talk of walls, of keeping people out, of sending them back. My ancestors faced the same sort of talk. So did yours. It’s an old old story, as old as our republic. Millard Fillmore is dead and forgotten, but the Know Nothing Party is alive and well today, under other names. They still know nothing. But some of us remember where we came from. Some of us remember that it was the immigrants, those tired poor huddled masses, who made America great to begin with.

74_He hates flying, because of invasive security checks:

I have always hated airline “security.” Step by step, year by year, the TSA and its predecessors have taken away more and more of our freedoms, subjecting millions of perfectly innocent travellers to searches and interrogations and other hassles in the vague hopes of catching hijackers (in the old days) and terrorists (these days). Even if it worked, the price would be too high, but of course it does not work. It has never worked. All of the 9/11 killers strolled through airport “security” without a problem, yet little old ladies in wheelchairs are pulled from line and patted down.

73_He loves road trips… and roadside attractions:

As much as I hate flying… or rather, what flying has become, thanks to the airlines and the TSA… I love long drives. Seeing the country as you pass through it, rather than just flying over it. Road trips are especially great if you can get off the Interstates. Stopping to eat at little mom & pop eateries, taking in the small towns, visiting the roadside attractions (the weirder, the better).

72_By 2012, he had three assistants, and affectionately called them ‘minions’:

It’s always nice to be back in Santa Fe, with Parris, the cats, and the minions. And to escape the LA heat as well. But the amount of crap that has piled up in my absence is daunting. There’s just too damn much. Even with three assistants, I am falling further and further behind, and more and more stuff keeps getting dumped on my plate. Somehow just walking back into my office after a trip sends my stress level ratcheting up to ten. [2012]

71_If he doesn’t post updates, his writing is going well:

I was away from my computer three days, and 450 emails accumulated in my absence. Sigh. When my webpage isn’t getting update, that’s usually a sign that I’m lost in my writing, with no energy left at the end of the day for much else. So that’s good. [2008]

70_He doesn’t blog that much about his writing:

Sorry, but I’m never going to be one of these writers who blogs daily about how many words they produced today. I don’t like to talk about the good days for fear of jinxing myself (all writers are superstitious at heart, just like baseball players), and I don’t like to talk about the bad days… well, just because. Writing is like sausage making in my view; you’ll all be happier in the end if you just eat the final product without knowing what’s gone into it.

.

.

69_He’s not looking for storytelling advice from fans and readers:

I really do not like talking about questions I am still wrestling with on a work in progress. It never helps. Art is not a democracy, and these are problems I need to solve myself. Having a few hundred readers weigh in with their thoughts and opinions — which seems to be what happens whenever I post here about DWD — does not advance the process. I’m sorry, but that’s true. I know that many of you would like to help me, but you can’t. I have editors and I have two capable assistants, and that’s sufficient. I’m the only one who can dance this dance.

68_When „A DANCE WITH DRAGONS“ was delayed in 2009, he blogged:

Since the very beginning of this series, I have been guilty of being over-optimistic about how long it would take me to finish the next book, the next chapter, or the series as a whole. I cannot deny that. I have always been bad with deadlines… one reason why I did my best to avoid them for the first fifteen years of my career. That’s an option I no longer have, however. Or at least will not have until A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE is complete. That’s the main reason why I no longer want to give any completion dates. I am sick and tired of people jumping down my throat when I miss them.

67_Everyone has an opinion on how he should spend his time:

I have to admit, the rising tide of venom about the lateness of A DANCE WITH DRAGONS has gotten pretty discouraging. Emails, message boards, blogs, LJ comments, everywhere I look (and lots of places where I don’t), people seem to be attacking me, defending me, using me as a bad example of something or other, whatever. Some of you hate my other projects. You don’t want me co-editing WARRIORS or the Vance anthology or STAR-CROSSED LOVERS or any of the other projects I’m doing with my old friend Gardner Dozois, and you get angry when I post about them here. For reasons I don’t quite comprehend, the people who hate those projects seem to hate WILD CARDS even more. You really don’t want me working on that, “wasting time” on that, and posting about it here. Some of you don’t want me attending conventions, teaching workshops, touring and doing promo, or visiting places like Spain and Portugal (last year) or Finland (this year). More wasting time, when I should be home working on A DANCE WITH DRAGONS. After all, as some of you like to point out in your emails, I am sixty years old and fat, and you don’t want me to “pull a Robert Jordan” on you and deny you your book. [2009]

66_Don’t give him unsolicited advice:

These are the kinds of things I grapple with. No comments necessary, really. I am not looking for advice, and in fact I seldom talk about such issues precisely to AVOID unsolicited advice. These sorts of things are best resolved by me and my muse, sometimes assisted by my editors. Just felt like rambling a little. [2010]

65_Some „new“ chapters that he posts online have been polishedand revised for years:

The new chapter is actually an old chapter. But no, it’s not one I’ve published or posted before, and I don’t even think I’ve read it at a con (could be wrong there, I’ve done readings at so many cons, it all tends to blur together). So it’s new in that it is material that no one but my editors (well, and Parris, and David and Dan, and a few others) have ever seen before, but it’s old in that it was written a long time ago, predating any of the samples that you have seen. The first draft was, at any rate. I’ve rewritten it a dozen times since then. Anyway, I’ve blathered on about it long enough, I will let the text speak for itself. Chapter title is “Mercy.” [2014]

64_He DOES enjoy posting „Things are finally done!“

This is for those who complain I never blog about my work. (I do, but not often. I prefer to announce when something is finally done, rather just endless reiterations of “I am working on X, I am working on Z,” and I am never going to be one of those “I wrote three pages today” writers. Sorry, that’s not how I roll). [2012]

63_Early on, he wrote stories for fanzines – but he does not like fan fiction:

Don’t write in my universe, or Tolkien’s, or the Marvel universe, or the Star Trek universe, or any other borrowed background. Every writer needs to learn to create his own characters, worlds, and settings. Using someone else’s world is the lazy way out. If you don’t exercise those “literary muscles,” you’ll never develop them.

62_He has written stories about another writer’s pre-existing characters. But he asked for permission first:

It it does bother me that people hear I wrote fan fiction, and take that to mean I wrote stories about characters taken from the work of other writers without their consent. Consent, for me, is the heart of this issue. If a writer wants to allow or even encourage others to use their worlds and characters, that’s fine. Their call. If a writer would prefer not to allow that… well, I think their wishes should be respected.

61_He liked fantasy writer Terry Pratchett – but didn’t know him well:

Terry was one of our greatest fantasists, and beyond a doubt the funniest. He was as witty as he was prolific I cannot claim to have known Terry well, but I ran into him at dozens of conventions over the decades, shared a stage with him a few times, and once or twice had the privilege of sharing a pint or a curry. He was always a delight. A bright, funny, insightful, warm, and kindly man, a man of infinite patience, a man who truly knew how to enjoy life… and books. [2015]

60_In 2014, he was annoyed that the Emmy Awards don’t much care for fantasy and sci-fi:

This was the 66th annual Emmy Awards. 66 years, and no science fiction or fantasy series has ever been honored. Many have been nominated, yes. None have ever won. [„Game of Thrones“ was awarded „Best Drama“ in 2015 and 2016.]

.

.

59_He loves WorldCon, the science-fiction convention where the Hugo Awards are awarded. He’s overwhelmed by San Diego Comic Con, though:

I attended the very first comicon ever held, incidentally. It was all in one room too, in a Greenwich Village hotel in 1963. Steve Ditko, Fabulous Flo Steinberg, and twenty or thirty high school kids, myself among them. If we only knew where it would lead… […] San Diego Comicon pretty much filled up the entire city of San Diego. Huge, overwhelming, exhausting, a bit scary… one runs out of adjectives. The concom took very good care of me, however, and I had a great time signing, speaking, sweating (it was bloody HOT in San Diego), and tromping up and down the length of the San Diego Convention Center, past hundreds of booths and displays, a giant Lego Batman, and other sights too numerous to mention. There was a very hot Wonder Woman wandering around one day, and an equally hot Mazda RX-8 on display at the Top Cow booth, both of which I lusted after. [2008]

58_He loves giving speeches at Worldcon:

None of us [writers] are exactly strangers to public speaking. Some writers have a standard speech for all occasions, a one-size-fits-all sort of talk. Others write a new speech every year or two. Some wing it. If you are really hard up and/or lazy, you can even take questions from the audience, or ask to do an interview instead of a speech. I confess, I have resorted to all those dodges in my time, at one con or another. A worldcon is different, though. It’s the biggest honor most of us will ever get, unless the Pulitzer Fairy or the Nobel Prize Santa Claus should somehow take note of us, and it requires a real speech.

57_He’s been to nearly every Worldcon since 1971:

I attended my first worldcon in 1971. Noreascon I, in Boston. By then I was already a “filthy pro,” with two — count ’em,two– short story sales to my credit, and another half-dozen stories in my backpack that I thought I could show to editors at the con. (Hoo hah. Doesn’t work that way. The last thing an editor wants is someone thrusting a manuscript at him during a party, when he’s trying to drink and flirt and dicuss the state of the field. What can I say? I was green. It was my second con, my first worldcon). In those days, the Hugo Awards were presented at a banquet. I did not have the money to buy a banquet ticket (I was sleeping on the floor of a fan friend, since I did not have the money for a hotel room either), but they let the non-ticket-holders into the balcony afterwards, and I got to watch Robert Silverberg present the Hugos. Silverbob was elegant, witty, urbane, the winners were thrilled, everyone was well-dressed, and by the end of the evening I knew (1) I wanted to be a part of this world, and (2) one day, I wanted to win a Hugo. Rocket lust. I had it bad.

56_His first novel was sci-fi. It came out in 1977:

DYING OF THE LIGHT was first published by Pocket Books back in the dawn of time (that’s 1977 to you young punks), when Jimmy Carter was in the White House, and I was a college journalism instructor with dark brown hair. I had already been writing and publishing science fiction for six years, many of the stories set against the same future history, a very loose background I later named the Thousand Worlds. Novels were long and scary, but I finally decided I was ready to tackle one in 1976. I wrote the entire thing start to finish before giving it to my agent to sell. My title was AFTER THE FESTIVAL. Pocket, after winning the auction against three other publishers, decided that wasn’t science fictional enough and made me change it. I didn’t mind… much. DYING OF THE LIGHT fit the book just as well. By any title, it was a Thousand Worlds book, probably the culmination of that phase of my career. A melancholy, romantic, elegiac sort of novel it was, but then I was a melancholy romantic myself in those days.

55_He took his time with this debut novel:

I wrote my first novel, DYING OF THE LIGHT, without a contract and without a deadline. No one even knew I was writing a novel until I sent the completed book to Kirby to sell. I wrote FEVRE DREAM the same way. I wrote THE ARMAGEDDON RAG the same way. No contracts, no deadlines, no one waiting. Write at my own pace and deliver when I’m done. That’s really how I am most comfortable, even now.

54_He moved to Hollywood and wrote for TV dramas in the mid-to-late 1980s:

My life and career have developed a frightening momentum. I remember once, when I was out in Hollywood, someone described working on a weekly television series as being akin to madly laying rails as the locomotive roars full steam up the tracks just behind you. I’m not in Hollywood anymore, but life still feels like that some days. Lose a day here and a week there, and suddenly that damn train is rolling over you.

53_He likes to encourage and promote other writers:

Robert A. Heinlein once said he could not possibly pay back all those who helped him when he was starting out, so he believed in paying forward, and helping those who came after him.

52_But he’s bad at saying „no“:

I really really really need to learn to say No. No, I will not come to your convention, thanks for asking. No, I will not read your manuscript/ galley proof/ book, but good luck with that. No, I will not write a story for your anthology, I am a year behind writing stories for my own anthologies. No, I will not write a preface/ introduction/ foreword for your book. No, I will not do an interview. [2012]

51_One of his earliest and darkest stories was recently adapted into a graphic novel:

MEATHOUSE MAN the graphic novel is the work of the amazing and talented Raya Golden, my sometime assistant and all-around minion, and long-time friend and quasi-goddaughter, based on a novelette that I originally wrote for Harlan Ellison’s THE LAST DANGEROUS VISIONS back in the dawn of time (well, mid-70s) and eventually published in Damon Knight’s anthology ORBIT 18. Written at one of the lowest points of my life, the novelette “Meathouse Man” is probably the darkest and most twisted thing I’ve ever written, a story so personally painful to me that I can hardly stand to re-read it even now… that Raya chose this tale, out of all my stories, to adapt and illustrate as a graphic novel, producing a work capable of earning a Hugo nomination… well, that’s just bloody incredible, and a real testament to her dedication, her talent, and her madness. Bravo! [2014]

50_He loved organizing the party for every nominee who did not win a Hugo Award:

In 1980, at Noreascon II, I committed the ultimate sin for a Hugo Loser by winning two Hugos. When I turned up at the party with them in hand, Gardner was waiting with a spray can of whipped cream. He nailed me instead the door, turning my head into a sundae. He even had a maraschino cherry to put on top. (Sadly, no one seems to have taken a picture). (I did get my revenge years later, when Gargy began winning Hugos every year). That double win had endangered my status as a loser, Gardner warned me, but I returned to his good graces the next year at Denvention II, when I lost again, this time to Gordy Dickson. And I’d been so confident of winning that I’d even rented a tuxedo.

.

.

49_In 1985, his life accelerated:

In 1985 I went out to Hollywood to work on TWILIGHT ZONE, and I no longer had the time or energy to organize worldcon parties. I don’t recall exactly how or when the torch was passed, but it was. The parties went on, but I was no longer the one doing them. I believe it was sometime in the 1990s when the Hugo Losers Party somehow became a quasi–official worldcon function, and a tradition arose — don’t know how — of each of them being hosted and run by the following year’s worldcon. [2015]

48_He’s not a fan of retcons and reboots in comic books, and was annoyed when he heard about the 2008 „Spider-Man“ storyline where Peter Parker’s marriage was razed from continuity:

I was puzzled recently when one of my readers emailed me to ask what I thought about what Marvel had done to Spider-Man. I didn’t know what Marvel had done to Spider-Man, but I was curious enough to Google, and pretty soon I found out. Bloody hell. I hate this, and judging from the discussions I am seeing on various blogs, I am not alone. Retconning sucks. Leave the goddamned continuity ALONE, for chrissakes. What happened, happened. Take an old character in a new direction, fine, cool, but don’t go back and mess around with the character’s past. It’s a breach of trust with your audience, as I see it. The DC universe has never really recovered from the Crisis on Infinite Earths, despite all the Crises that have followed, and I think the Marvel universe, and Spidey in particular, will be a long time recovering from this decision. So that’s my two cents. In a nutshell: boo, hiss, shame on you, Marvel. If I had a rotten tomato, I would throw it. [2008]

47_2009, when „A Song of Ice and Fire“ was turned into a pilot for HBO, he was involved in the actors’ casting:

I’ve met Maisie Williams and Sophie Turner (and their charming moms). They’re terrific, bright and beautiful and bursting with enthusiasm, excited to be a part of this.And now I’m having pangs of guilt about all the horrors that they’re going to have to go through in the months and years to come, thanks to me. I’m going to have to rewrite the books so only nice things happen to Arya and Sansa. Might change the story some.

46_He watched lots of audition tapes at home:

The auditions for the part of Ser Ilyn Payne are the strangest I’ve even been witness to. Ser Ilyn has no tongue and no lines, of course, so the actors just have to stand there and look mean & scary, reacting to the dialogue of other characters being read to them by the casting assistants. No words to work with, just their mouth, eyes, facial expressions. Talk about challenging. I know there are aspiring actors and actresses reading this. You guys have all my empathy. It’s a tough, tough profession you’ve chosen. Good luck to all of you. [2011]

45_He was thrilled about Peter Dinklage, Tyrion:

And playing Tyrion Lannister will be Peter Dinklage, who was almost everyone’s “dream casting” for the role (he certainly was mine).

44_He loved that, for the TV show, linguists fleshed out his fictional High Valyrian language:

A few years ago, I got a very nice email from a reader who wanted to know more about the vocabulary and syntax of High Valyrian. I blush to admit that I had to reply, “Uh… well… all I know about High Valyrian is the seven words I’ve made up to date. When I need an eighth, I’ll make that up too… but I don’t have a whole imaginary language in my desk here, the way Tolkien did.”The same was true of Dothraki. Lots of characters speak the language of the horselords in my novels, and I did pepper the text with a few Dothraki words like khal and arakh… but for the most part I was content just to say, “They were speaking Dothraki,” and give the sense of what was said, playing with the syntax and sentence rhythms a bit to convey a flavor.

43_He enjoyed writing the first season episode „The Pointy End“

I actually met a deadline. I turned in the first draft of my script for episode eight of A GAME OF THRONES to David and Dan on the day it was due. Today, as it happens. It’s too long and too expensive, but that’s true of every first draft teleplay and screenplay that I ever wrote.

42_He wrote a complete script. Does that mean: the entire episode?

In a series like this, scenes sometimes get moved from episode to episode, so not everything you’ll see tonight will be mine(except in the sense that is all based on my books, of course). F’rinstance, the bit in the previews, with Tyrion and Bronn in the Mountains of the Moon, that was originally meant to be in episode seven, and was moved into “The Pointy End” during editing. So that scene, and the encounter with the clansmen, was written by David and Dan. Kind of fitting that “The Pointy End” airs even as I am working on my season two script, “Blackwater.” [2011]

41_He visited Ireland and Morocco when the TV pilot was shot. He has met most actors, and likes Sibel Kekilli:

I’ve met some wonderful people through GAME OF THRONES, and Sibel is one of them. What an amazing, talented, courageous young woman. And yes, I confess it: her Shae was better than my Shae. [and, 2014:] We have the best cast in television, and Sibel is a big part of that.

40_For the German program THROUGH THE NIGHT, Martin showed Kekilli Santa Fe. He later came to Hamburg for a reading, and she returned the favor:

Some highlights: Touring MiniatureLand in Hamburg. Wow. Biggest toy train set in the world, but the landscapes and miniatures dwarf the trains. Very glad my hosts took me to see this. Hanging with Sibel Kekilli and her boyfriend, and my German publicist, Sebastian. Sibel fed me Turkish food and showed me some of Hamburg’s nightlife, to reciprocate for the tour of Santa Fe I gave her on INTO THE NIGHT. Hamburg stays up later than Santa Fe, you will be surprised to learn, but chile con queso is nowhere to be found. We drank White Russians while huddled under blankets in an outdoor cafe. Took a canal boat tour as well. [2015]

.

.

39_His writer friend Melinda Snodgrass had trouble with a German robot:

Melinda had STAR COMMAND, her own SF show, which filmed in Germany (ask her about the robot than ran amuck and smashed the set) and should have been picked up for series, but wasn’t.

38_A fictional death that he took hard – and that made him call foul? The second „Alien“ movie is about saving a young kid. When the kid died at the beginning of „Alien 3“, Martin was done with the franchise.

I have never seen the third ALIENS movie. I loved ALIEN and ALIENS, but when I read the early reviews of ALIENS 3, and learned that the new movie was going to open by killing Newt and… what was his name, the Michael Biehn character?… well, I was f*cking outraged. I never went to the film because I did not want that sh*t in my head. I had come to love Newt in the preceding movie, the whole damn film was about Ripley rescuing her, the end was deeply satisfying… and now some asshole was going to come along and piss all over that just to be shocking. I have never seen the subsequent Aliens films either, since they are all part of a fictional “reality” that I refuse to embrace.

37_He was glad about Obamacare:

Many of you reading this blog today are presumably science fiction and fantasy fans. It would probably shock you to know how many of your favorite writers have no health insurance whatsover. Most midlist writers struggle to get by even at the best of times; lean times can be lean indeed. For a self-employed individual, even one who can afford the premiums, insurance can be very hard to find and obscenely expensive when you do find it… and god help you if you have a pre-existing condition, because the insurance companies sure won’t. [2010]

36_He’s liberal, but likes to read Republican and conservative colleagues:

Whenever I make one of these political posts, I always get a rush of emails. Lots of “right on, you said it, I agree” mails from those who share my views, a couple of reasoned and thoughtful dissents (which I value), and a handful of “I am never going to read your books again” screeds. (Those last just make me sad. Not because I have lost a reader, but because such people seem deliberately intent on closing their eyes and shutting down their minds. I grew up reading Robert A. Heinlein, after all, and still have been known to read works by Orson Scott Card, Dan Simmons, Larry Niven, and others whose political views are worlds away from my own. It’s GOOD to read things that challenge your own opinions and preconceptions… or so I have always believed…. [2012]

35_He did object to the Vietnam War, but he’s fascinated by wars and warrior culture:

I was never a warrior. I served in VISTA, not the Army or Air Force, and I opposed the Vietnam War. But I have written a good deal about war and warriors, and read even more about those subjects. Together with Gardner Dozois (a Vietnam era vet), I edited WARRIORS, a mammoth anthology of stories about war and the men and women who fight them. The glories and horrors of war lie at the very center of A SONG OF ICE & FIRE. [2014]

34_He is passionate about the politics and inequalities of TV production:

Let me banish all reality shows from the air! And these ‘talent’ shows too! Instead of shows where assholes and audiences mack mock of wannabees who cannot sing and dance, let’s bring back the variety show and feature really GOOD singers and really GOOD dancers. Oh, and you movie studios… no more replacing screenwriters at the drop of a hat. It should as hard to replace the writer as it is to replace the director. And that “a film by” credit at the beginning of pictures should include the name of BOTH writer and director. The film is by both of them, not just one. And every TV series should be required to take X amount of pitches from freelancer writers and beginners. That used to be mandated by the WGA, and way back when it was how a lot of newcomers got their foot in the door, but these days most shows find ways around it, and breaking in is harder than ever. [2014]

33_He lives in New Mexico, but isn’t too familiar with Old Mexico:

Strange to say, although I have lived in New Mexico since 1979, I have never really visited Old Mexico. Oh, I attended a Westercon in El Paso a few years back, and spent an afternoon in Juarez with some other fans and writers. And I spent a few hours in Tijuana back in the late 80s, I believe, while attending Comicon in San Diego. But that hardly counts. There’s a lot more to Mexico than the border towns. My first real visit to Mexico starts tomorrow, when I jet down to Guadalajara for the Guadalajara International Book Fair. [2016]

32_He bought and re-opened a local cinema in 2013. He often blogs about the movies, and he invites writers and artists like Amanda Palmer and Neil Gaiman to give readings. During these nights, he’s on stage, hosting and asking questions.

The Jean Cocteau is a small Santa Fe art house, with a single screen and 127 seats. It was built in the early 70s as the Collective Fantasy, became the Cocteau later in that decade, went through several local owners who ran it well, and finally became part of the Trans-Lux chain. They closed it in April, 2006, when they shut down their entire chain of theaters. I saw a lot of movies at the Cocteau between 1979, when I moved to Santa Fe, and 2006, when it closed. I like the idea of bringing it back, better than ever. I will not be doing it myself, of course. So please, readers, fans, don’t get nuts. I am a novelist and a screenwriter, not a theatre manager, it won’t be me standing at the concession stand asking if you want butter on your popcorn.

31_He was enraged with Sony pictures when North Korea tried to ban the US comedy movie THE INTERVIEW.

I mean, really? REALLY?? These gigantic corporations, most of which could buy North Korea with pocket change, are declining to show a film because Kim Jong-Un objects to being mocked? The level of corporate cowardice here astonishes me. It’s a good thing these guys weren’t around when Charlie Chaplin made THE GREAT DICTATOR. If Kim Jong-Un scares them, Adolf Hitler would have had them shitting in their smallclothes. Even Sony, which made the movie, is going along. There are thousands of small independent theatres across the country, like my own, that would gladly screen THE INTERVIEW, regardless of the threats from North Korea, but instead of shifting the film to those venues, Sony has cancelled its scheduled Christmas rollout entirely. I haven’t seen THE INTERVIEW. I have no idea how good or bad a film it is. It might be hilarious. It might be stupid and offensive and outrageous. (Actually, I am pretty sure about the ‘outrageous’ part). It might be all of the above. That’s not the point, though. Whether it’s the next CITIZEN KANE or the next PLAN 9 FROM OUTER SPACE, it astonishes me that a major Hollywood film could be killed before release by threats from a foreign power and anonymous hackers. [2014]

30_He bought a huge space for a local Santa Fe artist collective.

Yeah, I bought a bowling alley. Except… well… not really. I bought the former Silva Lanes property on Rufina Circle, a block off Cerrillos Road in south Santa Fe. But there hasn’t been any bowling there since 2009, when Silva Lanes went bankrupt. And, indeed, all the lanes and interior furnishings were ripped out several years ago by a previous “buyer” who then failed to follow through with the purchase. So essentially I bought a huge empty derelict building (some 33,000 square feet) and a big parking lot. The building, instead, will be used for art… not a traditional gallery, now, but a very exciting and innovative interactive art space. The exhibits will be designed and installed by Meow Wolf, a collective of forty-odd (some very odd) artists here in Santa Fe who have been doing some amazing things over the past decade, but have never had a permanent home before. [2015]

.

.

29_He’s friends with lots of sci-fi and fantasy writers and he often meets them at conventions.

Connie Willis and David Gerrold are both friends of mine. I have known David since the early 70s, Connie since the late 70s. Connie, actually, is avery goodfriend of mine. (Don’t be fooled if you have seen us ripping on one another at cons. That’s the George and Connie show.) [He’s also friends with Diana Gabaldon, and likes the OUTLANDER TV show.]

28_If a writer dies, he thinks the best way to honor them is to buy their books:

Kage Baker has died. Check out her books, if you’re not familiar with them. Flowers and donations and tributes are all well and good, but I’ve always felt that the best way to remember any writer is to read their work. Kage’s work deserves to be read and reread for many years to come. It’s sad to think there won’t be any more of it.

27_It’s easy to suggest nominees for the annual Hugo Award, so he blogs personal suggestions and recommendations every Hugo voting season.

Sadly, no, STATION ELEVEN did not get a Hugo nomination. The reports of my vast power and influence within the field seem to be greatly exaggerated. So far as I can tell, my effect on the Hugo nominations is exactly nil. But I’ll keep recommending good stuff anyway. I’m stubborn

26_To him, the Hugo Awards are huge:

There has been much debate of late about the value of a Hugo. Whether or not it has actual monetary value, whether it can boost a writer’s career or lead to larger advances. Back in 1953, no one was thinking that way. Look at those first awards, and you can see what the rocket is all about. The Hugos are an “Attaboy! You did good.” They are SF thanking one of its own for enriching the genre, for giving them pleasure, for producing great work. Also, they come with a really cool trophy. Bottom line, that’s what matters.

25_In 2015, conservative and right-wing sci-fi fans organized their Hugo nominee suggestions, so right-wing titles dominated the Hugo ballot. They called themselves „Sad Puppies“, „Angry Puppies“, „Rabid Puppies“, and Martin became involved in blogging about the whole „Puppygate“ turmoil:

If the Sad Puppies wanted to start their own award… for Best Conservative SF, or Best Space Opera, or Best Military SF, or Best Old-Fashioned SF the Way It Used to Be… whatever it is they are actually looking for… hey, I don’t think anyone would have any objections to that. I certainly wouldn’t. More power to them. But that’s not what they are doing here, it seems to me. Instead they seem to want to take the Hugos and turn them into their own awards. [2015]

24_He’s unhappy about the puppy’s notion that the Hugos „exclude“ straight white male readers by „pushing a Social Justice Warrior agenda“:

Straight white men are being excluded. Really? Really? C’mon, guys. Go look at the last five, ten years of Hugo ballots. Count how many men were nominated. Count how many women. Now count the black writers and the Asian writers and the foreign-language writers. Yes, yes, things are changing. We have a lot more women and minorities being nominated than we did in 1957, say, or even 1987… but the ballots are still way more white and way more male than not. Look, I am hardly going to be in favor of excluding straight white men, being one myself (and no, I am not a fan of Tempest Bradford’s challenge). I am in favor of diversity, of inclusion, of bringing writers from many different backgrounds and cultures into the field. I don’t want straight white writers excluded from the ballot… I just don’t think they need to have ALL of it. I mean, we’re SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY FANS, we love to read about aliens and vampires and elves, are we really going to freak out about Asians and Native Americans? [2015]

23_This debate is not about free speech:

My own politics are liberal… which means I lean left, but not way over to the fringe left. Freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom to dissent, all of that has always been central to my political attitudes. The freedom of the artist to create should be absolute. I have always been against censorship, silencing, McCarthyism. (The McCarthy period, a particular fascination of mine, was one of the blackest eras in American history. The Time of the Toad, Dalton Trumbo called it; Trumbo was one of its victims). ((It should be noted, since idiots always misunderstand this point, that freedom of speech does not mean you can say whatever you want wherever you want. If you want to proclaim that you are the new messiah or call for ethnic cleansing of Martians or even promote your new book, I think you should be able to stand on a soapbox in the park, or start your own website, and do just that. I don’t think free speech requires me to let you into my living room to give your speech, or into my virtual living room here on the internet)). [2015]

22_He spoke up against the puppies’ misogynist attacks against female writers:

Laura Mixon is a “Social Justice Warrior” if ever there was one. Unlike me, she might even accept that label. She cares about social justice. She hates sexism, racism, misogyny. She wants our field to be more inclusive. She has fought her own battles, as an engineer writing hard SF, and being told that women could not write hard SF. Laura is well to the left of me. She’s also a kinder, gentler, and more forgiving person than I am. And yet she did this, devoted months to it, uncounted amounts of efforts… because someone had to, because lives and careers were being ruined, because people were being hurt. I hope she gets a Hugo. For herself, and for all of Hate’s victims. [2015]

21_But the discussions left him worn out:

Yes, I know that THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER named me “the third most powerful writer in Hollywood” last December. You would be surprised at how little that means. I cannot control what anyone else says or does, or make them stop saying or doing it, be it on the fannish or professional fronts. What I can controlis what happens in my books, so I am going to return to that chapter I’ve been writing on THE WINDS OF WINTER now, thank you very much. [2015]

20_To finish up the Puppygate discussion, he posted this link:

I want to single out the postings of Eric Flint. The latest, at http://www.ericflint.net/index.php/2015/06/09/a-response-to-brad-torgersen/, is a devastating point-by-point deconstruction and refutation of the latest round of Puppystuff from Brad Torgersen. Flint says what I would have said, if I had the time or the energy, but he says it better than I ever could.

.

.

19_He writes his novels on an old word processor.

What do I know about this Interweb thingie? I still tie messages to the legs of ravens

18_No one has EVER asked him who his favorite „Song of Ice and Fire“ character was.

On some of the foreign trips, I did entire days of interviews. They would park me in a hotel suite, usher in a journalist or a film crew, we’d talk for a half hour, then my hosts would escort that reporter out, and bring in a new one. Some of the journalists were very sharp. Some… ah… weren’t. (A few made me wonder what the hell has happened to the standards of the profession that I once got my degrees in, back at Northwestern.) Sitting around a hotel room talking doesn’t sound so hard, but it can be grueling. Especially when they all ask the same damn questions. (Tyrion is my favorite character. Okay? OKAY? Can we PLEASE put that one to rest?? [2014]

17_He enjoyed working on the companion source book THE WORLD OF ICE AND FIRE.

Which we’ve been working on (along with many other things) lo, these many years. ((And yes, yes, it’s late, what else is new? Please do not blame my faithful collaborators, Elio Garcia and Linda Antonsson. They finished their part ages ago, and tossed the ball to me. What can I say? I remain as slow as ever. And I added a lot.)) [2014]

16_He likes that HBO doesn’t have strict time constraints:

Tonight the Season 4 finale of GAME OF THRONES on HBO. Longest episode of the season. One of the things I love about HBO is that you can take as long as you need to tell your story, you’re not locked into the rigid 46-minutes-and-change-to-the-second of the broadcast networks. [2014]

15_He’s fine with nudity.

GAME OF THRONES is often slammed for showing too many breasts. As are other cable shows. And of course you can’t show them at all on broadcast television. Only in America. Why do so many people in this country go mad at the sight of a nipple?

14_He enjoyed the GoT essay collection BEYOND THE WALL.

As the subject of these essays, I will be the first to admit that I have a skewed perspective here. Nonetheless, I think [James] Lowder put together a strong, balanced, and diverse collection of essays, and the quality of writing here was distinctly higher than in some similar volumes. I think I would have enjoyed reading this one even if it WASN’T all about me myself and I. Read it for yourself, and decide.

13_His former assistant/minion Ty Franck is one of the two novelists of THE EXPANSE, a series of sci-fi novels that recently got a TV adaptation.

THE EXPANSE: This is the show that fandom has been waiting for since FIREFLY and BATTLESTAR GALACTICA left the air… a real kickass spaceship show, done right.

12_He enjoys „Westworld“ on HBO. [So I assume he’s fine with Westworld’s many, many Emmy nominations in 2017.]

How many of you have been watching HBO’s big new drama WESTWORLD? If not, you don’t know what you’re missing. It’s intriguing. The old Yul Brynner / Michael Crichton movie was just the seed, this one goes way way way beyond that. It’s gorgeous to look at, and the writing and acting and directing are all first rate.

11_He’s executive producing a new TV show for HBO:

Yes, HBO is developing Nnedi Okorafor’s novel WHO FEARS DEATH as a series. Yes, I am attached to the project, as an Executive Producer. I am pleased and excited to confirm that much. I met Nnedi a few years ago, and I’m a great admirer of her work. She’s an exciting new talent in our field, with a unique voice.

10_He has several other TV projects:

I have three shows in various stages of development under the aegis of my overall deal with HBO. There’s CAPTAIN COSMOS for HBO (scripted by Michael Cassutt), there’s SKIN TRADE for Cinemax (to be scripted by Kalinda Vasquez), and there’s a third project in the very early stages that I am not allowed to talk about yet. There’s also WILD CARDS, but that’s at a different studio and I am not involved with it, except to license rights, sign the check, and distribute funds to my writers. Oh, and on the movie side, we seem to be moving toward production on IN THE LOST LANDS, an adaptation of three of my old stories.

.

.

09_There might be even more upcoming movies and TV shows:

When I say, “my plate is full,” I don’t just mean with WINDS. I am still editing the latest Wild Cards volume, HIGH STAKES. I have an overall deal with HBO, and three new television concepts in various stages of development, with a variety of collaborators and partners. I am consulting on a couple of videogames. There’s the Wild Cards movie at Universal, where I’m a producer. [2015]

08_He’s not sure if HBO would conclude GAME OF THRONES in a series of feature films:

I see that this new crop of stories also raises, once again, the notion of concluding the series with one or more feature films. And in some of these stories, once again, this idea is wrongly attributed to me. Let me state, yet again, that while I love this idea, it did NOT originate with me. It was a notion suggested to me, which I have enthusiastically endorsed… but since I was the first person to raise the possibility in public, somehow I am being seen as its father. Sure, I love the idea. Why not? What fantasist would not love the idea of going out with an epic hundred million feature film? And the recent success of the IMAX experience shows that the audience is there for such a movie. If we build it, they will come. But will we build it? I have no bloody idea. [2015]

07_He wants to write more DUNK AND EGG stories.

It has always been my intent to write a whole series of novellas about Dunk and Egg, chronicling their entire lives. At various times in various interviews I may have mentioned seven novellas, or ten, or twelve, but none of that is set in stone. There will be as many novellas as it takes to tell their tale, start to finish. But only the three mentioned have been published to date. [20014]

06_He’s not worried that the TV show overtook the novels:

How many children did Scarlett O’Hara have? Three, in the novel. One, in the movie. None, in real life: she was a fictional character, she never existed. The show is the show, the books are the books; two different tellings of the same story. There have been differences between the novels and the television show since the first episode of season one. And for just as long, I have been talking about the butterfly effect. Small changes lead to larger changes lead to huge changes. […] we hope that the readers and viewers both enjoy the journey. Or journeys, as the case may be. Sometimes butterflies grow into dragons. [2015]

05_He enjoys the differences between the TV show and the novels:

Jhiqui, Aggo, Jhogo, Jeyne Poole, Dalla (and her child) and her sister Val, Princess Arianne Martell, Prince Quentyn Martell, Willas Tyrell, Ser Garlan the Gallant, Lord Wyman Manderly, the Shavepate, the Green Grace, Brown Ben Plumm, the Tattered Prince, Pretty Meris, Bloodbeard, Griff and Young Griff, and many more have never been part of the show, yet remain characters in the books. Several are viewpoint characters, and even those who are not may have significant roles in the story to come in THE WINDS OF WINTER and A DREAM OF SPRING.

04_He’s annoyed that THE WINDS OF WINTER isn’t done.

Unfortunately, the writing did not go as fast or as well as I would have liked. You can blame my travels or my blog posts or the distractions of other projects and the Cocteau and whatever, but maybe all that had an impact… you can blame my age, and maybe that had an impact too…but if truth be told, sometimes the writing goes well and sometimes it doesn’t, and that was true for me even when I was in my 20s. And as spring turned to summer, I was having more bad days than good ones. Around about August, I had to face facts: I was not going to be done by Halloween. I cannot tell you how deeply that realization depressed me. [2016]

03_But he has lots of side projects and passions:

And yes, before someone asks,I AM STILL WORKING ON WINDS OF WINTER and will continue working on it until it’s done. I will confess, I do wish I could clone myself, or find a way to squeeze more hours into the day, or a way to go without sleep. But this is what it is, so I keep on juggling. WINDS OF WINTER, five successor shows, FIRE AND BLOOD (that’s the GRRMarillion, remember?), four new Wild Cards books, some things I can’t tell you about yet… it’s a good thing I love my work. [2017]

02: Wait – five successor shows?

Some of the reports of these developments seem to suggest that HBO might be adding four successor shows to the schedule to replace GAME OF THRONES. Decades of experience in television and film have taught me that nothing is ever really certain… but I do think it’s very unlikely that we’ll be getting four (or five) series. At least not immediately. What we do have here is an order for four — now five — pilotscripts. How many pilots will be filmed, and how many series might come out of that, remains to be seen. [2016]

01: He’s nearly 70 and calls himself „fat“ – but his health is quite good. His only major hospital stay was in 2010:

I’ve just lived through the Christmas from hell. Most of it was spent in a bed in St. Vincent’s Hospital in Santa Fe. Parris took me in to the hospital emergency room on the morning of Christmas Eve, and they admitted me almost immediately after diagnosis. It seems I had a raging e-coli infection of my urinary tract. Urosepsis, they called it. […] I don’t want to trivilize what I’ve just gone through. I’m a generally healthy guy, and this was the most serious bout of illness I have suffered in decades, and the first time I have seen the inside of a hospital (emergency room visits aside) since 1973. But I am on the mend now, and I expect to be back to my old self by the end of the month at the latest, and back to work well before that. [early 2011]

.

my final, 100th observation:

He’s been remarkably silent or one-note on „Wonder Woman“ and „Harry Potter“. I don’t think he likes them much. But he’s been REALLY quiet about „Star Wars: The Force Awakens“ and „Rogue One“. He has been watching J.J. Abram’s „Star Trek“ reboot and did not like it at all.

Saw the new STAR TREK movie last night. No spoilers here, just a resounding thumbs down.

In 2009, he wrote about „Lost“:

I sure hope those guys doing LOST have something better up planned for us. Though if it turns out to be They Were All Dead All Along I’m really going to be pissed.

I know that by that point, J.J. Abrams wasn’t very involved with „Lost“ anymore. But I still suspect that Martin has some issue with Abrams’ writing or storytelling, but is polite enough to not elaborate on it.

.

.

[looking for more of my work in English? Here’s an interview with author Ayelet Waldman, and here’s one with Saleem Haddad. Und, auf Deutsch: Notizen zur ersten Staffel “Westworld”.]

“Junge Freiheit”, “Achse des Guten”, “Tichys Einblick”, AfD: Sprache & Vokabeln

.

Ich würde niemandem, der schreibt, er seit Minimalstaatler oder Freilerner, er liebe seine Heimat oder er sei gegen Zensur, vorwerfen:

Dann bist du rechts – keine Frage.

.

Auf Twitter aber sehe ich immer wieder eine Blase, einen politischen Kosmos, der mich abstößt und der mir Angst macht.

Hier kurz gesammelt: die Phrasen, Codes, Signalworte, Floskeln und Stichworte, die dort IMMER wieder auftauchen.

.

abmerkeln | Altparteien | Anarchokapitalist | Antiantifa | Armenimport | Asylindustrie | aufrecht | besorgte Bürger | betreutes Denken, Erziehungsmedien | bin im Shadowban | Blockwart | braver Steuerzahler | ceterum censeo | das Volk wird ausgetauscht | demografischer Terror | Demokratur | Denkverbot | denkende Bevölkerung, (klar) denkender Teil der Bevölkerung | deutscher Michel, deutsche Lemminge | direkte Demokratie | eigentümlich frei | einer, der schon länger hier lebt | Einzelfall | Einzeltäter | entbrüsseln | Erhalt der Heimat | EUdssr | Festung Europa | Flintenuschi | Flüchtlingsproblematik | frei sozial national | Freilerner | Freiwilligkeit | Frühsexualisierung | für Meinungsfreiheit und direkte Demokratie | gab.ai, #gabfam, #deutschfam | Gedankenpolizei | Gefährder | (der Islam u.a.) gehört nicht zu Deutschland | Geldsystemkritiker | Gendergaga | Genderismus | Gender-Mainstreaming | Genderterror | Genosse | Germany first | Gesinnungsterror | gesundes Volksempfinden | gleichgeschaltet, Gleichschaltung | Gutmensch | Heimat verteidigen! | heimatbewusst, Heimatschutz | herrschaftsfrei | Herz am rechten Fleck | heterophob | Homolobby | Ich bin kein Rassist, aber | Ich bin Patriot | Ich liebe mein Land | identitär | illegale Migranten | Immigrationskritik | Invasorenwelle | ISlam | Islamisierung | Kartellparteien | kartoffeldeutsch | Kekistan | Kinderfickersekte | Klartext, Tacheles, unbequem, Querdenker, Mund verbieten, gegen Zensur | Klimalüge | konservativ-freiheitlich | Koppverlag | Köterrasse | Kulturbereicherer | Kuscheljustiz | Landeshochverrat | lieber stehend sterben als kniend leben | linke Hetze | linke Zecke | Linksextremismus | Linksfaschismus | Linksmaden | Linksnicker | Lügenpresse | Machtelite | Machtwechsel | Männerrechtler, Männerbeauftragter, Maskulist, MRA | Maulkorb, mundtot, Stasi | mehr Freiheit – weniger Staat! Freiheit statt Sozialismus! | Meinungsdiktat, Meinungsdiktatur, Mediendiktatur | Merkel wählen, Leichen zählen | Merkelei | Merkelregime | Minimalstaat | Nafri | nationalkonservativ | national-liberal | Nationalstolz | Neger, Bimbo | neokonservativ, alt-right | Neusprech | Opferindustrie | Pack, Deplorable, #ichbinpack | Pizzagate | politisch inkorrekt | Propagandaschau | Realitätsverweigerer | rechte Ecke | Redpill | Remigration, Rückführungshelfer | Scheinasylant | schweigende Mehrheit | sozial-libertär | Sozialparadies | Sozialschmarotzer | Sozialtourist | Steuerstaat, Superstaat | Steuern sind Raub | Stiftung der Schande | systemkonform, Bevormundung | systemkritisch | Systempresse | Teuro | think blue, blaues Wunder | Trigger-Warning, Safe Space, Snowflake | Tugendterror | Tugendwächter | Überfremdung | Umerziehung | Umvolkung | unkontrollierte Einwanderung, Zuwanderung, Masseneinwanderung | unsere Heimat | Untergang, zugrunde richten, schafft sich ab | Unterwerfung | vaterländisch, Vaterland | Verfassungspatriot, “Ich liebe das Grundgesetz” | Verschwulung | völkisch | Volksverräter | Voluntarismus | “wer halb Kalkutta aufnimmt” | wertkonservativ | wertvoller als Gold | Wirtschaftsflüchtling | Zensurland | zuwanderungskritisch | Zwangsgebühren | zwei (volks-)deutsche Eltern, vier (volks-)deutsche Großeltern

#achgut
#afdwaehlen
#alllivesmatter
#alternativemedien
#antisystem
#banislam
#bluehand
#dankeerikasteinbach
#defendeurope, #defendgermany
#deraustausch
#endgov
#fakerefugees
#fckislm
#freekolja
#gegenlinks
#gegenzecken
#grueneversenken
#ichbinpack
#islambeiuns
#jungefreiheit
#merkelmussweg
#multikultitötet
#PCkills
#proborders
#propolizei
#refugeesnotwelcome
#taxationistheft
#thewestisbest
#tichyseinblick
#traudichdeutschland

Sexismus im Studium, Sexismus an Schreibschulen: Kreatives Schreiben & Kulturjournalismus, Hildesheim

.

.

Seit Ende Juni 2016 erscheinen im Blog von “Merkur – Deutsche Zeitschrift für europäisches Denken” Texte über strukturelle Probleme, Sexismus und Machtgefälle an Schreibschulen und -Instituten in Deutschland und der Schweiz – gesammelt, redaktionell betreut und wunderbar lektoriert von Lena Vöcklinghaus und Alina Herbig. Bisher sind diese Essay ins drei großen Dossiers gesammelt und nachzulesen:

[Update:

.

.

Heute erscheint das vierte Dossier, mit u.a. einem Text von mir:

ein persönliches Essay über Microaggressions – alles, was Menschen sagen, um sich zu zeigen “Achtung: Wir sind nicht gleich. Hier verläuft eine Grenze: Ich bin auf der besseren Seite. Dein Pech!” Kurze Szenen, Momente, die mich im Studium verunsicherten oder bremsten.

Und viel von dem, was ich anderen Leuten antat – aus Geltungsdrang, Arroganz, aus Ungeduld oder Wut.

.

Am 8. Juli las ich eine 12-Minuten-Version des Textes am Literarischen Colloquium Berlin. Für den Merkur-Blog habe ich diese Kurzversion ausgeweitet, umgestellt: Wer 15 Minuten Zeit hat – drüben auf Merkur-Zeitschrift.de steht alles, was ich dringend zur Debatte beitragen will. Wie in allen Beiträgen dort sind die Namen aller Lehrenden anonymisiert (“der Professor”, “die Professorin”): Es geht um strukturelle Zustände, Grundsätzliches. Nicht um einzelne Personen.

Hier im Blog, in einer längeren Version, wird es präziser, persönlicher, anekdotischer, ausführlicher: ein langer Text, der möglichst konkret, detailliert erzählt, was in fünf Jahren holperte und glückte, schief lief oder mich überraschte. Hier benutze ich Klarnamen; in einigen Fällen Kürzel wie A, Ö, X.

Der Text sammelt die Schwierigkeiten und Probleme. Ein anderer Text, als Gegengewicht: “Stephan Porombka: 100 Fragen”

.

Austeilen, Abgrenzen, Angstmachen, Einstecken.

Fünf Jahre als Schreibschüler

von Stefan Mesch

.

Du schreibst.

Du willst vom Schreiben leben.

Du bist 14, 15, 16 und führst Tagebuch, stellst Filmkritiken ins Netz, gehst zur Schüler-, dann zur Lokalzeitung. Du gründest ein Fan-Magazin zu „Sailor Moon“.

Du liest Videospiel-Testberichte, Comics, Science Fiction, Stephen King; du liest jedes Wort der Fernsehzeitung und suchst Filme mit möglichst vielen Sternchen, Punkten in den Kategorien „Kultfaktor“ und „Anspruch“.

Du machst Abitur und hast – dank Tipps in Magazinen, dank Zufallsfunden in der Fußgängerzone, ab 16 dank dem Internet – jetzt Lieblingsautoren, Lieblingsdrehbuchautoren, Lieblingskritiker, Lieblingsjournalisten. Du hast ein Dutzend Lieblingsserienschöpfer und liest Hunderte Interviews über ihre Arbeit.

Du machst Zivildienst, du wirst 20 und weißt, wie Thomas Wolfe zum Autor wurde – in Harvard, kurz nach dem ersten Weltkrieg. Wie Janet Frame oder Simone de Beauvoir ihre literarische Arbeit organisierten – in Intellektuellenzirkeln der 60er, 70er. Wie Kevin Williamson Drehbücher umsetzen konnte – Mitte der 90er. Doch du weißt nicht, wie man in Deutschland schreiben kann: 2003, in einem Dorf zwischen Heidelberg, Karlsruhe und Heilbronn.

Du kennst keine Schriftsteller*innen, Kritiker*innen persönlich. Keiner, der mit dir spricht, geht in die Oper, sammelt Kunst, studierte Geisteswissenschaften, arbeitet beim Film.

Du hast keine Lieblings-Serienschöpferin – weil Serien fast nur von Männern geschrieben werden. Du hast keine Lieblingskritikerin, -Journalistin, weil fast keine Frauen für die Filmzeitschriften, die es im Supermarkt gibt, schreiben. In 13 Schuljahren hast du keine 30 Bücher von Autorinnen gelesen, und keine fünf davon im Unterricht.

.

DSC00989 (3)

.

zwei:

Du bist normal. Deine Eltern sind getrennt – doch dein Vater hilft dir beim Umzug. Er verdient so viel, dass du nicht BaFög-berechtigt bist. Deine Schulfreunde werden Grundschullehrerin, Pädagogin, Pädagogin, Realschullehrerin, Bankberater, Programmierer. Einer macht eine Ausbildung zum Fotografen in der Kreisstadt: Er tut dir Leid. Eine studiert Medizin, 600 Kilometer nördlich: Sie macht dich stolz. Doch dich enttäuscht, keine künftigen Architekten, Rechtsanwälte, Kulturarbeiterinnen, Politikerinnen zu kennen.

Du kennst keine Punks, keine Aktivisten, keine Lesben und nur einen Schwulen, das Abitur machst du ohne Muslime oder Menschen mit Behinderung. Kein Mensch aus deinem Freundeskreis lebte als Teenager je in Miete: Alle Eltern haben Häuser, Garagen, sichere Jobs.

Du bist normal gebildet. Das heißt, du kennst die Kiwi-Taschenbücher – doch „Kiepenheuer & Witsch“ hast du noch nie gehört. Du weißt, dass auf der Seite der Rhein-Neckar-Zeitung, die mit „Feuilleton“ betitelt ist, Konzert- und Opernkritiken erscheinen. Du liest 30 Bücher im Jahr und gehst fünf, sechsmal in Theater – doch Ingeborg Bachmann, Adorno, Klopstock, Thomas Bernhard, Christian Kracht, Rainald Goetz? Niemand, den du kennst, erwähnt solche Namen. Im vierten Semester lernst du das Wort „Poetik“.

Dein Vater ist KfZ-Meister und prahlt damit, im ganzen Leben kein Buch gelesen zu haben. Deine Mutter ist Arzthelferin, seit der Ausbildung im Bertelsmann-Club – und in vier heiklen Schwangerschaften las sie wochenlang im Bett: Johannes Mario Simmel, Utta Danella, Konsalik. Suhrkamp ist dir ein Begriff – denn 15, 20 Suhrkamp-Paperbacks stehen in der Wohnwand. Alle von Hermann Hesse und Isabel Allende.

In der Lokalredaktion der Zeitung schreiben keine Frauen. Es gab den Pfarrer mit Büchern im Büro, und in der Kreisstadt zwei, drei Gymnasiallehrer und Buchhändler. Im Jahr, als du dein Abitur bestehst, schafft Joey aus „Dawson’s Creek“ den Sprung auf eine Elite-Uni: Sie studiert Kreatives Schreiben. Dawson aus „Dawson’s Creek“ arbeitet an Drehbüchern: Er schafft es auf die Filmhochschule. Du googelst „Kreatives Schreiben“ und „Filmhochschule“ – und, zur Sicherheit, „Medienwissenschaften“ und „Psychologie“.

.

.

drei:

Ein Professor sagt, es bräuchte eigentlich ein ganzes erstes Semester – nur, um allen beizubringen, wie man lebt, schläft, kocht und sich ernährt. Du weißt bis heute nicht, ob er damit Grundlagen, Routinen, erstes Ankommen im Studium meint. Oder Lebenskunst und Bildungsbürger-Basics wie „Welchen Wein trinke ich zu Austern?“. Im ersten Semester empfiehlt er, Bachs Kunst der Fuge zu hören – um ein Gefühl für Timing in Texten zu entwickeln. Im fünften Semester empfiehlt er einen Monblanc-Füller für 500 Euro.

Dein Psychologie-Lehrbuch sagt im Kapitel zu Belastungen: 150 Punkte áuf der Stress-Skala werfen Menschen meist aus der Bahn. Der Tod eines Bruders, einer Schwester hat 80 Punkte. Ein Studienbeginn für sich allein schon über 100.

Die Filmhochschule Ludwigsburg verlangt den Nachweis eines Praktikums in der Branche: Du kennst niemanden beim Film – und bewirbst dich nicht. Die HFF Potsdam lädt dich zum Auswahlgespräch ein – doch das Komitee findet deine Urteile über Filme, Bücher gernegroß. Du triffst den Ton nicht. Aber weißt nicht, wen du hättest fragen können, um ihn zu treffen.

Das Literaturinstitut Leipzig lädt dich ein – doch das Studium dauert nur drei Jahre. Wer dort studiert, ist oft schon Mitte 20: Du sagst in der Prüfung, dass du mit Älteren, die Abschlüsse in Europarecht und Kirchenmusik haben oder gelernter Steinmetz sind, nicht mithalten kannst.

Deine Mutter fährt dich an alle drei Unis. Ihr übernachtet in Pensionen. Nichts an Hildesheim macht dir Angst, schüchtert dich ein. Zum Studienbeginn gibt dir dein Vater ein gebrauchtes Auto. Deine Mutter hilft oft bei der Miete.

.

.

vier:

Wie viele bewarben sich: 400? Neun Frauen, fünf Männer kommen durch: Julia hat ein Kind, Nora wird schwanger. Lucias Eltern kommen aus Rumänien und China. Jan wuchs in Marseille auf. Martin macht Live-Rollenspiele. Xs Mutter lebt mit einer Frau zusammen. Y war auf einem Jesuiten-Internat.

Noch nie nahmen dich so verschiedene, erfahrene Frauen ernst: A ist gelernte Kosmetikerin, B jobbte im Kino, C schreibt für Focus Online, D verkaufte ein Jahr lang Brötchen. Alles beeindruckt dich – denn du hast keine älteren Geschwister oder Freunde, und bist noch heute unsicher bei Menschen, vier, fünf Jahre älter: Thomas Klupp, Wiebke Porombka, Paul Brodowsky… Wer dir zwei Schritte voraus ist, macht dir Angst. Du hältst Abstand – damit niemand denkt, du willst dich ranschmeißen.

Der Frauenanteil liegt bei 80, 85 Prozent – unter den Studierenden. Fast alle Kurse am Literaturinstitut leiten Männer. 2008, du bist fast fertig, bewerben sich ein Mann und eine Frau auf eine Professur. Beide langweilen dich. Der Mann erhält den Job. „Warum hörst du die Vorträge?“, fragt Sabrina. „Das ist wie ‘CSI’. Ich weiß, wie Hanns-Josef Ortheil spricht. Wie Stephan Porombka spricht. Die Fälle aller CSI-Versionen sind austauschbar. Die Ermittler nicht!“ Du hättest gern noch einen anderen Sound gehört. Verschiedene Arbeitsweisen, Zugriffe, Gemüter.

Dein Hauptfach: Kreatives Schreiben und Kulturjournalismus. Dein Nebenfach: Film, Theater, Medien. Dazu Musik oder Kunst. Und Politik, oder Psychologie, oder Pädagogik, oder Philosophie.

.

DSCF0538

.

fünf:

Über Jahre wirst du ermuntert, über euch, die Stadt, dein Lernen und Scheitern zu sprechen: 2005 führen Erstsemester Tagebuch. Als Tutor liest und kürzt du alle Texte und montierst daraus ein 400-Seiten-Projekt, „Kulturtagebuch: Leben und Schreiben in Hildesheim“. Ortheil spornt dich in jeder Phase an. Du fühlst dich in keinem Wort als Nestbeschmutzer.

2008 veröffentlichst du einen 20-Seiten-Text über die Tiefschläge und privaten Konflikte deines ersten Semesters. 2012 schreibst du das Vorwort der jährlichen „Landpartie“-Anthologie. 2014, für „Irgendwas mit Schreiben: Diplomschriftsteller im Beruf“ listet du deine Ziele als Autor auf. Hildesheim bringt dir bei, kritisch auf Orte und dich selbst zu blicken. Ambivalenzen für ein Publikum greif- und sichtbar zu machen.

2004 bittet Stephan Porombka, je 100 Digitalfotos zu sammeln, in denen sich die Stadt zeigt und erklärt. 2005 sollt ihr eine Hildesheimer Bushaltestelle beobachten, 2007 ein Semester lang eine Kneipe eurer Wahl besuchen, mit Gästen sprechen, ethnografisch über das Milieu schreiben. Ihr lernt, die Stadt zu öffnen. Eure Positionen zu hinterfragen. Euch selbst beim Beobachten zu beobachten.

.

.

sechs:

Du bist enttäuscht, dass ein Student den Grundkurs Kreatives Schreiben leitet – statt Ortheil selbst. Dich ärgert, dass es kein Seminar für euch 14 Auserwählte gibt – sondern alle Kurse auch dem größeren Fachbereich offen stehen: Kulturwissenschafts-Student*innen, „KuWis“.

Fast alle KuWis, mit denen du sprichst, wollten auf Musik-, Kunst-, Schauspielschulen – und scheiterten an der Eignungsprüfung. Dich ärgert, wie viele Leute, die „nur mal testen wollen“ statt beruflich zu schreiben, in allen Seminaren hängen, und dort vor allem über Unlust, Zweifel sprechen.

Als du studentische Anthologien betreust, Texte lektorierst, hörst du fast nur „Ich schreibe eigentlich nie“ und „Für mich ist das ganz neu“. In endlosen gemeinsamen Überarbeitungen – in Absprache mit KuWis, die nie vorhatten und sich nie zutrauten, druckreife Texte zu liefern – macht ihr Texte stärker. Du lernst, respektvoll, konstruktiv zu lektorieren; doch ärgerst dich, dass du so viele unwillige Jüngere anfeuerst, mentorierst – statt selbst gecoacht zu werden.

In deinen Kunst- und Psychologie-Kursen sind KuWis. Vor allem aber Leute aus der Region, die auf Lehramt studieren: Viele haben keinen Mut oder keine Mittel, fürs Studium den Landkreis zu verlassen. Die Kunstseminare sind schleppend und verschult. Die Psychologie-Professorin tut dir Leid, weil alle drei Minuten jemand kräht „Hä? Kommt das in der Klausur?“ oder „Sie – ich raff es einfach nicht!“

Statt mit Ortheil im kleinen, elitären Kreis an eigenen Texten zu arbeiten, stehst du in tausend kalten Wassern. Brauchst deine Zeit, Energie für interdisziplänere Versuche, Projekte, Pflichtaufgaben, bei denen ein Fünftel professionell schreiben will – der Rest nur fragt, warum ihr aggressiven Schnösel alles ändern, lektorieren, verwerten müsst: fürs Radio, auf Lesungen, in Anthologien, im Netz.

Du hältst viele KuWis für Störfaktoren, Ballast – und hast Angst, selbst nur Ballast zu sein: Jo Lendle gibt eine Textwerkstatt, geht zwar auf jeden Text respektvoll ein… doch sagt am Ende, er habe ein höheres Niveau, weniger Anfänger erwartet.

Porombka und Ortheil bieten erst nach fünf Monaten Feedback zu je einem Text eurer Wahl. Porombka nennt deine Erzählung „Trash“. Ortheil findet dich sprachlich unpräzise – und empfiehlt Hemingways Kurzsätze als Gegenmittel.

In den Semesterferien liest du zwölf Bücher von Hemingway.

.

.

sieben:

Du willst, dass alle gut sind. Wäre jemand schlecht, hieße das: Auch du bist vielleicht schlecht. Die Eignungsprüfung irrte. Dir fehlt das Zeug zum Autor.

K bricht das Studium ab. Weil K Kulturjournalismus wichtiger ist als Literatur, fragt Ä: Was, wenn ich falsch bin hier – mit meinem Journalismus-Schwerpunkt? War K unerwünscht? Fühlte sie sich unwillkommen?

Ö ist Filmexpertin und schreibt eine Rezension zu Philip K. Dick und „Blade Runner“. Porombka will, dass sie den Text überarbeitet. Sie ist nervös, verunsichert – und auch nach mehreren Mails bleibt ihr Text unveröffentlicht. Ö fragt sich, ob Porombka sie für nervig, talentlos hält. Sie schreibt nie wieder für die Uni Rezensionen.

Ü schreibt eine Comedy-Kurzgeschichte für die Jahrgangsanthologie. Mit Comedy kann keiner der Lehrenden viel anfangen. Er bewirbt sich für ein Sat.1-Förderprogramm, macht im zweiten Semester einen Workshop in Berlin, tritt im Studium kürzer – und hat bald eine Karriere als TV-Autor. Ä fragt sich jahrelang: Freut sich das Institut über den Erfolg? Oder tat Ü gut daran, zu gehen?

Du besuchst jede Ortheil-Veranstaltung, die dir offen steht. Du hörst irrsinnig gern zu – vor allem, weil dir sein Ton, seine Helden, sein Blick meist neu und fremd sind. Du kaufst, liest Ortheil-Bücher und weißt: Du wirst, kannst, willst niemals über seine Themen schreiben, in seiner Sprache.

Du magst „Sailor Moon“ – weil dort keine fähige, heroische Ausnahme-Frau für sich allein steht. Sondern zehn verschiedene Frauen mit eigenen Wesenszügen aneinander wachsen – ohne, dass die Serie sie gegeneinander stellt: Es gibt dort keine korrekte, einzig gültige Art, Heldin zu sein.

Ortheils Wissen ist dir ein Gewinn. Als Role Model macht er dir Angst: Was Ortheils Texte auszeichnet, kannst du dir nicht erarbeiten. Und was von dem, was du sagen, geben kannst, wird jemand suchen, kaufen, hören, feiern, der sonst Hanns-Josef Ortheil sucht, kauft, einlädt, feiert?

Bei vier Romanciers, zehn Professor*innen, fünf CSI-Ermittler*innen, zehn Kriegerinnen… lastet viel weniger Druck auf jedem möglichen Vorbild, Beispiel.

.

.

acht:

Ä fragt sich, ob die Professoren Poetry Slams verachten. Ä fragt sich, ob die Professoren Sozialkritik verachten. Ä fragt sich so lange, was die Professoren interessiert, bis sie sicher ist, dass IHRE Texte die Professoren nie interessieren werden. Sie schreibt immer weniger. Ihr streitet viel: Du hältst ihre Ängste für selbsterfüllende Prophezeiungen.

Die Professoren helfen zwei Männern aus dem Jahrgang, einen Verlag zu gründen, der zukünftig alle Studiengangsprojekte verlegt. Ä fragt sich, warum sie nicht gefragt wurde, und diese Gespräche geheim blieben.

Ortheil mag die Kurzgeschichten von B, lässt sie in einem eigenen Buch des neuen Verlags drucken: als Teaser, um B an Publikumsverlage zu vermitteln. Ihr fragt euch, ob ihr schreiben solltet wie B, was er an B besonders mag und, ob ihr keine Chance auf seine Hilfe habt, wenn ihr anders schreibt.

Porombka beschäftigt zwei männliche HiWis. Ä fürchtet, Porombka kann nur mit Männern.

Du brauchst viel Zeit, Ä zuzuhören – während sie fragt, welche Professoren oder älteren Studenten wann, wie, mit wem sprechen: Wer wird eingeladen, eingebunden, wer wird gelobt – wer nicht? Ä fragt: „Denkst du, der findet mich langweilig?“, „Denkst du, der findet mich hässlich?“, „Denkst du, wenn ich femininer, zustimmender wäre, hätte ich andere Jobs und Positionen hier?“

.

.

neun:

Du kennst ein Journalisten-Liebespaar, bis heute Inbegriff deiner liebsten Beziehungsdynamik: Clark Kent und Lois Lane. In Hildesheim suchst du eine Partnerin oder einen Partner, die oder der selbst schreibt.

Du fühlst dich nur ambitioniert-verbissenen Schreiber*innen nah: KuWis fehlt oft Schreiblust, Selbstbewusstsein, die Legitimitation durch Ortheil und Porombka. Lehrämtler*innen sind für dich Hufflepuffs: Du hasst, so oft als einziger Schreiber eines Psychologie- und Kunstkurses Schreib-Zeit zu verlieren.

Ä schlägt vor, im benachbarten Hannover zu daten. „Wen finde ich da? Da gibt es keine Schreibschule!“ Du ignorierst Hannover fünf Jahre lang.

Hildesheim ist recht arm, schroff, fromm – es gibt kaum Lesungspublikum: Student*innen bleiben in einer Blase. Du fühlst dich reicher, verdienstvoller, gebildeter als fast jeder, den du auf der Straße siehst.

In einem Filmseminar zur Nouvelle Vague sollen alle kurz sagen, was sie mit Nouvelle Vague verbinden. Von 60 Studierenden sind 55 Frauen, und gut ein Drittel sagt „Mein Vater hatte diese Filme archiviert, führte mich sehr früh an sie heran. Ich wurde mit ihnen erwachsen.“ Dein Vater weiß nicht, was Nouvelle Vague ist. Du gehst – weil du nicht hören willst, wie 20 höhere Töchter jede Woche von ihrer Bildungsbürger-Kindheit schwärmen.

Du ignorierst KuWi-Theaterstücke – verpasst Performerinnen, Regisseurinnen. Du ignorierst KuWi-Konzerte – merkst viel zu spät, wie ambitioniert viele Musik-KuWis studieren. Dich langweilt Hochschulpolitik – du lernst keine aktivistischen Stimmen kennen. Nur KuWi-Filmstudenten hörst du dauernd. In allen Kursen, mit selbstverliebten Kommentaren.

.

.

zehn:

Ihr sprecht kaum über Geld. Du weißt nicht, wie arm oder reich eure Eltern sind. Oft wirken Männer abgerissen, ungesund, asketisch – doch haben ganz andere finanzielle Polster.

Du hältst dich für normal. Das heißt: Du wohnst allein, in einer großen Dachwohnung – doch hast kein Geld, sie richtig zu beheizen. Du frierst fünf Monate im Jahr, fünf Jahre lang. Du hast ein Auto und musst nie mit öffentlichen Verkehrsmitteln zur Uni – aber kein Geld für Urlaub, Restaurants. Dein Kontostand ist oft bei 20 Euro – doch nie im Minus.

Kommiliton*innen arbeiten u.a. bei Schlecker. Du machst keinen einzigen Job fürs Geld – und darfst fünf Jahre lang nur lesen, schreiben, lernen. Du verachtest jeden, der den Pizzaservice ruft, sich Cocktails oder Häagen-Dasz-Eis leistet – doch rauchst jeden Tag 30 Zigaretten. Deine Mutter zahlt gebrauchte Bücher: Du lässt dir nie eine Bibliothekskarte ausstellen – weil du nur kaufst, oder Karten von Freund*innen benutzt.

Zwei Jahre lebst du ohne Internet, recherchierst nachts im Rechenzentrum. Als dein Vater einen Anschluss legen lässt – du denkst: eine Flatrate –, du Downloads startest und 400 Euro nachzahlen sollst, hilft er dir aus, ohne Klage. Du bist 400 Kilometer weit weg, fast ohne Verpflichtungen. Aber weißt: Du kannst fast immer um Hilfe rufen – und wirst von deiner Familie aufgefangen.

Deine Mutter macht sich Sorgen, weil deine große Wohnung hinter dem Bahnhof liegt, in der Nordstadt. Du bist sicher, der belesenste Mensch der Straße zu sein. #gentrifizierung

.

.

elf:

Egal, was du sagst oder schreibst – du siehst dich im direkten Vergleich mit den vier Männern des Jahrgangs. Neun Frauen haben es schwerer – noch mehr, sobald sie aus der Masse weiblicher KuWis stechen müssen: Jede Frau hier kennt fünf andere, die ihr ähnlich sehen, und jeder Mann und fast jede Frau debattieren, sortieren, werten, ranken diese Frauen ständig gegeneinander – ihr Aussehen, ihre Kompetenz, ihre Stellung an der Uni.

Alex macht eine Performance: Sie zieht sich aus, vor einem leeren Ladenlokal, will dort eine Woche lang nur mit Objekten leben, die ihr Fremde schenken oder leihen. „So will sie auffallen?“, fragen Männer aus dem Studiengang. „Ein alter Mann gab ihr seinen Pulli, damit sie nicht mehr nackt auf der Straße steht.“

Jede Party rekrutiert sich aus kaum 500 potenziellen, immer gleichen Gästen. V kommt enttäuscht nach Hause: „Heute war es eine Wasserloch-Party.“ Du stellst dir eine Savanne vor: Räuber, Beutetiere. „Nein“, sagt sie: „So nennt man Mädchen, die es nötig haben. Wegen dem Männermangel. Sie werden feucht, wenn auch nur EIN Mann kommt: Wasserlöcher.“

2007 bist du mit Q auf Hs Kostümfest. Du weißt nicht, ob du H gefällst. Zwei Frauen, X und Y, bleiben bis zum Schluss. X hat einen Freund, aber flirtet mit dir. Als du nicht darauf eingehst, tauscht sie Küsse mit Y. Q sagt: „Am Ende hätten all drei Frauen mit dir rum gemacht – aus Verzweiflung.“

Kurz darauf sagt Q, sie habe oft Angstzustände und sei einsam. „Ich will nichts von dir. Aber ich würde gern bei dir liegen können, wenn ich Attacken habe. Als Dank können wir auch Sex haben.“

V sagt, bei einer KuWi-Performance lud eine nackte, mit Schokolade beschmierte Studentin alle ein, an ihr zu lecken. V sagt, bei einer Theater-Semesterabschluss-Performance zum Thema Gender hätten sich mit Seifenlauge beschmierte nackte KuWis mit Sekt betrunken, bis es zu Gruppensex auf der Bühne kam. „Prüfer kuckten zu. Und wieder alles nur aus Frustration.“

Anne Köhler schreibt, sie fuhr für Dates mit einem Kommilitonen übers Wochenende nach Hamburg: In Hildesheim wären sie alle drei Meter erkannt, beurteilt worden.

.

.

zwölf:

Eine KuWi ist lange in dich verliebt. Du denkst nur: „Nein – das liegt daran, dass hier kaum Männer sind.“ Zum ersten Mal fühlst du dich wahrgenommen, begehrt, sexuell relevant. Alle Frauen fühlen sich ungeliebt, auswechselbar wie nie.

Viele KuWis tragen Rock über Hose, bunte Tücher im Haar. Frauen, die sich strenger oder femininer kleiden, stehen schnell unter Tussi-Verdacht. Der KuWi-Look ist so eingängig, uniform, dass deine Mutter bis heute, wenn sie Autorinnen, Moderatorinnen beschreibt, oft sagt „Das war keine richtige Frau. Das war halt so ein KuWi-Mädchen.“

Deine Exfreundin hat Besuch von Kommilitonin Simone. „Na? Bist du auch so ein KuWi-Mädchen?“ – „Ich bin Simone. Ich bin eine Frau. Und ich studiere Kulturwissenschaften.“ Simone wird deine beste Freundin. Du sagst nie wieder „KuWi-Mädchen“.

Eine KuWi mit leiernder Stimme stellt verwirrte Fragen. Sie wirkt androgyn und abgemagert: Hat sie eine Essstörung? Du und eine Freundin nennt sie „Gender Bender“.

Ein KuWi trägt einen Nasenring, schwarze Fingernägel und das Glitzerlogo einer Glam-Metal-Band, Cinderella. Du und eine Freundin nennt ihn „Cinderella“.

Es gibt zwei schwarze Frauen im Fachbereich, einen Mann. Bei lesbischen und bisexuellen Frauen spekuliert ihr, ob sie nicht nur „verzweifelt“ sind. Mit der Zeit lernt ihr drei, vier KuWis kennen, die aus einfachen Elternhäusern stammen. Oft gingen sie schon in Hildesheim zur Schule.

Sina finanziert ihr Studium mit Auftritten in Gerichts-Shows auf RTL. Als sie in einem Seminar zu Literaturkritik ihre Mailadresse angibt, rollen alle die Augen und finden sie „absurd“ und „prollig“: 156-cm-purer-sex@web.de

.

.

dreizehn:

Alle haben Angst, verwechselt, übersehen, ersetzt oder übergangen zu werden – in Freundschaften, Beziehungen, Projekten. Wer zögert oder Pflichten nicht übernehmen will, weiß: Es gibt genug genügsamen, motivierten Ersatz. Und weil sich alle ähneln, braucht es wenig, um zu irritieren:

Matthias Karow mag Gedichte von Bastian Winkler. Er gründet einen Verlag, um sie bekannter zu machen. „Nur einem Freund zuliebe?“, fragt ein Gastdozent: Matthias soll sagen, ob er schwul sei. Tatsächlich kennst du in den ersten drei Jahren keinen schwulen Schreiber oder KuWi. („DAS ist jetzt anders!“, lacht eine Freundin, seit 2016 in Hildesheim.)

Alex’ WG feiert eine Party unter dem Motto „Spießer“. Um aufzufallen, herauszustechen, trägst du eine Lederjacke und Kajal. „Warum?“, fragt Cinderella. „Warum nicht: Jetzt sehe ich EINMAL metrosexueller aus als du!“ Er lässt dich stehen, doch nimmt deine Entschuldigung bald an. Du schämst dich bis heute.

Eine Frau schreibt über Sex mit einem älteren, dominanten Mann. Eine andere über eine Schülerin, die auf der Feier einer Freundin beim Tanzen von deren Vater angefasst wird. „Sexueller Missbrauch, autobiografisch?“ – „Stefan: So was passiert jeder von uns mal. Ich wollte das einfach aufschreiben.“ Du selbst schreibst eine plakative, vulgäre, absurde Geschichte über Pädophilie – um zu beweisen, dass du jedes Genre bedienen kannst.

In Woche 2 liest ein Kommilitone einen Text aus Sicht eines unglücklichen Bisexuellen. Du verliebst dich in ihn. Drängst, ob der Text autobiografisch ist. Er weist dich zurück – und für zwei Jahre gehst du auf keine Party.

Jule leitet das Erstsemester-Tutorium, trifft die 10, 15 neuen Schreiber*innen als erste. „Tolle Leute dabei?“, fragst du jedes Jahr. 2004 gibt es nur sieben Neue. 2005 passt keine*r zu dir. In Jahr 3 kommt eine Frau, von der Jule glaubt, du wirst sie mögen. Du stürzt ins nächste Seminar, bist hingerissen… und merkst: Sie stellt wirre Fragen. Wieder nichts! Ein weiteres Jahr Warten – auf Lois-Lane-artige Neue.

.

.

vierzehn:

Du lernst Menschen kennen, hast sie satt – doch weißt: Du siehst sie jetzt noch neun Semester lang in jedem Seminar, Projekt, musst alles mit ihnen abstimmen.

Du hasst, wie viele Texte, Vorschläge von dir Redaktionen und Lektorate passieren müssen, geführt von Leuten, die du seit Monaten oder Jahren meiden willst.

Du weißt: Jedes Jahr kommen etwa 100 neue KuWis, 15 Schreiber*innen. Das ist der Pool. Sonst gibt es niemanden.

.

.

fünfzehn:

Deine Vermieterin ruft an: „Beseitigen Sie das mit Ihrem Auto!“ Jemand türmte 30, 40 gelbe Säcke auf den Polo, über Nacht. Dir fallen 50 Menschen ein, die dich steif, unangenehm genug finden, um darüber zu lachen. Doch kein einziger, der dich so wenig mag, um sich diese Mühe zu machen. Ein Scherz? Berechtigte Aggressionen?

Jule will für Frauenzeitschriften schreiben, und machte ein Praktikum beim Stadtmagzin Prinz. „Na, wenn das kein Kulturjournalismus ist!“, sagt Porombka. Jule hört das als Kompliment. Du denkst, er spottet.

„Es gibt verschiedene Sorten Literaturkritik. Das Feuilleton. Und dann mehr das, was Stefan macht: Brigitte-Journalismus.“ Jule denkt, Porombka scherzt. Du traust dich nicht, zu fragen.

Direkt danach fragt er, wer Radiofeatures zum Thema „Literatur und das Bett“ recherchieren will. „Proust schrieb im Bett.“ Du willst alles lesen, über Pfingsten. Porombka nickt. „Nur heißt der Pruuust, Stefan. Nicht Brauwst.“

Um zu beweisen, dass du keinen „Trash“, „Brigitte-Journalismus“ schreibst, liest du in zehn Tagen 4.200 Seiten Pruuust; und bis zum Herbst 50 Romane für ein Essay über Provinz. „Gut getrickst: Klingt fast, als hättest du das echt gelesen“, sagt Porombka und zwinkert.

.

.

sechzehn:

Du bist stolz, nie mit „strategisch wichtigen“ Menschen gefeiert zu haben. 2005 bietet Ortheil ein Seminar zum Schreiben in Venedig. Du scheiterst nicht am Geld: Du hast keine Lust, Energie, tagelang freundlich-professionell-interessierte Distanz auszustrahlen.

2008 fährt Ortheil mit allen 40 Helfer*innen des Literaturfestivals PROSANOVA auf Sylt. Als einziges Mitglied der Leitung bleibst du in Hildesheim: Du willst, dass Leute mit dir arbeiten, weil sie deinen Ton, deine Texte mögen. Du willst kein Klima, bei dem dein Verhalten auf einer Reise oder an einer Bar entscheiden kann, welche Kompetenzen, Posten dir übertragen werden.

2006 bietet dir Porombka eine Stelle als Hilfskraft an. Du brauchst die Zeit zum Lesen, Schreiben und sagst ab. „Dir ist deine Selbstverwirklichung also wichtiger?“ mailt er – und du hast Angst, ihn vor den Kopf gestoßen zu haben. „Mach sowas nicht!“, klagt deine Mutter. „Du bist von diesen Männern abhängig!“ Das sagte sie schon über alle Lehrer deiner Schulzeit.

Du fürchtest ein paar Monate, dass dich Porombka schneidet oder hängen lässt. Dann merkst du: Nein. Er meint es ernst. Schreiben und Selbstverwirklichung sind wichtiger!

Du leitest ein Tutorium, vergütet als halbe Hiwi-Stelle – doch findest deine Steuernummer nicht und kümmerst dich nicht weiter um die 200 Euro Lohn. Eine Mitarbeiterin schreibt, sie streicht das Geld und sagt Ortheil, dass du ihre Briefe ignorierst. Du denkst: Wer Zeit für Steuernummern nimmt, hat weniger Zeit, der beste Tutor zu sein, der er sein könnte. Ortheil wird das verstehen.

Du glaubst, wer sich ums Geld kümmert, wirkt unfein, gierig. Noch 2010 prahlst du damit, nie nach Stipendien gefragt zu haben – weil du befürchtest, dass dich Kritiker als saturierten Schreibschul-Streber verlachen, der Steuergelder verbraucht. Erst Armutsexperte (und KuWi) Christian Huberts macht dir deine Privilegien klar: 200 Euro in den Wind schießen – das geht, weil deine Eltern halfen. Es ist keine Leistung oder Charakterstärke.

.

.

siebzehn:

Martin schreibt Rezensionen im Netz, bei der „Berliner Literaturkritik“. Um nachzuziehen, aber Martin Raum zu lassen, bewirbst du dich bei „Literaturkritik.de“. Nach zwei Jahren Studium hast du endlich externe Autoritäten, die deine Arbeit schätzen, verbessern.

Davor aber haben 14 Menschen meist die selben wenigen Ziele, wollen auf die gleichen Posten: Wer darf den Grundkurs Kreatives Schreiben leiten? Muss man dafür erst Hiwi werden? Wer wird Tutor*in für neue Jahrgänge? Redakteur*in beim Webmagazin Lit04? Lektor*in der Landpartie-Anthologie? Betreuer*in neuer Buchprojekte?

Du schickst Kurzgeschichten an BELLA triste – eine Zeitschrift für junge Literatur, gegründet von Studierenden, mit denen du nicht zu sprechen wagst, weil sie zwei, drei Jahre länger in Hildesheim sind. 2005 wird Prosa von dir gedruckt. 2006 wirst du Redakteur – doch weil die erste Generation das Ruder an Jüngere übergab, fehlen dir Prestige und Anerkennung: Du glaubst, dass dich „die Älteren“ peinlich finden.

Für Lit04 liest du alle Bücher Vladimir Nabokovs. Porombka sieht die Ausschreibung für eine Konferenz an der Cornell University – und fragt, ob du den Call for Papers beantworten willst. Du weißt nicht, was ein Call for Papers ist. Doch dein Vater zahlt dir das Ticket nach New York, eine Germanistin bietet dir einen Schlafplatz an, der Vortrag glückt: Du sprichst an Nabokovs alter Uni… und merkst, wie viel entspannender, sachlicher du dich außerhalb Hildesheims verhandeln kannst.

.

.

achtzehn:

„Drei von euch können später von Romanen leben“, warnt Ortheil 2003, beim ersten Treffen. Zu lange glaubst du, das heißt: Drei sind gut genug. Tatsächlich haben von 14 mittlerweile erst drei Romane veröffentlicht – doch fast alle sonst Sachbücher oder große Reportagen, Hörspiele, Kinderbücher, Kurzgeschichten, eine eigene TV-Serie.

Wer heute, 14 Jahre später, noch Romane schreiben will, schreibt und veröffentlicht sie: Einige Türen stehen offen. Viele aber nehmen andere Türen – weil sie rentabler sind oder mehr Spaß machen. Du dachtest, Ortheil sagt: 11 Menschen scheitern an Romanen. Doch wer keine Romane schreibt, schreibt mittlerweile fast immer in Formaten, die ihr oder ihm besser liegen.

Im Studium hörst du das „drei von euch“ als „drei sind es wert“, „drei sind vielleicht interessant“, „für drei werde ich mich einsetzen“, „drei interessieren mich“.

Du liebst eine Ortheil-Porombka-Vorlesung im ersten Jahr, „Jetztzeit“. Zwei Stunden im Audimax, schnell wie eine Samstagabendshow, mit Filmszenen, Livemusik und kurzen Präsentationen älterer Studierender. Dein ganzes Studium überlegst du: Was an meiner Arbeit, meinem Ton, meinen Texten ließen beide auf diese Bühne? Was kann ich bieten, das Porombka interessiert? Ortheil?

Porombka, erst 36, verhandelt sich mit euch. Ihr spürt: Euer Feedback hat Gewicht. Er will gehört, verstanden werden. Ortheil spricht im Fernsehen, kennt Politiker, in Lesungen sitzt ein viel älteres Publikum. Welchen Stellenwert hat euer Blick, eure Meinung für ihn?

Du horchst auf, sobald die beiden jemanden bewundern. Porombka mag Flaneure, Spieler, kleine Formen, Ironie. Auch Ortheil legt euch nahe, klein anzufangen – mit Skizzen und Notaten. Weil er Skizzen bewundert? Oder weil er glaubt, für Größeres seid ihr zu kleine Geister?

Du willst ein Seminar zur Popliteratur geben. Ortheil hält es gemeinsam mit dir, 2007. Du bist begeistert über die Freiräume, die er dir lässt – doch hast dauernd Angst, ihn zu langweilen. Du sprichst mit ihm wie mit deinem Vater: Betonst, wie hart du arbeitest. Merkst dir jede Wertung, jedes Urteil. Doch gehst, so schnell du kannst. Du fürchtest bis heute bei vielen Männern dieser Generation: Je besser sie deine Werte, Prioritäten kennen… desto läppischer, alberner finden sie dich.

.

.

neunzehn:

Wie viele Seminare waren von Männern? Wie viele von Frauen?

Alle fünf Psychologiekurse machst du bei der selben ungewürdigten, von Lehrämtler*innen angeblafften Professorin. In Kunst unterrichten dich fünf Männer, eine Frau. Du brauchst keine Mühe, um aufzufallen. Träge Pflichtkurse, die Zeit und Kraft verschlingen.

In Film-Theater-Medien doziert eine grandiose Frau of Color, Mohini Krischke-Ramaswamy, schon 2003 über Fanfiction und lesbische Liebe in „Xena“. Patricia Feise zeigt Grundlagen der Gender Studies am Blick auf „Akte X“ und Seven of Nine. In einem Filmseminar von Corinna Antelmann lernst du an zwei Wochenenden mehr über Spannungsführung als in vier Jahren.

Hans-Otto Hügel ist Professor für Popkultur. In deiner zweiten Woche fragst du nach Pop- und… „…echter Kultur? Wissen Sie, was ich meine?“ – „Kann jemand dem Kommilitonen erklären, dass es ‘E-Kultur’ heißt?“

Erst ärgert dich, wie viel Jargon vorausgesetzt wird: von Lehrkräften, angeheuert, um euch einzuführen. Schnell aber siehst du Seminare scheitern – weil im Poetik-Seminar fast jeder denkt, es ginge um Gedichte. In Film-Seminaren dauernd Leute fragen, ob Filme überhaupt Kultur seien. Immer neue Anfänger*innen alles ausbremsen, mit Grundsatzdiskussionen.

Noch einmal „Sailor Moon“: Weil Klaus Siblewski der einzige Lektor bleibt, der in drei Jahren Kurse gibt, glaubst du, als Lektor müsse man sein wie Klaus Siblewski. Ist Felix Huby der einzige TV-Autor, glaubst du, man müsse sein wie Felix Huby. Beide sind 35 Jahre älter und – in Habitus, Ton, Naturell – entmutigend weit weg von jeder Rolle, die du beruflich füllen könntest.

.

.

zwanzig:

An welchen Stellen entlarvst, disqualifizierst du dich – weil du feine Unterschiede nicht kennst?

2013 sagt S: „Ach, die erste BELLA-Redaktion mit ihrem Tocotronic-Look“ und dir wird klar, dass die Frisuren, Trainingsjacken, Schuhe, Zitate für jeden, der deutschsprachige Musik hört, augenfällig sind. Mit 21 macht dich irre, woher alle Adam Green, David Foster Wallace, n+1 kennen – doch kein Mensch Elke Heidenreich zuhört oder die SZ-Bibliothek liest. Weshalb lieben diese älteren Studierenden Tannenzäpfle-Bier aus dem Schwarzwald – und verachten Energy-Drinks? Menschen in deinem Dorf feiern Senseo-Kaffeepad-Maschinen. Hier zählen Espressokannen auf Gasherden in Altbau-WGs – und jede dritte Kurzgeschichte enthält das Wort „Holunderblütensirup“.

2006 willst du deine Rezensionen auf Amazon zweitveröffentlichen. Porombka glaubt, du verkaufst dich unter Wert. Alle sind geschockt, dass du auf die Idee kamst. 2012, beim Literaturwettbewerb Open Mike, liest du aus deinem Roman – und brennst Daten-CDs mit den ersten 100 Seiten, falls Zuhörer*innen mehr wollen. „Du demontierst dich!“, warnt Vea Kaiser. Sie findet, du machst dich und dein Buch lächerlich.

Über TV-Serien spricht niemand am Institut. Dann zeigt Porombka eine Szene aus „Der Bachelor“: Reality-TV ist diskutabel? Im zweiten Semester siehst du einen „Spider-Man“-Sammelband in seinem Regal. Du achtest genau, wer was erwähnt oder lobt: Sind also auch Comics hier erlaubt, salonfähig?

2017 fotografiert sich Porombka in Stützstrümpfen, Unterwäsche – als Bildwitz für die ZEIT. Du merkst, dass du bis heute mental Buch führst: Was er tut, zeigt, was Journalist*innen gerade tun dürfen – ohne, dass Verlage, Redaktionen Achtung verlieren. Je sorgloser, spielerischer Porombka im Netz agiert, desto sicherer darfst du sein, dass dich der Betrieb nicht plötzlich ausspuckt.

2004 kommt die Schriftstellerin, Journalistin Annett Gröschner ans Institut, lehrt über Literatur und Arbeitswelt. Sie ist kompetent, humorvoll – doch trumpft irritierend wenig auf. Gegen Abend ihres ersten Blockseminars (zu Sachbüchern) fragt sie in die Runde, ob jemand Buletten will. „Ortheil, Porombka würden kein Essen anbieten. Oder nur extravagante Snacks. Auf keinen Fall selbst gemachte Buletten: Annett versteht nicht, was hier läuft“, denkst du.

Ab 2009 postet KuWi Merlin verbitterte Links zur Hochschulpolitik: Dir ist nicht klar, wer Carsten Maschmeyer ist. Warum Dozierende nach Jahren gehen müssen – obwohl sie dringend bleiben wollen. Merlin sieht die Uni als fragwürdigen, drittklassigen Sumpf, voll schlecht versteckter Klüngelei.

.

.

einundzwanzig:

Fast alle Männer, mit denen du studiert hast, arbeiten heute im Kulturbetrieb oder sichereren, lukrativen Branchen: Bildung, Werbung. Viele Frauen brachen das Studium ab.

Den längsten Atem haben oft Männer, die durch die Schreiber-Prüfung fielen, als KuWi ein Jahr alle Seminare besuchen, im zweiten Versuch bestehen. 2005, in einer Rauchpause, sagt KuWi Leif Randt, er schaut oft „Samt & Seide“ mit seiner Mutter: eine ZDF-Soap, mit der niemand kulturell punkten kann. Du fragst dich ernsthaft, ob er wegen solcher arglosen Sätze abgelehnt wird.

2008 planst du PROSANOVA, Tag und Nacht – doch eine Stunde pro Woche triffst du deine echten Freund*innen. Ihr schaut „Desperate Housewives“. Je läppischer, alberner die anderen Festivalleiter*innen das finden, desto trotziger, glücklicher sitzt du in der WG, vor dieser Soap.

In einem öffentlichen Poetiktext nennt Lyrikerin Ann Cotten die PROSANOVA-Leitung „Hildesheimer Bubi-Mafia“. Ihr seid vier Männer, zwei Frauen – und dich freut, dass sie den Player-, Poser-, Mauscheltonfall deiner Kollegen nicht ernst nehmen will.

Martin Kordic mag Milena Bodrozic und Sasa Stanisic. Als du Jagoda Marinic zu PROSANOVA holen willst, ist er auf deiner Seite. Dir scheint das etwas billig: Frauen unterstützen demonstrativ Frauen? Ostdeutsche fragen nach Ostdeutschen? Herr -ic will Texte von -ic-Autor*innen? Seilschaften oder Bonuspunkte für biografische Gemeinsamkeiten?

Später lernst du, umgekehrt zu fragen: Warum sucht niemand außer Martin Kordic südeuropäische Stimmen? Warum kennen Heterofrauen im Literaturbetrieb kaum aktuelle lesbische Autorinnen? Welche Journalisten auf Twitter empfehlen Texte von Menschen mit anderem Geschlecht, anderer Hautfarbe? Lobt ein Autor, der selbst vor allem von älteren Frauen bewundert, gekauft, gehört wird, vor allem andere Männer? Du hast den größten Respekt vor Multiplikator*innen, die sich für Menschen außerhalb ihrer In-Group interessieren und stark machen.

.

.

zweiundzwanzig:

Jule liebt Praktika. Sie kann sich eine größere Bandbreite an Jobs vorstellen als alle anderen. Auch Ortheil ist beeindruckt. Er schreibt schon 2005, Jule wird „irgendwann mühelos über den Fluss gehüpft“ sein und ihm „von der anderen Seite aus zuwinken“.

Im Studium hast du Angst vor diesem Fluss: Hast du die Kraft, zu hüpfen? Brauchst du Ortheils Hilfe, um Redaktionen und Jobs zu finden? Dich macht stolz, ihn in fünf Jahren nur einmal direkt um eine Gefälligkeit gebeten zu haben: ein Empfehlungsschreiben für ein Praktikum am Goethe-Institut. Du hast zu kurzfristig gefragt. Er hatte keine Zeit. Das Institut will dich trotzdem.

Herausgeberschaften, Redaktionen, HiWi-Stellen, Tutorien, Lehraufträge, später Promotionen: Einige von euch werden ermutigt, eingeladen, angefragt. Andere suchen Nischen: Sie machen Radio, finden Anschluss bei Theater-, Film-, Medien-KuWis, profilieren sich außerhalb des Instituts, geben das Wettrennen auf.

Vielen Menschen im Studiengang, die sich in Porombka oder Ortheil kaum erkennen, zeigt Annett Gröschner einen dritten Weg: Sie wird Role Model. Dir selbst liegt Porombkas Witz, Schwung, Netz-Euphorie. Wie toll Annett ist, merkst du, als du ihre Texte liest. In persona bleiben die Männer im Mittelpunkt.

2017 erscheint „Es ist Liebe“ – ein Traktat, in dem Porombka Ton, Formen, Arbeitsweisen der Romantik mit neuen Formen von Dialog und Intimität im Netz vergleicht: Tinder, Snapchat, Instagram. „Er schreibt jetzt nicht mehr so extrem“, lobt deine Mutter. „In Hildesheim wolltet ihr immer aus dem Rahmen fallen, schockieren. Jetzt höre ich euch lieber.“ Sie liest das Buch zweimal.

Alle Freundschaften werden leichter, seit ihr nicht dauernd neben-, gegeneinander schreiben, sprechen, wirken müsst. Du hast keinen Spaß an deinem Text über eine Hildesheimer Bushaltestelle – erdrückt, überstrahlt, verwechselbar mit 40 ähnlichen Texten ähnlicher, verwechselbarer Menschen, alle begraben im selben Buch.

.

.

dreiundzwanzig:

Ortheil hat keinen Blog und nutzt kein Twitter, Facebook. Auch Vea Kaiser, 28, sagt 2016 ihren Followern, dass sie jetzt online kürzer tritt. All deine Jobs, Einladungen, Engagements, Kontakte ergaben sich, weil Literaturvermittler*innen dich im Netz lasen, hörten. Dass Kaiser und Ortheil es sich leisten können, diese Kanäle zu ignorieren, zeigt dir: Es gibt noch einen zweiten, analogen Literaturbetrieb – in dem man dich nicht kennt? Wie kommst du rein?

2014 schreibt Florian Kessler, aus Hildesheim und Leipzig schaffen vor allem „Absolventen mit den hochrangigsten bundesrepublikanischen Eltern“ den Sprung in Buchhandlungen, Redaktionen, Professuren: Arztsöhne, Professorentöchter, „ein Managersohn wie Leif Randt“.

„Aber Leif schaut ‘Samt und Seide’! Er läuft rum wie ein Skater“, protestierst du: „Sein Habitus war so… Suhrkamp-fremd, dass er es auf der Uni schwerer hatte als viele!“ 2003 beschworen alle das literarische „Fräuleinwunder“: Hast du das falsche Geschlecht? Dann starb die Popliteratur: Bist du zu jung? Dann warf man Schreibschulen vor, Texte seien weltfremd, klinisch: Stellt dich deine Studienwahl ins Aus? Und jetzt watscht Florian Leute ab, weil sie reiche Eltern haben? Eure Eltern kamen im Studium nie zur Sprache!

Du brauchst lange, um zu verstehen, auf wen Florians Text befreiend wirkt. Welche Debatten er anstößt – und, dass es nie darum ging, Menschen für ihre Eltern zu strafen. „Leider stimmt in der Polemik unseres geliebten Flo Kessler, den Hildesheim aufgezogen, genährt und gepäppelt hat (bis es ihm zuviel werden musste und er das Zuviel ausgekotzt hat) kaum etwas“, schreibt Ortheil in einem Text zu PROSANOVA 2014 – ohne weiter ins Detail zu gehen.

Statt dir Verbündete, Mentor*innen, Plattformen, Publikum zu suchen, glaubst du von 2003 bis 2008, vor allem abwägen zu müssen, was du zwei einzelnen Professoren zeigen, bieten kannst. Und, wie du auffällst – ohne, dich lächerlich zu machen. Kommuniziert hast du dabei möglichst wenig: Meist war Ortheils Hilfskraft Kai für dich Botschafter, Mittler, Orakel.

Heute – mit Facebook, Blogs, digitalen Orten für Erstkontakt und Dialog – sprichst du viel freier, bringst dich schneller ein: Du kannst alle Texte jeder denkbaren Redaktion anbieten. Hast neue, diversere Kontakte, die notfalls gern vermitteln. Porombka und Ortheil waren gute Professoren. Doch sie waren auch – strukturell – ein Nadelöhr, ein Hegemon, der einzige Fokus. Die Stadt war viel zu klein. Dein Blick zu eng.

Bei PROSANOVA 2017 öffnest du Planetromeo und Grindr. Wie viele queere Männer sitzen mittlerweile hier, in Lesungen? Der Studiengang wirkt bunter, selbstbewusster. Doch die Apps zeigen einen einzigen queeren User: Leif-Randt-Käppi, weit über 30. Nach zwei Tagen wird dir klar: Das war kein Hildesheimer. Sondern der Regisseur eines feministischen Theaterstücks – fürs Festival aus Berlin angereist.

Unnötig wenige Stimmen. Gesichter. Optionen. Hildesheim, das war für dich zu lange: Mangel.

.

Ich habe in Hildesheim übers Schreiben nichts gelernt. Was in Hildesheim funktioniert, ist sich für einen überschaubaren, also erträglichen Zeitraum Zuständen auszusetzen, modellmäßig und auf Probe, die so ein zukünftiges Autorenleben fingieren, und eine Ahnung dazu zu entwickeln, ob man das aushält“, schreibt Maren Kames.

„Ich weiß, man hört es nicht gern, aber auch an der wunderschönen Uni Hildesheim im superkuscheligen Fachbereich Kulturwissenschaften habe ich Rassismus-Erfahrungen gemacht. Ansonsten hatte ich genau die gleichen Probleme, die wir alle hatten: zu viele Fächer, zu wenig Zeit, zu viel Bürokratie“, schreibt Simone Dede Ayivi.

„Immer wieder klagt jemand, KuWi Hildesheim müsste eigentlich an eine Fachhochschule: Wissenschaftlich nicht auf dem Niveau einer Universität, künstlerisch nicht auf dem einer Kunsthochschule“, schreibt T. – der in Hildesheim promovierte.

.

George R.R. Martin, J.K. Rowling, Stephen King – Autor*innen streiten und antworten, online

.

Für Deutschlandfunk Kultur las ich den Blog / das Livejournal von George R.R. Martin – alle Einträge seit 2005:

  • ich notierte mir alle Buch- und Filmtipps, die Martin in den letzten 13 Jahren gab
  • ich notierte alles über seine Schreibweisen, Arbeitsweisen und Poetik
  • (wahrscheinlich werde ich beides später nochmal irgendwo sammeln/bloggen, als Linkliste)

.

Morgen, 13. Juli, gegen 10.20 Uhr, bin ich Studiogast bei Deutschlandunk Kultur und spreche über Martin… und andere Autor*innen, die bloggen, an Debatten teilnehmen, über ihren Schreibprozess berichten, sich gesellschaftlich einmischen oder ihre Werke durch Tweets etc. erklären.

Vor jeder Deutschlandfunk-Sendung schicke ich meine Stichpunkte und Thesen an die Redaktion: Hintergrund-Infos und Links, aus denen Moderator*innen dann ihre Fragen fürs Livegespräch erarbeiten. Hier kurz gebloggt: meine Fundstücke und Links zur morgigen Sendung.

.

  • Es gab schon immer Sekundärliteratur zu Büchern (und Serien).
  • Besonders seit dem Internet sind diese Texte, Wortmeldungen zweiter Ordnung immer öffentlicher, leichter zu finden.
  • George R.R. Martin scheint, besonders seit 2014, oft mehr zu bloggen, als an neuen Romanen zu arbeiten.
  • Ich selbst bin Fan seines Blogs und den Artikeln ÜBER seine Bücher (…und die TV-Verfilmung).
  • Wichtig: die Serie selbst und die Romane habe ich nicht durch: Ich liebe es, die Sekundärtexte, Kritiken, Debatten drumherum zu lesen.

.

zu Martin selbst:

  • Er ist fast 70 (geboren 1948 in New Jersey) und lebt in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Zum zweiten Mal verheiratet, keine Kinder.
  • Er schrieb Science-Fiction-Kurzgeschichten, Novellen und Romane; manchmal Horror, und seit 1987 eine Surperhelden-Reihe namens “Wild Cards” (fast 30 Sammelbände aus mehreren Perspektiven, verfasst von mehreren Autor*innen, Martin ist auch Herausgeber/Editor der Reihe).
  • Sein Hauptwerk, “Das Lied von Eis und Feuer”, läuft seit 1996.
  • Es sollte ursprünglich eine Trilogie werden, ist jetzt aber auf sieben Bände angelegt.
  • Bisher erschienen fünf Bände, alle auch in Deutsch (dort meist zweigeteilt): 96, 99, 2000, 2005, 2011.
    .
  • Seit 2011 läuft eine Verfilmung auf HBO, “Game of Thrones”. Sie ist auf acht Staffeln angelegt, Staffel 7 startet am 16. Juli (auf Englisch) und am 17. Juli (auf Deutsch).
  • Letztes Jahr hat die Serie die Bücher überholt: Die Geschichte wird ERST als TV-Verfilmung zu Ende erzählt. Martin selbst gibt viel Input. Die Serie endet 2018. Doch Roman 6 von 7, “The Winds of Winter”, erscheint frühestens 2018.das ist für alle Beteiligten etwas unglücklich, und Martin selbst wird oft belächelt: Warum schreibt er so langsam? Warum macht er so viele andere Projekte? [Ich selbst schreibe seit 2009 an meinem Roman, und einmal pro Woche will jemand mit mir über Martin reden, den anderen “zu langsamen” und “immer abgelenkten” Autor, den alle kennen.]

.

Autor*innen reden mit?

  • 1992 starte die Science-Fiction-Serie “Babylon 5”. Verträge für Schauspieler*innen dürfen maximal sechs Jahre gelten. Deshalb wissen Serienmacher*innen: Alles läuft etwa sechs Jahre lang, dann wird es teuer und kompliziert, wegen neuer Vertragsverhandlungen. “Babylon 5” war eine der allerersten Serien mit einem im Vorfeld über alle Staffeln geplanten Spannungsbogen: Beeinflusst von u.a. “Herr der Ringe” erzählt die Serie von einer Raumstation, die in einen großen Krieg verwickelt wird.
  • Der Macher, J. Michael Straczynski, plante 5 Staffeln, schrieb fast alle Drehbücher zur Serie selbst und konnte trotz ein paar Schauspielerwechseln und Produktionsproblemen EINE große Geschichte erzählen. Zuvor erzählte TV meist episodisch: Jede Folge ist möglichst einsteigerfreundlich, wenig verändert sich, notfalls kann man Folgen auch in falscher Reihenfolge sehen. “Babylon 5” hat eine Fünf-Akt-Struktur und erzählt wie ein Roman: Ständig wird betont, dass jetzt ALLES anders ist und sich Dinge grundlegend verändert haben. Das ist ein starker Kontrast zu “Star Trek”, wo sich jahrzehntelang möglichst wenig ändern sollte.
  • Straczynski benutzte Fan-Foren im Internet, um jede Woche Fragen zu beantworten über seine Vision, seine Pläne und seinen Arbeitsprozess. Diese Chats sind online gesammelt, und für viele Menschen ist es normal, erst eine Folge der Serie zu sehen… und dann die gesammelten “JMS speaks”-Zitate zu lesen.

.

.

  • Websites wie “Television without Pity” wurden irrsinnig erfolgreich, indem sie – zu einer Zeit, als Episoden noch nicht direkt als Raubkopie online zu sehen waren – jede Folge vieler laufender Serien ausführlich nacherzählten.
  • In Deutschland erzählen vor allem Welt.de/Axel Springer jeden “Tatort” und jeden größeren Polit-Talk (Anne Will etc.) nach: Diese Texte sind sehr erfolgreich.
  • Nach Footballspielen gibt es “Post-Game”-Rederunden. immer mehr Menschen wünschen sich solche Nachbesprechungen, nachdem sie eine Episode einer Serie gesehen zu haben.
  • Serien wie “The Walking Dead” gingen darauf ein und senden tatsächlich nach jeder neuen Folge eine Talkshow/Gesprächsrunde, “The Talking Dead”. “Game of Thrones” hat seit 2016 “After the Thrones”; ich mag auch die kurzen “Rebels: Recon”-Making-of-Videos zu “Star Wars: Rebels”

.

  • 2012 startete “Girls”, eine Serie über vier widersprüchliche junge Frauen in New York.
  • Die New York Times schrieb ca. 40 Artikel über “Girls”, in sechs Jahren; weil viele Themen der Serie relevant für NYT-Leser*innen sind: Gentrifizierung, Gender, Lokalpolitik, Generationenfragen (Hipster, Millennials)
  • Solche Texte, die immer MIT der Serie einstiegen, aber dann oft sehr persönlich werden und über strittige gesellschaftliche Themen sprechen, heißen “Think Pieces”. Seit “Girls” gibt es nach provokanten Momenten in Serien dauernd neue “Think Pieces”.

.

bei Martin und “Game of Thrones” kommt all das zusammen:

  • “Game of Thrones” zeigt viel sexuelle Gewalt und “starke” Frauen, denen Furchtbares passiert. Dreimal im Jahr erscheinen 20 Artikel über eine besonders brutale oder ambivalente “Game of Thrones”-Szene: War das “schlechter Sex” – oder Vergewaltigung? Wird eine Frau erniedrigt, und agiert fünf Folgen später als besonders kalte oder starke Kämpferin: Heißt das, der Missbrauch und das Trauma machten die Frau “stärker”?
  • Oft variieren solche Szenen im Buch und in der Serie: War es in Martins Text ruppiger Sex – oder Vergewaltigung? Ist die Serie brutaler? Ist sie, durch diese Brutalität, autormatisch frauenfeindlicher?
  • Geht es “Game of Thrones” darum, Gewalt gegen Frauen, Sexismus, Zwänge im Feudalismus, Intoleranz etc. möglichst drastisch auszustellen, zu verurteilen? Oder ist da immer ein gewisser Sexploitation-Kitzel? etc.
  • Nicht nur bei Sex- und Gender-Fragen öffnet “Game of Thrones” oft Debatten, die WEIT über die Serie selbst hinaus gehen.
  • Allergrößte Zeitungen schreiben nach Einzelepisoden lange Texte darüber, was “Game of Thrones” z.B. über den Klimawandel, das Bankenwesen oder Kolonialismus im nahen Osten erzählt.
  • (schade dagegen: Auch in großen deutschen Zeitungen erzählen manchmal nur Fanboys nach, was sie an der jeweiligen Folge “krass” oder “witzig” fanden. Das bleibt oft unreflektiertes, dünnes Clickbait-Gerede, und dem Feuilleton nicht würdig.)

.

für Wortmeldungen von Autor*innen selbst gibt es den Ausdruck “Word of God”:

  • Fragen, die das Werk selbst nicht eindeutig beantwortet, werden manchmal vom Autor beantwortet.
  • Eins der bekanntesten Beispiele: J.K. Rowling, die nach dem Ende von “Harry Potter” sagt, Zauber-Rektor Dumbledore sei schwul sei. In den Büchern selbst kommt das nicht vor.
  • Rowling hat seit 2007 – vor allem auf Twitter, in Interviews und in sehr, sehr langen und detaillierten Fußnoten auf der Website “Pottermore” immer wieder offene Fragen beantwortet, Ambivalenzen ausgemerzt, Ideen konkretisiert. Oft ging das Fans auf die Nerven.
    .
  • Martin ist recht zurückhaltend mit solchen “Words of God”; und lügt auch immer wieder, um Wendungen/Geheimnisse nicht im Voraus zu verderben.
  • Trotzdem ist all das mittlerweile ein großer, zweiter Raum, der sich um jedes Buch und jede Serien-Episode öffnet: Fans legen Wikis an, um “Words of God” zu sammeln, TV-Schöpfer*innen livetweeten während der Erstausstrahlung wichtiger Episoden, die New York Times macht oft Interviews mit Darsteller*innen von Serien, am Morgen, nachdem ihre Figuren überraschend ausstiegen oder starben: “Wie geht es Ihnen jetzt? Und warum wurde Ihre Rolle vergewaltigt?” etc.

.

.

John Fiske, mein Lieblings-Popkulturforscher, sagt, Dinge werden populär, wenn sie widersprüchlich bleiben, verschiedene Lesarten zulassen, nicht alle Fragen beantworten.

  • Der Witz an all den Sekundärtexten, Wortmeldungen ist, dass es immer SCHEINT, als gäbe es gleich große, gültige Antworten: Ist Figur X “böse”? Ist Y eine Metapher für Donald Trump? etc. Doch obwohl Autor*innen und Serienmacher*innen heute viel MEHR reden, verstärken ihre Drumherumtexte eher noch die Fragen und Widersprüche: Fans reiben sich produktiv an offenen Fragen. Größte Zeitungen debattieren z.B. ob die Ehefrau aus “Breaking Bad” nervt – oder als Sympathieträgerin verstanden werden soll.
    .
  • In Deutschland gibt es den Geniemythos: Als Autor über die eigenen Intentionen und das Handwerk zu sprechen, gilt oft als unnötig, verpönt. Martin kommt aus der Science-Fiction-Ecke, und war als Kind Fan von Sci-Fi-Groschenheften und Superheldencomics. Die Szene organisiert sich in Conventions: Fans treffen auf Macher*innen, alle bleiben in Dialog. Martin selbst schrieb Leserbriefe, die in Marvel-Comics gedruckt wurden, und fand Freunde/Anschluss, als andere Fans auf seine Briefe antworteten. Die Treffen/Conventions sind bis heute wichtig für die – gut vernetzte – Phantastik-Szene, und Martin besucht immer noch mehrere Cons im Jahr. Er schrieb als Teenager Amateurtexte – aber mit eigenen Figuren. Heute wünscht er sich, dass Fans ihre eigenen Erzählwelten bauen, statt mit vorhandenen Figuren (z.B. “Harry Potter”) neue Fanfiction-Texte zu schreiben.
    .
  • Es gibt einige sehr aktive, gut vernetzte Bestseller-Autor*innen in der Phantastik, bei denen die Grenze zwischen Star und Fan verwischt (weil sie selbst Fans sind und über ihr Fan-Sein sprechen)… und die in Blogs oder auf Twitter sehr viel über ihre Arbeit und ihre Begeisterung für andere Autor*innen sprechen:
    .
  • Neil Gaiman
  • Patrick Rothfuss
  • Cory Doctorow
  • Stephen King (der SEHR viel liest und oft großartige Buch-, Film-, Serientipps gibt)
  • manchmal JK Rowling (poltisch, besonders auf Twitter)
  • die Comic-Autorin Gail Simone
  • … und eben Martin (der nichts auf Twitter und Facebook schreibt, aber seinen Blog pflegt)
    .
  • Lyriker*innen können oft kluge Dinge über ihre Kolleg*innen sagen – weil Gedichte so kurz sind, dass jeder alle Gesamtwerke der anderen kennt. Deutsche Autor*innen sagen oft nichts Kluges über ihre Kolleg*innen – weil niemand sich die Zeit nimmt, viel zu lesen. Obwohl Fantasy-Bücher sehr dick sind, merkt man: Martin u.a. nehmen sich extrem viel Zeit, nach rechts und links zu schauen: Eine Szene, die sich für sich selbst interessiert, und relativ offen/einladend ist.

.

mein Fazit?

  • In den 90ern warteten alle auf Hypertexte, interaktive Literatur, nicht-lineares Erzählen.
  • Das Tolle an “Words of God” und den vielen neuen Debatten-Texten ist, dass es dem nahe kommt. Es gibt die Haupterzählung, die alle Fans verfolgen: das Buch, die Serie. Und es gibt die Ausläufer, das Bonusmaterial, die Debatten drumherum: Alle können so viel oder wenig davon lesen, wie sie wollen. Man kann Dinge entdecken, und selbst mitreden.
  • Die TV-Autorin Shonda Rhimes (“Grey’s Anatomy”, “Scandal”, “How to get away with Murder”) bloggt viel über ihre Arbeit… und gesellschaftliche, politische Fragen: Ich sehe ihre Serien nicht. Aber ich bin süchtig danach, über ihren Arbeitsprozess und ihre politischen Anliegen zu lesen: Manchmal ist die Geschichte, wie und warum etwas von der Autorin gemacht wird, viel interessanter, als das, WAS gemacht wird.
    .
  • Die Romane von Martin machen wir wenig Spaß – er hält sich zu viel Heraldik/Wappen/höfischen Ritualen auf.
  • Die Serie sehe ich nicht gerne, weil sie oft fast nur “wie gewonnen, so zerronnen”- und “so schnell kanns gehen!”-Momente aneinander reiht: Figuren geben sich Mühe… und sterben/scheitern dann sang- und klanglos. Das soll tiefgründig, existenziell, nihilistisch wirken… doch oft kommt es mir einfach trost- und pointenlos vor.

.

10 Gründe für – und gegen! – Goodreads

beim Literaturfestival Sprachsalz, Mai 2016. Foto: Denis Mörgenthaler

.

Am 21. Juni bin ich Studiogast bei Deutschlandfunk Kultur – und erkläre, wie ich auf Leseplattformen neue und vergessene Bücher finde.

.

Mir hilft “Social Cataloging”: Websites, auf denen ich eingebe, was ich las, sah, hörte… oder bald lesen, sehen, hören will.

.

Mein Essay “Futter für die Bestie: 528 Wege zum nächsten guten Buch” (BELLA triste, Link hier) gewann 2012 den Friedrich-Oppenberg-Förderpreis der Stiftung Lesen.  Auf ZEIT Online schrieb ich über Goodreads, zuletzt 2013 (Link). Im Techniktagebuch: ein kurzer Text übers Liken und Herzchen-Vergeben in solchen Netzwerken.

.

Als Literaturkritiker ist Goodreads mein wichtigstes Werkzeug.

.

zehn Gründe für  – und gegen – die Plattform:

.

10. Mein Leben als Leser – öffentlich sichtbar?

.

.

Ich fand Goodreads im Juni 2008; bei einem Praktikum im Lektorat von Klett-Cotta: Ich las aktuelle britische und US-Titel und prüfte, ob sie in den Verlag passen. Oft war Goodreads die einzige Site, auf der über diese Bücher klug gesprochen wurde:kurze Kritiken – und der User-Score zwischen einem und fünf Sternen.

Knapp eine Woche überlegte ich: Was habe ich bisher gelesen? Will ich meine Lektüren mit Sternen bewerten? Ich legte ein Profil – und damit: eine öffentliche “Bibliothek” – an, ich verschlagwortete Bücher als “Deutsch, modern”, “Deutsch, Klassiker”, “international modern”, “international Klassiker”, “Genre oder Sachbuch”, “Graphic Novel” und fand ca. 2000 Lektüren, an die ich mich erinnern konnte, in der Datenbank: meine Lese-Biografie, öffentlich im Netz.

Ich bin froh, dass ich das 2008 tat: mit 25. Viele Details hätte ich mittlerweile vergessen.

  • Entscheidet, wer eure Buchsammlung sehen sollte. Alle? Nur Goodreads-Freund*innen?
  • Entscheidet, ob ihr knapp zeigen wollt, was ihr aktuell lest… oder eure komplette Lesebiografie einpflegt.
  • Entscheidet, wie ihr Bücher auf ein oder mehrere virtuelle “Regale” sortiert: “abgebrochen”? “will ich lesen”? “Lieblingsbuch”? etc.

.

ein Problem: Vieles fand ich mit 8, 12, 15 umwerfend. Soll das gleichberechtigt neben aktuellen Büchern stehen? Vergebe ich 5 Sterne, weil das GUT war? Oder nur, weil es mich damals glücklich machte?

.

09. Meinung – auf eine Zahl von 1 bis 5 reduziert:

,

.

Freund*innen sind oft verwirrt und müde, wenn ich sie bitte, komplexe Meinungen zu einem Buch auf eine Skala von 1 bis 5 zu reduzieren. Doch das ist Übungssache – und macht oft Spaß. Meine Vermutung: Wer online über Bücher ins Gespräch kommen will, sucht im Jahr 2017 gar keine Leseplattformen mehr – sondern kennt fast alle. Je nach Interesse, Zeit, Stimmung, Zielgruppe, Charakter kann ich…

  • Blogs führen (und meine Rezensionen auf Amazon, Goodreads, Lovelybooks etc. kopieren).
  • Lektüren für Instagram fotografieren, Hashtags vergeben, in Hashtags wie “Essay” Neues entdecken.
  • Amazon-Wunschzettel anlegen.
  • auf Plattformen wie Literaturschock, Lovelybooks in “Leserunden” gemeinsam mit Fans & Autoren über ein Buch diskutieren.
  • auf Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr Diskussionen eröffnen, mit Freunden oder Fremden.

Bücher auf einer 5-Sterne-Skala zu werten… das ersetzt keine Literaturkritik oder Dialog. Doch es hilft, sich Vorlieben bewusst zu machen. Lese ich zu viele 3-/2-Sterne-Titel in Folge, denke ich z.B. schnell, Lesen per se mache mir gerade keinen Spaß mehr. Goodreads macht die eigenen Gewohnheiten, Ansprüche, Mechanismen sichtbar(er).

.

ein Problem: Goodreads will helfen, indem jedem Stern eine Phrase zugeschrieben wird. “I did not like it” (1), “It was okay” (2), “I liked it” (3), “I really liked it” (4), “It was amazing” (5 Sterne). Meine eigene Skala: “unfähig oder böse: Ich wünschte, niemand läse dieses Buch” (1), “misslungen: Ich rate ab” (2), “nicht misslungen – doch mit größeren Problemen/Schwächen” (3), “gern gelesen, viele Stärken” (4), “umwerfend, besonders, aufregend!” (5 Sterne).

.

08. der User-Score: 401 Abstufungen

.

.

Fünf Sterne? Das klingt undifferenziert. Doch zu jedem Buch wird der Durchschnittswert öffentlich gezeigt, bis zur zweiten Kommastelle. Nur die schlechtesten oder umstrittensten Bücher haben einen Score unter 3.00 (“Feuchtgebiete”: 2.80, “Deutschland schafft sich ab”: 3.35), und nur Bücher mit besonders euphorischen Fans (z.B. Kinder und Jugendliche) kommen über 4.5 (“Harry Potter”, Band 1: 4.44).

Lovelybooks, der deutschsprachige Konkurrent zu Goodreads, zeigt den Score nur als Grafik: Fast jedes Buch hat rund 4 Sterne. Damit ist die Plattform für mich nutzlos – denn ich brauche die genaue Zahl. Und etwas Erfahrung, wie ich sie lesen/verstehen kann:

  • Romane: ab 3.75 lesenswert; ab 4.00 auffällig beliebt
  • Superheldencomics: ab 3.75 lesenswert; ab 4.00 auffällig beliebt
  • Fantasy und Science Fiction: erst ab 4.00 einen Blick wert, oft seltsame Hypes
  • Jugendbücher: ab 3.90 einen Blick wert; ab 4.20 oft krasser Mainstream/Romance.
  • Theaterstücke, Essays, Kurzgeschichtensammlungen: ab 3.90 einen Blick wert

Schullektüren werden schlechter bewertet – weil viele sie unfreiwillig lesen, und sich darüber ärgern. Bildbände haben hohe Wertungen: Weil viele Geld ausgeben? Stolz sind? Sich den Kauf schön reden? Je schwerer, trockener, anspruchsvoller, desto höher der Score: Vielleicht sind die meisten Leser*innen stolz, sich durch ein Buch gekämpft zu haben. Wichtig: Je größer das Fandom, die Nische, je leidenschaftlicher die Subkultur – desto größer die Hype-Gefahr; Bücher von/für Mormonen sowie Liebes-Groschenromane und Erotik haben oft unkritisch hohe Wertungen. Bücher aus den Niederlanden werden dagegen meist absurd schlecht bewertet: Das niederländische Heimatpublikum fühlt sich von ihren Literat*innen genervter als wir Deutschen von unseren.

ein Problem: Der “Ikea”-Effekt zeigt: Wer viel Arbeit investiert, ist stolzer als jemand, der es leichter hat. Vielleicht werden deshalb zähe, mühsame, trockene Bücher oft höher bewertet. Je mehr man denken, mitarbeiten, die Zähne zusammenbeißen muss, desto höher oft der Score. Eine gute Nachricht, eigentlich: Ein breites Publikum bereut die meisten “schwierigen” Lektüren nicht. Im Gegenteil!

.

07. Anlesen, bald lesen, für später merken:

.

.

Bücher können als “gelesen”, “lese ich gerade”, “will ich lesen” markiert werden. Meine Routine, seit Jahren: Sobald jemand ein Buch erwähnt oder empfiehlt, öffne ich Goodreads, markiere es. Gibt es eine deutsche oder englische Leseprobe, lese ich rein. Ich entscheide, ob ich das Buch interessant finde, selbst lesen würde. Um dieses Anlesen und Bald-Lesen zu organisieren, habe ich einen Zweit-Account:

  • Bei 6.600 Büchern suche ich eine Leseprobe, warte auf die Übersetzung oder die Buchpremiere.
  • 13.000 Bücher wurden von mir angelesen
  • 2.7000 Bücher von mir als “angelesen und gemocht” markiert: Ich lege sie auf meine Amazon-/Medimops-/Rebuy-Wunschzettel, blogge über sie, habe sie oft billig gebraucht gekauft und noch ungelesen im Regal stehen.
  • Hier, im Zweit-Account, nutze ich präzisere Verschlagwortungen und sortiere auf mehr Regale: “zweiter Weltkrieg”, “Bücher mit Illustrationen”, “Bücher für Neun- bis Vierzehnjährige”, “in Deutschland erschienen, doch gerade nicht im Buchhandel erhältlich” etc.
  • Sucht jemand Bücher für Teenager, die von Essen handeln, internationale Comics, die in Japan spielen etc., kann ich in zehn Minuten erste Listen erstellen.
  • Ich bin oft stundenlang in Bibliotheken, Buchhandlungen, Antiquariaten oder vor Regalen von Freund*innen. Ich blättere durch Bücher und markiere, was mich packt/interessiert – und was mich kalt lässt.

.

ein Problem: Um schnell zu sehen, welchen Eindruck solche angelesen Bücher auf mich machten, gebe ich den vielversprechenden 4 Sterne, den abstoßenden 2, und allem, das ich nicht unbedingt lesen will, 3. Weil alle Sterne öffentlich sind, beeinflusse ich damit Scores – ohne, das Buch zu Ende gelesen zu haben. Verboten ist das nicht. Doch besonders bei aktuellen deutschen Titeln, die noch kaum bewertet wurden, gebe ich manchmal keine Wertung ab: Statt – anonym, und ohne, komplett gelesen zu haben – durch eine 2-Sterne-Wertung Menschen Lust aufs Buch zu nehmen.

ein größeres Problem: Bei Amazon-Kritiken werden Rezensionen von Menschen, die das Produkt nachweislich bestellten, bevorzugt. Bei Goodreads aber kann man durch Kampagnen und anonyme Sockpuppet-Accounts Scores leicht ändern. Deshalb nehme ich Scores erst ab ca. 30, 40 Einzelwertungen ernst. Viele deutschsprachige Titel aus kleinen Verlagen haben aber nur sechs, sieben Stimmen: Ihre Scores werden nie repräsentativ.

.

06. “Lesezwillinge”, Vertrauenspersonen:

.

.

Unter jedem Goodreads-Profil: die Option “Compare Books”. Eine Extra-Seite zeigt alle Titel, die man gemeinsam hat – und stellt die Wertungen gegeneinander. Eine Funktion, die ich auch gern bei Kritiker*innen hätte, die im Feuilleton rezensieren; denn sie lässt überraschend tief blicken: Ich werte Haruki Murakami und viele feministische Memoirs überdurchschnittlich hoch. Meine 3 Sterne für “Tschick” und “Der Fänger im Roggen” fallen aus dem Rahmen. Viele Deutsche geben Christian Kracht und Bret Easton Ellis einen Stern – oder fünf.

  • Die Rezensionen unter jedem Buch sind nach Beliebtheit sortiert: Unter den ersten fünf sind oft schon ein, zwei interessante Stimmen.
  • Ich sehe oft nach, wer meine Lieblings- oder Hass-Bücher ähnlich euphorisch oder negativ wertete wie ich.
  • Öffne ich die Profile, klicke ich auf “Compare Books” und sehe nach, ob ich die Wertungen plausibel/hilfreich finde.
  • Lovelybooks wurde als Bestseller- und Unterhaltungs-Plattform vermarktet. Goodreads lockt auch Expert*innen, Akademiker*innen, Nerds: Ich folge Menschen, die z.B. italienische Hochliteratur lieben, Rrriot Girls oder Mangas mit Schwulen und Lesben.

.

ein Problem: In David Lodges “Changing Places” gibt ein Literaturprofessor auf einer Party zu, nie “Hamlet” gelesen zu haben – mit Folgen für seine Karriere. Ich fragte einen Germanisten-Freund, ob er zu Goodreads will. Er zierte sich lange: “Zeige ich, welche Bücher ich las, dann zeige ich damit auch, welche Bücher ich NICHT las. Ein peinlicher Offenbarungseid!” Jeder sieht, dass ich “Krieg und Frieden” nie las, “Die Blechtrommel” abbrach, nichts von Heinrich Böll kenne.

.

05. Rankings und Listen.

.

.

Spotify kennt meinen Musikgeschmack gut genug, um mir zweimal pro Woche (“Mix der Woche”, “Release Radar”) je 30 Songs vorzuschlagen – von denen viele gut passen. Auch Netflix hat eine beliebte “Recommendation Engine”. Die Empfehlungen bei Goodreads sind flau: Sobald ich deutsche Bücher bewerte, greift das System auf deutsche Bücher zurück – von denen die meisten in den USA erschienen. Weil dort noch immer Bücher über den zweiten Weltkrieg gefragt sind, heißt das: Statt Gegenwartsliteratur empfiehlt mir Goodreads – seit die persönlichen Empfehlungen eingeführt wurden (2011) – fast NUR Holocaust-Memoirs.

Unpersönlich dagegen – doch spezifisch und hilfreich: “Listopia”. Der Bereich, in dem jede*r öffentliche Listen erstellen und Titel auf bestehenden Listen nach oben voten oder neu einfügen kann.

Wer promoviert, an einem längeren Text arbeitet oder eine Nische erforschen will: Erstellt eine Liste – und schaut, ob sie wächst!

.

ein Problem: Auf den ersten Blick wirkt Goodreads zu US-fixiert. Es hilft, Listen auf Deutsch anzulegen – sonst werden sie bald von englischsprachigen Vorschlägen, Favoriten dominiert.

.

04. In Deutschland: lieber Lovelybooks?

.

.

Vorgestern las ich die Verlags-Programmvorschauen für Herbst 2017: Immer wieder wurde versprochen, dass der Verlag Geld an Lovelybooks zahlt, um als dort Werbung für den neuen (meist: Unterhaltungs- oder Liebesroman) Verlosungen und -Leserunden einzurichten. Als PR-Plattform scheint Lovelybooks immer wichtiger zu werden. Auf Goodreads dagegen pflegen Verlage oft nicht einmal das deutsche Cover, den deutschen Klappentext ein (…bis Fans/deutsche User*innen das übernehmen).

Goodreads wird “deutscher”/”deutschsprachiger”, indem man…

.

ein Problem: Der US-Markt sowie US-Klassiker werden durch viele, recht diverse US-Leser*innen in aller Vielfalt abgebildet – auch die Hochliteratur und akademische Diskurse. Ich finde dauernd rezensierende US-Bibiothekar*innen, Pädagog*innen. Mit etwas Mühe kann ich (immerhin) auch nach philippinischen, rumänischen, portugiesischen Bestsellern suchen. Doch die Vielfalt deutscher Verlage zeigt sich leider immer noch eher, indem man erst eine Stunde im “Perlentaucher”/Feuilleton liest, dann eine Stunde im Bahnhofsbuchhandel blättert.

“I already know how people like me, people who read books professionally and with a particular set of aesthetic values, respond to a text. I go to reader reviews to see how the other half reads” …begründet Literaturkritikerin Laura Miller – recht klassistisch / von oben herab – warum sie sich freut, dass Laienkritik, Fan-Meinungen und die Stimmen der Menschen, die meist nur zum Vergnügen lesen, durch Plattformen wie Goodreads sichtbarer werden.

.

03. …und meine Daten?

.

.

2013 wurde Goodreads von Amazon gekauft.

Auf Goodreads selbst änderte sich nichts: Ein Button namens Get a Copy leitet mich (schon seit zehn Jahren) an einen Online-Bookstore meiner Wahl; ich selbst stellte dort “Amazon.de” ein – nicht, um die Bücher dort zu kaufen, sondern, weil sich dann mit ein, zwei Klicks gleich eine Online-Leseprobe öffnet.

Die Übernahme ist problematisch, weil…

  • Amazon auf Goodreads noch schneller sehen kann, welche Bücher einen Hype/Sog entwickeln – besonders auch bei Fans und gebildeteren Käufer*innen.
  • Buch-Scores leicht zu manipulieren sind.
  • Bücher via Newsletter, Anzeigen etc. auf der Seite beworben (oder unsichtbarer gemacht) werden können.
  • Kindle-Daten dem Konzern zeigen, WIE wir lesen, wo wir abbrechen und pausieren…
  • …und Goodreads-Daten jetzt zusätzlich genau zeigen, was wir lesen WOLLEN.

Als User sind Goodreads und Amazon für mich nicht vergleichbar: Auf Goodreads kann ich Bücher markieren, sortieren, sichtbar machen oder wegklicken, in einer Optionen-Fülle, die mir Online-Stores oder Datenbanken nie gaben. Mir kommt das vor, als könne ich mit Leuchtstiften, Stickern, Handwagen etc. durch eine Buchhandlung laufen – und alles wegwerfen, umsortieren, anstreichen, nach meinen Vorstellungen stapeln. Die Amazon-Website gibt mir kaum Optionen, mich als Leser zu organisieren: Hier geht es um Angebote, Überflutung, Werbung, Kaufanreize. Goodreads dagegen ist – bislang – weiterhin ein Ort, an dem ICH entscheiden kann, was ich mir speichere und sichtbar halte.

Trotzdem glaube ich, dass Amazon durch die Goodreads-Daten noch aggressiver planen kann. (Gut, immerhin: Dass die meisten dieser Daten auf Goodreads offen sind und ich selbst – z.B. als Journalist – von außen ebenfalls viele Schlüsse aus all den Scores und Rankings etc. ziehen kann: Die Seite hat mir VIEL mehr gegeben und gezeigt, als ich bisher, durch meine Daten, dort “einzahlte”.)

.

02. Abseitiges, Serien, Direktvergleiche:

.

.

“Was macht gute Literatur aus?”, “Was macht Buch X besser als Y?”, das sind Irrsinns-Fragen: Sie müssen immer neu gestellt, verhandelt werden – und Goodreads hat auf sie keine besonders klugen oder neuen Antworten. Eine Frage aber, die die Plattform HERVORRAGEND beantwortet: “Welche Bücher lasen Menschen gern – und: lieber als andere?”

Ich bin besonders oft bei Goodreads, wenn ich mich nicht über EIN konkretes Buch informieren oder austauschen will – sondern frage:

Ich liebe die Website GraphTV: Sie zeigt, wie IMDB-User*innen alle Episoden von Serien bewerten – und liefert damit klare Tendenzen: Welche Serien laufen sich tot? Wo lohnt sich erst die zweite Staffel? Was wird besser und besser? [Beispiele: “The Americans”, “Friends”, “Game of Thrones”, “The Walking Dead”).

Goodreads ist kein Werkzeug, das mir objektiv zeigen kann: Die folgenden Bücher sind gut.

Doch Goodreads kann mir überraschend präzise Tendenzen, Entwicklungen, Abstufungen zeigen.

.

ein Problem, das ich oft fürchte, aber nicht besätigen kann: “Unbequeme” Bücher, Zumutungen, Herausforderungen, Irritationen, Kurswechsel, Experimente – werden sie auf Goodreads abgestraft? Werden nur Wohlfühl-Titel hoch bewertet oder Autor*innen gelobt, die keine Wagnisse eingehen, nur eine feste Formel bedienen? Nein. Die Scores zeigen: Auch das aller-breiteste Publikum ist VIEL kritischer, experimentierfreudiger meist.

schade aber: Wer Band 1 einer Serie, Reihe nicht mag, steigt aus. Wer Band 17 liest, liebt die Reihe meist. Deshalb haben Reihen oft immer höhere Wertungen – vielleicht auch solche, die den Hype nicht verdienen?

.

01. nie wieder die Angst: “Nichts macht mir Spaß!”

.

.

Wenn ich krank bin, müde, deprimiert, frage ich nicht mehr: Was soll ich lesen, sehen, hören? Die vielen Watch- und to-Read-Lists helfen mir, Titel präsent zu halten, auf die ich mich freue. Ich öffne Goodreads in Antiquariaten, Bibliotheken, als Wunschzettel, Merk- und Einkaufsliste. Ich war nie suizidal – doch ein Blick auf die Listen macht mir wie NICHTS ANDERES klar, wie viel ich noch nicht kenne… und unbedingt kennen will. Kultur, auf die ich mich freue. Geschichten, Figuren, Stimmen, für die ich mir Zeit nehmen will.

Mein Leben fühlt sich weiter, offener an – seit ich solche Listen pflege. #Vorfreude!

.

ein Problem: Für mich ist das Routine:

  • Bücher im Gespräch mit Freund*innen, im Feuilleton oder in Buchläden entdecken.
  • Sie auf Goodreads finden, Kritiken und den Score nachlesen.
  • Die Leseprobe anlesen.
  • …und DANN entscheiden: Will ich das kaufen und komplett lesen?

Viele Freund*innen brauchen das nicht: Sie lassen sich Bücher leihen oder schenken, kaufen nach Cover und Gefühl, sparen sich langes Überlegen. Ich bin Literaturkritiker: Mir ist wichtig, dass ich in alle bekannteren Bücher wenigstens kurze Blicke warf, mir einen ersten Überblick verschaffte, nicht zu viel Zeit mit Dutzendware verbringe. Doch ich verstehe alle, die sagen: “Eine Datenbank pflegen – über die eigenen Lese-Absichten? Wozu?”

Ich verbringe gut vier Tage im Monat, Bücher zu finden, zu sortieren, anzulesen, Redakteur*innen vorzuschlagen, in Listen zu bloggen.

Ich verbringe oft weniger als vier Tage im Monat damit, Bücher zu lesen.

Für mich passt diese Balance meist. Passt sie für euch? Dann: Goodreads, gern.

.

Romane 2017: Die besten neuen Bücher – Herbst, Frankfurter Buchmesse & Weihnachten

.

angelesen, vorgemerkt, entdeckt: meine Vorauswahl der literarischen Neuerscheinungen in der zweiten Jahreshälfte 2017 – neue Bücher für die Zeit zwischen Spätsommer, Frankfurter Buchmesse und Weihnachten.

Jeden Winter suche ich Romane / Neuerscheinungen und mache eine erste Liste für die Bücher des Jahres:

.

Hier meine Auswahl für Herbst und Winter 2017.

Die Klappentexte/Buchbeschreibungen wurden von mir gekürzt.

.

angelesen und gemocht:

.

neue Bücher 2017 Colson Whitehead, Mariana Leky, Geoffrey Household.png

.

Colson Whitehead: “Underground Railroad” (Hanser, 21.8. – Deutsch von Nikolaus Stingl) “Cora ist eine von unzähligen Schwarzen, die auf den Baumwollplantagen Georgias schlimmer als Tiere behandelt werden. Da hört sie von der Underground Railroad, einem geheimen Fluchtnetzwerk. Über eine Falltür beginnt eine atemberaubende Reise, auf der sie Leichendieben, Kopfgeldjägern, obskuren Ärzten, aber auch heldenhaften Bahnhofswärtern begegnet. Jeder Staat, den sie durchquert, hat andere Gesetze, andere Gefahren. Wartet am Ende wirklich die Freiheit?”

Mariana Leky: “Was man von hier aus sehen kann” (Dumont, 18.7.) “Selma, eine alte Westerwälderin, kann den Tod voraussehen. Immer, wenn ihr im Traum ein Okapi erscheint, stirbt am nächsten Tag jemand im Dorf. Unklar ist allerdings, wen es treffen wird. Das Porträt eines Dorfes, in dem alles auf wundersame Weise zusammenhängt.”

Geoffrey Household: “Einzelgänger, männlich” (Kein & Aber, 5.9. – Deutsch von Michel Bodmer) “Europa Anfang der Dreißigerjahre: Ein Jäger schleicht sich auf das Anwesen eines gefürchteten Diktators, legt an und zielt. Ein unvorstellbar spannender Thriller, geschrieben aus der Sicht des Verfolgten.” [Klassiker von 1939]

.

neue Bücher 2017 Gael Faye, Betty Smith, Tom Drury

.

Gael Faye: “Kleines Land” (Piper, 2.10. – Deutsch von Brigitte Große, Andrea Alvermann) “Als Kind pflückte Gabriel in Burundi mit seinen Freunden Mangos von den Bäumen. Heute lebt er in einem Vorort von Paris. Dorthin floh er, als der Bürgerkrieg das Paradies seiner Kindheit zerstörte. Doch er muss noch einmal zurück.”

Betty Smith: “Ein Baum wächst in Brooklyn” (Suhrkamp/Insel, 23.10. – Deutsch von Eike Schönfeld) “Die elfjährige Francie Nolan ist eine unbändige Leserin – und möchte Schriftstellerin werden. Ein Traum, der im bunten, ruppigen Williamsburg von 1912 kaum zu erfüllen ist. Hier brummen die Mietshäuser vor all den Zugewanderten.” [Klassiker von 1944.]

Tom Drury: “Grouse County” (Sammelband einer Romantrilogie, ich las und mochte “Die Traumjäger”; 5.8. – Deutsch von Gerhard Falkner, Nora Matocza) “Irgendwo im Mittleren Westen: Das Leben der Menschen zerbröckelt langsam, alle jagen unrealistischen Träumen nach – und sind Dorn im Auge des örtlichen Sheriffs, Dan Norman, der die Harmonie in seinem County wahren will. Die jüngere Generation sieht dagegen nur einen Ausweg, dem ländlichen Mief zu entkommen: nie mehr zurückkehren. Der Band enthählt die drei Romane »Das Ende des Vandalismus«, »Die Traumjäger « und den bisher auf Deutsch unveröffentlichten Roman »Pazifik«.”

.

neue Bücher 2017 Tim Winton, Margaret Atwood, Elena Lappin

Tim Winton: “Inselleben. Mein Australien” (Luchterhand, 24.7. – Deutsch von Klaus Berr) [Ich glaube, das ist der schwülstigste, unfreiwillig komischste Klappentext, den ich dieses Jahr las. Winton selbst schreibt zum Glück nicht halb so… pfaffenhaft.]

Margaret Atwood: “Aus Neugier und Leidenschaft. Gesammelte Essays [bis 2005]” (Berlin Verlag, 13.10. – Deutsch von Christiane Buchner, Claudia Max, Ina Pfitzner) ” Rezensionen zu John Updike und Toni Morrison; ein Afghanistan-Reisebericht, der zur Grundlage für den ‘Report der Magd’ wurde, leidenschaftliche Schriften zu ökologischen Themen, Nachrufe auf einige ihrer großen Freunde und Autorenkollegen…”

Elena Lappin: “In welcher Sprache träume ich?” (Kiepenheuer & Witsch, 7.9. – Deutsch von Hans Christian Oeser) “Hineingeboren ins Russische, verpflanzt erst ins Tschechische, dann ins Deutsche, eingeführt ins Hebräische und schließlich adoptiert vom Englischen – jede Sprache markiert einen neuen Lebensabschnitt in der Familiengeschichte Elena Lappins: Fragen nach Heimat, Identität, Judentum und Sprache. Sensibel geht sie den Erzählungen, Lebenslügen und Geheimnissen der Eltern und Großeltern nach und schildert, was es heißt, mit gleich mehrfach gekappten Wurzeln zu leben und auch nach dem Verlust einer Muttersprache schreiben zu wollen.”

.

neue Bücher 2017 Benjamin Alire Saenz, Guy Gavriel Kay, James Corey

.

Benjamin Alire Saenz: “Die unerklärliche Logik meines Lebens” (Jugendbuch, Hanser bei Thienemann, 19.8. – Deutsch von Uwe-Michael Gutzschhahn) “Sich gegenseitig auffangen – das haben Sal und seine beste Freundin Samantha bisher immer geschafft. Doch gelingt das auch, wenn alles droht, auseinanderzubrechen? Das letzte Schuljahr stellt ihre Freundschaft auf eine harte Probe. Sam gerät an einen miesen Typen, während Sal verzweifelt versucht, nicht zu einem zu werden.”

Guy Gavriel Kay: “Am Fluss der Sterne” (Fantasy, spielt 400 Jahre nach “Im Schatten des Himmels”, Fischer TOR, 26.10. – Deutsch von Ulrike Brauns) “Einst galt Xi’an als schönste Stadt der zivilisierten Welt, der Kaiserhof als Hort des Luxus und der Kultur. Doch seit Kitai in weiten Teilen an die Barbaren aus dem Norden gefallen ist, herrscht Angst auf den Straßen, und das Heulen der Wölfe hallt durch verfallene Gemäuer.”

James Corey: “Babylons Asche” (Science Fiction, Band 6 der “The Expanse”-Reihe, Heyne, 13.6. – Deutsch von Jürgen Langowski) “Die Menschheit hat das Sonnensystem kolonisiert. Auf dem Mond, dem Mars, im Asteroidengürtel und noch darüber hinaus gibt es Stationen und werden Rohstoffe abgebaut. Doch die Sterne sind den Menschen bisher verwehrt geblieben. Als der Kapitän eines kleinen Minenschiffs ein havariertes Schiff aufbringt, ahnt er nicht, welch gefährliches Geheimnis er in Händen hält – ein Geheimnis, das die Zukunft der ganzen menschlichen Zivilisation für immer verändern wird.”

.

deutschsprachige Literatur:

.

.

Jana Hensel: “Keinland. Ein Liebesroman” (Wallstein, 31.7.) “Jana Hensel lotet in kunstvollen Zeitsprüngen und Erinnerungen an Tage in Berlin und Nächte in Tel Aviv, an tiefe Innigkeit und immer wieder scheiternde Gespräche die Grenzen zwischen zwei Liebenden aus. Martin, der als Jude in Frankfurt am Main aufgewachsen ist, Deutschland aber nach der Wiedervereinigung verlassen hat und nach Tel Aviv gezogen ist, und Journalistin Nadja.”

Theresia Enzensberger: “Blaupause” (Hanser, 24.7.) “Luise Schilling ist jung, wissbegierig und voller Zukunft. Anfang der brodelnden zwanziger Jahre kommt sie an das Weimarer Bauhaus, studiert bei Professoren wie Gropius oder Kandinsky und wirft sich hinein in die Träume und Ideen ihrer Epoche. Zwischen Technik und Kunst, Populismus und Avantgarde, den Utopien einer ganzen Gesellschaft und individueller Liebe wird Luise deutlich, dass der Kampf um die große Freiheit vor dem eigenen kleinen Leben nie Halt macht.”

Maren Wurster: “Das Fell” (Hanser Berlin, 24.7.) “Vic freut sich auf die Reise mit Karl. Doch dann fährt Karl mit seiner Ex-Freundin und der gemeinsamen Tochter an die Ostsee und reagiert nicht auf Vics Nachrichten. Vic steigt aufs Fahrrad und fährt los, immer weiter durch eine Landschaft, die immer fremder wird. Etwas verändert sich in Vic, etwas Unheimliches kommt zum Vorschein.”

.

.

Thomas Lehr: “Schlafende Sonne” (Hanser, 21.8.) “Der Dokumentarfilmer Rudolf Zacharias will die Vernissage einer früheren Studentin besuchen. Milena zieht in der Ausstellung nicht nur eine künstlerische Lebensbilanz, sondern die ihrer Zeit. Historische Katastrophen stehen neben den privaten Verwicklungen dreier Menschen, die Spuren führen von den Schlachtfeldern des Ersten Weltkriegs bis ins heutige Berlin. Ein überwältigendes Fresko dieses deutschen Jahrhunderts: tragisch, komisch, grotesk, und immer wieder ganz persönlich und intim.”

Sabrina Janesch: “Die goldene Stadt” (Rowohlt Berlin, 18.8.) “Peru, 1887. Augusto Berns will die verlorene Stadt der Inka gefunden haben. Wer ist der Mann, der vielleicht El Dorado entdeckte? Erst seit kurzem weiß man, dass Machu Picchu von einem Deutschen entdeckt wurde. Ein Roman, der uns in eine exotische Welt eintauchen lässt [uff] – und zeigt, was es bedeutet, für einen Traum zu leben.”

Klaus Cäsar Zehrer: “Das Genie” (Diogenes, 23.8.) “Boston, 1910. Der elfjährige William James Sidis wurde von Geburt an mit einem speziellen Lernprogramm trainiert. Doch als er erwachsen wird, bricht er mit seinen Eltern und weigert sich, seine Intelligenz einer Gesellschaft zur Ver­fügung zu stellen, die von Ausbeutung, Profitsucht und Militärgewalt beherrscht wird.”

.

.

Dietmar Dath: “Der Schnitt durch die Sonne” (S. Fischer, 24.8.) “Sechs Menschen werden zusammengerufen, um zur Sonne zu reisen: eine Schülerin, ein Koch, ein Finanzberater, eine Mathematikerin, ein Gitarrist und eine Pianistin. Sie erfahren, dass es dort eine Zivilisation gibt, die anders ist als alles, was Menschen kennen. Mit neuen Körpern sollen sie drei große Aufgaben bewältigen und geraten dabei zwischen die Fronten eines gewaltigen Konflikts. »Der Schnitt durch die Sonne« steht in der Tradition von H.G. Wells, Stanisław Lem und Arno Schmidt. Ein abenteuerlicher, philosophischer und politischer Roman, der sich den drängenden Fragen unserer Gegenwart stellt.”

Marcus Braun: “Der letzte Buddha” (Hanser Berlin, 21.8.) “1995 erkannte der Dalai Lama in einem sechsjährigen Jungen den elften Panchen Lama, den zweithöchsten Würdenträger Tibets. Chinas Regierung zog den Jungen aus dem Verkehr und installierte an seiner Stelle den Sohn regimetreuer Kader. Marcus Braun lässt den echten Heiligen zwanzig Jahre später wieder auftauchen – in Los Angeles, als Surfer. Als Jonathan erfährt, wer er in Wahrheit ist, unterzieht er sich einem Lama-Coaching. Als sich der echte und der falsche Panchen Lama gegenüberstehen, geraten alle Gewissheiten ins Wanken. Der neue Roman eines der originellsten deutschsprachigen Autoren.”

Patricia Hempel: “Metrofolklore” (Klett-Cotta/Tropen, 9.9.) “Mitte 20 muss man unglücklich verliebt sein, damit man in den Dreißigern das Liebesglück noch mehr zu schätzen weiß« – das gilt auch für lesbische Archäologiestudentinnen. Wie aber damit umgehen, wenn die schöne Helene im Universitätsflur auftaucht? Eine solche Frau, ebenso makellos wie heterosexuell, kann man schließlich nicht einfach von der Seite anquatschen. Und wie besänftigt man gleichzeitig die unerwartet heftigen Kinderwünsche der eigenen Partnerin? Im Gewand eines Minneliedes verhandelt dieses unerschrockene Debüt die Grenzen der Liebe und der Lust.”

.

.

Sasha Marianna Salzmann: “Außer sich” (Suhrkamp, 11.9.) “Sie sind zu zweit, von Anfang an, die Zwillinge Alissa und Anton. In der kleinen Zweizimmerwohnung im Moskau der postsowjetischen Jahre verkrallen sie sich in die Locken des anderen, wenn die Eltern aufeinander losgehen. Später, in der westdeutschen Provinz, streunen sie durch die Flure des Asylheims. Noch später, als Alissa schon ihr Mathematikstudium in Berlin geschmissen hat, weil es sie vom Boxtraining abhält, verschwindet Anton spurlos. Irgendwann kommt eine Postkarte aus Istanbul – ohne Text, ohne Absender.”

Barbara Schibli: “Flechten” (Dörlemann, 4.9.) “Wer bin ich? Anna ist ein eineiiger Zwilling. Sie ist aus dem bündnerischen Bever nach Zürich gezogen, um Biologie zu studieren. Nun arbeitet sie in der Flechtenforschung, während ihre Schwester Leta sich der Fotografie widmet. Beide betrachten die Welt durch eine Linse: Anna durch das Mikroskop, während Leta seit der Kindheit obsessiv Anna fotografiert. Als Anna nach Treviso zur Eröffnung von Letas Fotoinstallation »Observing the Self« fährt, fühlt sie sich von ihr verraten, missbraucht und ausgelöscht. Denn Leta hat das einzige Zeichen, das sie beide unterscheidet, wegretuschiert.”

Sven Regener: “Wiener Straße” (Galiani Berlin, 7.9.) “November 1980: Frank Lehmann, neu in einer Wohnung über dem Café Einfall. Österreichische Aktionskünstler, ein ehemaliger Intimfriseurladen, eine Kettensäge, ein Kontaktbereichsbeamter, der Besuch einer Mutter und ein Schwangerschaftssimulator setzen eine Kette von Ereignissen in Gang, die alle ins Verderben reißen. Außer einen! Kreuzberg, Anfang der 80er Jahre – das war ein kreativer Urknall, eine surreale Welt aus Künstlern, Hausbesetzern, Freaks, Punks und Alles-frisch-Berlinern. Jeder kann ein Held sein. Kunst ist das Gebot der Stunde und Kunst kann alles sein. Ein Schmelztiegel der selbsterklärten Widerspenstigen.”

.

.

Christoph Held: “Bewohner” (Dörlemann, 18.8.) “Das Nichterkennenkönnen des eigenen Zustands gehört zum Erscheinungsbild der Alzheimerkrankheit. Held hat über viele Jahre in Alters- und Pflegeheimen beobachtet: Er erzählt von Bewohnern, die es so nicht gab, doch deren Geschichten alles andere als erfunden sind.”

Dirk van Versendaal: “Nyx” (Rowohlt, 17.11.) “Ein visionärer dystopischer Thriller, düster wie ein Film von Lars von Trier. Die Nyx, erbaut 2025, ist ein schwimmendes Ungetüm, viereinhalb Kilometer lang. Der Koloss zieht als gigantisches Alters- und Pflegeheim seine Bahnen durch alle Weltmeere – das ist einfach billiger, als die Alten an Land zu versorgen. Als die junge Ärztin Polly Sutter an Bord geht, tut sich aber schon seit längerem Unheimliches. Immer mehr Alte sterben. Die Nyx durchpflügt unbeirrbar die internationalen Gewässer, während an Bord ein Pandämonium ausbricht…”

Christian Bangel: “Oder Florida” (Piper, 2.10.) “Matthias Freier, 20, sitzt 1998 in seiner Platte und blickt auf Frankfurt (Oder): Ist das der wilde Osten – oder nur eine öde Brache, die sich fest in der Hand von Neonazis befindet?”

.

Frankreich – Gastland der Frankfurter Buchmesse 2017:

.

.

Annie Ernaux: “Die Jahre” (Suhrkamp, 11.9. – Deutsch von Sonja Finck) “Kindheit in der Nachkriegszeit, Algerienkrise, eine prekäre Ehe, de Gaulle, das Jahr 1968, Krankheiten und Verluste, die so genannte Emanzipation der Frau, Frankreich unter Mitterrand, die Folgen der Globalisierung, das eigene Altern. Anhand von Fotografien, Erinnerungen und Aufzeichnungen, von Wörtern, Melodien und Gegenständen vergegenwärtigt Annie Ernaux die Jahre. Sie schreibt ihr Leben – unser Leben, das Leben – in eine völlig neuartige Erzählform ein, in eine kollektive, »unpersönliche Autobiographie«.”

Arthur Dreyfus: “Nach Véronique” (Albino, 1.10. – Deutsch von Christiane Landgrebe) “Bernards Frau Véronique wird während eines Urlaubs in Tunesien Opfer eines terroristischen Anschlags. Die Tochter zieht für einige Tage in das elterliche Haus in der Pariser Banlieue. Doch Bernard will Rache. In Tunesien hat der junge Student Seifeddine gute Chancen, die ärmlichen Verhältnisse, aus denen er stammt, zu überwinden. Aber der Tod seines Bruders und die Trennung von seiner Geliebten treiben ihn in die Arme islamistischer Extremisten.” (hat passable Kritiken – doch der Klappentext klingt, als wimmle das Buch von Women in Refrigerators)

Jean-Marc Ceci: “Herr Origami” (Hoffmann & Campe, 12.9. – Deutsch von Claudia Kalscheuer) “Ein junger Japaner reist auf der Suche nach seiner großen Liebe nach Italien. Als er sie nicht finden kann, widmet er sich in der Toskana ganz der Meditation und der Herstellung von Washi, traditionellem japanischem Papier. Jahrzehnte später besucht ihn ein junger Uhrmacher. Die Begegnung gibt beiden Leben eine völlig neue Richtung.”

.

.

Négar Djavadi: “Desorientale” (C.H. Beck, 19.9. – Deutsch von Michaela Meßner) “Ein komisch-tragischer, autobiographischer Debütroman. Kimiâ Sadrs Familie stammt aus dem Iran. Ein zweiter Erzählstrang betrifft Kimiâ und ihre Schwangerschaft. Der Mann dazu ist nur geliehen – Kimiâ liebt eher Frauen. Seit zehn Jahren im Pariser Exil, hat Kimiâ stets versucht, ihr Land, ihre Kultur, ihre Familie auf Abstand zu halten.”

Joseph Andras: “Die Wunden unserer Brüder” (Hanser, 24.7. – Deutsch von Claudia Hamm) “Die wahre Geschichte des einzigen Europäers, der 1957 im algerischen Unabhängigkeitskrieg hingerichtet wurde – ein poetisches Debüt. Fernand Iveton ist dreißig, als er im November 1956 für die algerische Unabhängigkeitsbewegung in einem verlassenen Gebäude eine Bombe legt. Der Algerienfranzose will ein Zeichen setzen, ohne Opfer zu riskieren. Doch Iveton wird verraten und noch vor der Detonation verhaftet. Ein Franzose auf Seiten der Algerier ist nicht tragbar.”

Philippe Pujol: “Die Erschaffung des Monsters. Elend und Macht in Marseille” (Sachbuch; Hanser Berlin, 21.8. – Deutsch von Till Bardoux und Oliver Ilan Schulz) “Was Savianos “Gomorrha” für Neapel und “The Wire” für Baltimore ist, gelingt Philippe Pujol für Marseille. Ein städtischer Kosmos, in dem massive soziale Gegensätze aufeinander prallen. Von den minderjährigen Straßendealern bis zur unheiligen Allianz zwischen Lokalpolitikern und Immobilienhaie.”

.

internationale Literatur:

.

neue Bücher 2017 Petre M. Andreevski, Peter Nadas, Attila Bartis

.

Petre M. Andreevski: “Quecke” (Guggolz, 1.8. – Deutsch von Benjamin Langer) “Andreevski (1934–2006) schrieb mit »Quecke« den großen Roman über das Mazedonien zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts: Jon und Velika, ein Ehepaar aus einem kleinen Dorf in den Bergen, wird von den Umbrüchen der mazedonischen Geschichte erfasst. Es ist die Zeit der Balkankriege und des Ersten Weltkriegs. Die beiden erzählen in wechselnden Kapiteln von ihrem Leben – und zeigen, wie sie zwischen politischen Verwerfungen, Besitzansprüchen und Auseinandersetzungen fast zerrieben werden.”

Péter Nadas: “Aufleuchtende Details” (Autobiografie, Rowohlt, 22.9. – Deutsch von Christina Viragh) “Während Nádas’ Mutter am 14. Oktober 1942 in Budapest mit der Straßenbahn zur Entbindung fährt, liquidiert ein Einsatzkommando das Getto in Mizocz.
Jedes Ereignis, so Nádas, wirkt auf alle anderen Ereignisse ein – ob in der Politik oder der privaten Lebensgeschichte. Den weitgespannten Verflechtungen folgen Nádas’ Memoiren nicht chronologisch, sondern assoziativ, wie in seinen großen Romanen. Und durch jede einzelne Episode zieht sich die geheime Frage: Wie bin ich zu dem geworden, der ich bin, wenn jede persönliche Erinnerung, jede Prägung, untrennbar mit Geschichte verstrickt ist? Und so erzählt dieses Buch nicht zuletzt davon, wie Identität unter schwierigen Bedingungen wächst, während sie sich permanent im Strom der Zeit zu verlieren droht.”

Attila Bartis: “Das Ende” (Suhrkamp, 9.10. – Deutsch von Terezia Mora) “András Szabad wächst in einer ungarischen Kleinstadt auf, innig geliebt von seiner Mutter, einer Bibliothekarin. 1956 wird sein Vater wegen Teilnahme am Aufstand verhaftet. Als er nach drei Jahren völlig gebrochen nach Hause kommt, stirbt die Mutter – das Ende einer Kindheit. Mit dem Vater zieht er nach Budapest, und András entdeckt das Fotografieren. Die Kamera wird seine Leidenschaft, das Organ, mit dem er der Welt auflauert, sie sich vom Leib hält und aufs Bild bannt. Als er Jahrzehnte später vom Unfalltod Évas erfährt, einer nach Amerika emigrierten Pianistin, mit der ihn eine Amour fou verband, beginnt er sein Leben niederzuschreiben – kurze Episoden, gestochen scharfe Dialoge.”

.

neue Bücher 2017 Paolo Cognetti, Elizabeth Day, Nicolas Dickner

.

Paolo Cognetti: “Acht Berge” (DVA, 11.9. – Deutsch von Christiane Burghardt) “Pietro und Bruno erkunden als Kinder die verlassenen Häuser des Bergdorfs. Als Männer schlagen die Freunde verschiedene Wege ein. Der eine wird sein Dorf nie verlassen, der andere zieht als Dokumentarfilmer in die Welt. Er ringt mit Bruno um die Frage, welcher Weg der richtige ist. Stadt oder Land? Gehen oder Bleiben? Was zählt wirklich im Leben?”

Elizabeth Day: “Die Party” (Dumont, 19.9. – Deutsch von Klaus Timmermann und Ulrike Wasel) “Martin Gilmour hat nur einen Menschen, der ihm wirklich etwas bedeutet: Ben. Wenn er es sich auch nicht eingesteht, so dreht sich in seinem Leben doch alles darum, Ben zu gefallen und ähnlich zu sein. Ben ist das genaue Gegenteil von Martin: attraktiv, beliebt, reich. Martin genießt es, dazuzugehören. Und so tut er alles für Ben – wirklich alles.”

Nicolas Dickner: “Die sechs Freiheitsgrade” (Frankfurter Verlagsanstalt, 30.8. – Deutsch von Andreas Jandl) “Ein verlorener Trailerpark im Süden Québecs: Die fünfzehnjährige hochbegabte Tüftlerin Lisa bricht aus. Éric ist der Einzige, der sie versteht. Doch wegen chronischer Platzangst hat der junge Hacker das Haus seit Jahren nicht verlassen. Gemeinsam schmieden sie einen Plan, der Lisa auf die ungewöhnlichste Weltreise seit Jules Verne schickt. Die ehemalige Kreditkartenbetrügerin Jay muss Lisas Fährte aufnehmen. Ein globales Gesellschaftsspiel beginnt.”

.

neue Bücher 2017 Zurab Karumidze, Ljudmila Ulitzkaja, Szczepan Twardoch

.

Zurab Karumidze: “Dagny oder: ein Fest der Liebe” (Weidle, 1.9. – Deutsch von Stefan Weidle) “Ein großes postmodernes Spiel – doch die zentrale Figur, Dagny Juel, gab es wirklich: Sie wurde am 4. Juni 1901 in Tiflis von einem nicht erhörten Liebhaber erschossen. Sich selbst erschoß er dann auch. Dagny Juel war Norwegerin, lernte früh Edvard Munch kennen und wurde sein Modell (etwa für die berühmte »Madonna«). Später traf sie auf August Strindberg, der sie erst liebte und dann in einem Drama vernichtete. Schließlich aber heiratete sie den Bohemiensatanisten Stanislaw Przybyszewski.”

Ljudmila Ulitzkaja: “Jakobsleiter” (Hanser, 21.8. – Deutsch von Ganna-Maria Braungardt) “Nach der Revolution ziehen Jakow und Marussja mit ihrer kleinen Familie nach Moskau. Während Marussja der neuen Regierung vertraut, erkennt Jakow bald die Missstände. Unter Stalin wird er nach Sibirien verbannt. Seine Frau lässt sich scheiden, auch der Sohn wendet sich ab, und seine Enkelin Nora sieht er nur einmal als Kind. Sie, die ein bewegtes Leben führen wird – Bühnenbildnerin, alleinerziehend, georgische Liebschaft – lernt ihren Großvater erst aus seinen Liebesbriefen an die Großmutter kennen. Angeregt durch den Briefwechsel ihrer eigenen Großeltern hat Ljudmila Ulitzkaja einen Roman geschrieben, der die Geschichte Russlands im 20. Jahrhundert aus unmittelbarer Nähe erzählt.”

Szczepan Twardoch: “Der Boxer” (Rowohlt Berlin, 24.1. – Deutsch von Olaf Kühl) “Jakub Shapiro ist ein hoffnungsvoller junger Boxer und überhaupt sehr talentiert. Das erkennt auch der mächtige Warschauer Unterweltpate Kaplica, der Shapiro zu seinem Vertrauten macht. Doch rechte Putschpläne gegen die polnische Regierung bringen das Imperium Kaplicas in Bedrängnis; er kommt in Haft. Jakub Shapiro muss die Dinge in die Hand nehmen: Er geht gegen Feinde wie Verräter vor, beginnt – aus Leidenschaft und Kalkül – eine fatale Affäre mit der Tochter des Staatsanwalts, muss zugleich seine Frau und Kinder vor dem anschwellenden Hass schützen – und nimmt immer mehr die Rolle des Paten ein. Ein überragender, thrillerhafter Roman, der eine eruptive Epoche geradezu körperlich erlebbar macht.”

.

Sachbücher:

.

Ijoma Mangold: “Das deutsche Krokodil. Meine Geschichte.” (Rowohlt, 18.08.) “Ijoma hat dunkle Haut, dunkle Locken. In den siebziger Jahren wächst er in Heidelberg auf. Seine Mutter stammt aus Schlesien, sein Vater ist aus Nigeria nach Deutschland gekommen, um sich zum Facharzt für Kinderchirurgie ausbilden zu lassen. Weil es so verabredet war, geht er nach kurzer Zeit nach Afrika zurück und gründet dort eine neue Familie. Erst zweiundzwanzig Jahre später meldet er sich wieder. Wie wuchs man als «Mischlingskind» und «Mulatte» in der Bundesrepublik auf? Wie geht man um mit einem abwesenden Vater? Wie verhalten sich Rasse und Klasse zueinander? Und womit fällt man in Deutschland mehr aus dem Rahmen, mit einer dunklen Haut oder mit einer Leidenschaft für Thomas Mann und Richard Wagner?”

Rebecca Solnit: “Die Mutter aller Fragen” (Tempo, 17.11. – Deutsch von Kirsten Riesselmann) “»Warum haben Sie keine Kinder?« Diese »Mutter aller Fragen« wird Rebecca Solnit hartnäckig von Journalisten gestellt, die sich mehr für ihren Bauch als für ihre Bücher interessieren. Sie erklärt in ihren Essays, warum die Geschichte des Schweigens mit der Geschichte der Frauen untrennbar verknüpft ist, warum fünfjährige Jungen auf rosa Spielzeug lieber verzichten, und nennt 80 Bücher, die keine Frau lesen sollte, schreibt über Männer, die Feministen und Männer, die Vergewaltiger sind.”

Mareike Nieberding: “Als wir das Reden vergaßen. Eine Tochter-Vater-Geschichte” (Suhrkamp, 23.10.) “Ihre ganze Kindheit und Jugend wurde Mareike Nieberding von ihrem Vater abgeholt. Egal, wo sie war, egal, wie betrunken. Um ein Uhr nachts vom Schützenfest, um sieben nach der Schicht in der Kneipe. Sitzt sie ihm heute gegenüber, fragt sie sich, wer dieser ergrauende Mann eigentlich ist, was er fühlt, ob er glücklich ist. Wenn er sie vom Bahnhof abholt, reden sie auf dem Weg nach Hause über das Leben von Nachbarn und Bekannten, bis sie schließlich wortlos vor ihrem eigenen stehen. Sie streiten nicht. Sie haben sich nur nichts zu sagen. Als wir das Reden vergaßen erzählt davon, warum die meisten Tochter-Vater-Beziehungen nach der Pubertät nicht mehr dieselben sind. Und wie man sich wieder nahekommt, wenn man sich schon fast verloren hat.”

.

neue Sachbücher 2017 Konrad Paul Liessmann, Andreas Reckwitz, Martin Reichert

.

Konrad Paul Liessmann: “Bildung als Provokation” (Zsolnay, 25.9.) “Bildung wurde zu einer säkularen Heilslehre für die Lösung aller Probleme – von der Bekämpfung der Armut bis zur Integration von Migranten, vom Klimawandel bis zum Kampf gegen den Terror. Während aber „Bildung“ als Schlagwort in unserer Gesellschaft omnipräsent wurde, ist der Gebildete, ja jeder ernsthafte Bildungsanspruch zur Provokation geworden. Konrad Paul begibt sich in die Niederungen der Parteienlandschaft und die Untiefen der sozialen Netzwerke und denkt darüber nach, warum es so unangenehm ist, gebildeten Menschen zu begegnen.”

Andreas Reckwitz: “Die Gesellschaft der Singularitäten” (Suhrkamp, 9.10.) “Das Besondere und Einzigartige wird prämiert, eher reizlos ist das Allgemeine, Standardisierte. Der Durchschnittsmensch mit seinem Durchschnittsleben steht unter Konformitätsverdacht. Das neue Maß der Dinge sind die authentischen Subjekte mit originellen Interessen und kuratierter Biografie, aber auch die unverwechselbaren Güter und Events, Communities und Städte. Spätmoderne Gesellschaften feiern das Singuläre. Ausgehend von dieser Diagnose, untersucht Andreas Reckwitz den Prozess der Singularisierung, wie er sich zu Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts in Ökonomie, Arbeitswelt, Netzkultur, Lebensstilen und Politik abspielt.”

Martin Reichert: “Die Kapsel. AIDS in der Bundesrepublik” (Suhrkamp, 13.11.) “Gib Aids keine Chance – fast jeder Deutsche über dreißig kennt den Slogan dieser 1987 gestarteten Kampagne. »Truvada« heißt das Wundermittel, mit dem sich diese Forderung nun erfüllen soll. Die Kapsel, die HIV-Infizierten schon seit einiger Zeit zu Therapiezwecken verschrieben wird, dient mittlerweile auch der Prophylaxe. Aids hat die Art und Weise, wie wir leben und wie wir lieben, tiefgreifend verändert. Die Kapsel berichtet davon, wie die Krankheit ihren Weg ins Bewusstsein der Bundesrepublik fand.”

.

neue Sachbücher 2017 Alexander Gorkow, Ayelet Walman und Michael Chabon, Asne Seierstad

.

Alexander Gorkow: “Hotel Laguna. Meine Familie am Strand.” (Kiepenheuer & Witsch, 17.8.) “In der kleinen Bucht von Canyamel auf Mallorca verbrachte Gorkow seit den späten 60ern prägende Kindheitsurlaube. Mehr als 30 Jahre später trifft er nun Freunde von damals – und findet neue. Hier sieht er klar: seine, unsere Träume und Verluste. Zugleich Familienroman und Mentalitätsgeschichte: über unsere Urlaube, unser Land und unsere Sehnsüchte.”

Ayelet Waldman (…die ich sehr mag, und mit der ich 2010 ein langes Interview führte, LINK) und Michael Chabon (Hrsg.): “Oliven und Asche. Schriftstellerinnen und Schriftsteller berichten über die israelische Besetzung in Palästina” (Kiepenheuer & Witsch, 5.10.) “Die israelische Besatzungspolitik: International gefeierte Autorinnen und Autoren machen sich vor Ort ein Bild. Breaking the Silence wurde von ehemaligen israelischen Soldaten gegründet, die in den besetzten Gebieten gedient und Ungerechtigkeit direkt erlebt haben. Eva Menasse, Dave Eggers, Colum McCann und Arnon Grünberg reisten in die besetzten Gebiete. Der Leser reist z.B. mit Rachel Kushner in ein palästinensisches Flüchtlingscamp mitten in Jerusalem, lernt mit Taiye Selasi etwas über die verbotene Liebe zwischen Israelis und Palästinensern oder lässt sich von Helon Habila die verblüffende Genese der Israelischen Sperranlage erzählen.”

Asne Seierstad: “Zwei Schwestern. Im Bann des Jihad” (Kein & Aber, 4.10. – Deutsch von Nora Pröfrock; auch Freund Sebastian Christ veröffentlicht im Herbst ein Buch über einen IS-Aussteiger, “Meine falschen Brüder”) “Aufgewachsen und sozialisiert im europäischen Westen, verlassen zwei norwegisch-somalische Schwestern im Alter von 16 und 19 ihr Heimatland Norwegen. Ihr Ziel: der IS. Die Familie trifft das völlig unvorbereitet. Über soziale Medien halten sie Kontakt, versuchen herauszufinden, wo die Schwestern sich genau befinden und was die Gründe für ihre Handlungen sind. Irgendwann bricht der Kontakt ab, und der Vater begibt sich auf die lebensgefährliche Reise nach Syrien. Warum radikalisieren sich junge Frauen, die in gesicherten Verhältnissen aufwachsen? Åsne Seierstad nähert sich der Frage mit der Neugier und Genauigkeit einer der renommiertesten Journalistinnen Europas.”

.

neue Sachbücher 2017 Christiane Westermann, Henry Hitchings, Joachim Kalka Peanuts

.

Christiane Westermann: “Die Sache mit dem Abschied” (…ich finde sie oft gehemmt, verstockt – und bin gespannt, ob das lesenswerter wird, indem sie ein existenzielles Thema aufgreift; Kiepenheuer & Witsch, 9.11.) “»Zur letzten Sendung komme ich nicht«, sagte Christine Westermann scherzhaft schon Jahre, bevor an ein Ende der von ihr und Götz Alsmann moderierten TV-Sendung »Zimmer frei« auch nur zu denken war. So tief saß ihre Angst vor drohenden Abschieden. Wie schwer wiegt der Abschied von einem Freund, von dem man sicher war, dass er einen überleben würde? Wie leicht kann es sein, eine Stadt, einen Wohnort hinter sich zu lassen?”

Henry Hitchings (Hrsg.): “Die Welt in Seiten. Liebeserklärungen an Buchhandlungen” (Atlantik bei Hoffmann & Campe, 17.11.) “Daniel Kehlmann sinniert über den Wunsch, nicht angesprochen zu werden. Saša Stanišic’ darüber, wie man in einer neuen Stadt einen »Dealer« findet, ohne an einen Besserwisser zu geraten. Elif Shafak beschwört die Atmosphäre einer Istanbuler Buchhandlung herauf – ihr Chaos und ihre Vielfalt, den Geruch nach Tabak und Kaffee. 15 Schriftsteller aus aller Welt erörtern die soziale, kulturelle und politische Funktion von Buchhandlungen – ob in Bogotá oder Delhi, in London oder Berlin, in Kopenhagen oder Nairobi.”

Joachim Kalka: “Die Peanuts. 100 Seiten.” (Reclam, 29.9.) “Was fasziniert uns an den Kindern (und dem Hund), die doch im Grunde nichts Besonderes erleben? Joachim Kalka zeigt, welche Strömungen der amerikanischen Gesellschaft, etwa der Hype der Psychiatrie, sich in den Peanuts spiegeln.”

.

Comics / Graphic Novels:

.

Manu Larceret: “Brodecks Bericht” (Reprodukt, Oktober – Ulrich Pröfrock) “Ein Winter kurz nach Ende des Zweiten Weltkriegs. Abseits von einem kleinen Dorf im deutsch-französischen Grenzgebiet lebt Brodeck. Als er eines Abends ins Wirtshaus geht, trifft er auf eine schauerliche Szene: Die Dorfgemeinschaft hat soeben kollektiv einen Fremden ermordet. Brodeck ist entsetzt, doch die Männer zwingen ihn, einen Bericht zu verfassen, der ihre Tat rechtfertigen soll…” [ich las die Romanvorlage an: Link]

Barbara Yelin & Thomas von Steinaecker: “Der Sommer ihres Lebens” (Reprodukt, September) “Gerda steht am Fenster des Seniorenheims. Lange hat sie die Frage aufgeschoben, jetzt sucht sie eine Antwort: Hatte sie ein glückliches Leben? Während sie versucht, den Alltag im Heim zu meistern, denkt sie zurück an ihre Jugend in den 1960er Jahren; ihre Begeisterung für ein Fach, in dem sie als Frau schief angesehen wurde, die Astrophysik; die harte Wahl, die sie damals treffen musste, in jenem Sommer ihres Lebens: zwischen ihrer Liebe zu Peter und einer Karriere im Ausland… Die erste Zusammenarbeit zwischen der Zeichnerin Barbara Yelin und dem Schriftsteller Thomas von Steinaecker.”

Jillian Tamaki: “Grenzenlos” (Reprodukt, September – Deutsch von Sven Scheer) “Jenny ist ganz besessen von ihrem Spiegel-Facebook-Double – einer virtuellen, idealen Version ihrer selbst.”

.

danke an Ilja Regier, der – wie in den Vorjahren – sehr viele Verlagsvorschauen in seinem Blog verlinkte:

Antje Kunstmann +++ Albino +++ Atlantik +++ Aufbau +++ AvivA +++ Berenberg +++ Berlin Verlag +++ Blumenbar +++ Braumüller +++ C. Bertelsmann +++ C. H. Beck +++ Diogenes +++ Dörlemann +++ Dumont +++ DVA +++ edition.fotoTAPETA  +++ Frankfurter Verlagsanstalt +++ Galiani-Berlin +++ Guggolz +++ Hanser +++ Hanser Berlin +++ Hoffmann und Campe +++ Insel +++ Jung und Jung +++Kein & Aber +++ Kiepenheuer & Witsch +++ Kindler +++ Klett-Cotta +++ Knaus +++ Liebeskind +++ List +++ Louisoder +++ Luchterhand +++ Manesse +++ Matthes & Seitz Berlin +++ Mikrotext +++ Nagel & Kimche +++ Piper +++ Reclam +++ Reprodukt +++ Rowohlt +++ Rowohlt Berlin +++ S. Fischer +++ Schöffling & Co. +++ Suhrkamp +++ Tempo +++ Tropen +++ Ullstein +++ Ullstein Fünf +++ Verbrecher +++ Wallstein +++ Weidle +++ Zsolnay / Deuticke

.

P Olfermann